Mom to 5

Alcohol?

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I'm curious as to how alcohol hits a person faster if you've had RNY than any other normal person. Does anyone still drink here? How many drinks can you handle at once?

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Drinking after RNY is bad.  Alcohol is stronger, faster and weirder.  It will sidetrack your weight loss and put you in a stall from hell.  It's also a gateway to addiction transfer.  I have a rare and occasional weak drink but for the most part steer clear.  Not worth it.  The very quick buzz is quickly gone  just isnt worth undoing all the hard work I've done.

Edited by Happy-Camper

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Most surgeons insist that you wait a year before drinking, because of the effects it can have.  Not to mention the possibility of Addiction Transfer. 

 

I haven't had a drink since surgery, but then again, it was never that important to me.   I'd rather use those calories on something like nuts or cheese. 

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I waited a year and have only had 2 glasses of wine over the last month.  I sipped very slowly so that the glass lasted about an hour and felt nothing at all.  I did not have a second drink.  i know that would be a big problem for me!

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I'm 3 years out and alcohol still hits me fast them passes rather fast. but I don't drink often. I'll have a beer or two once or twice a month.

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I'm 3 years out and alcohol still hits me fast them passes rather fast. but I don't drink often. I'll have a beer or two once or twice a month.

Lol, you are so being judged right now. Not by me though, I'll have a cold brew with ya' anytime.

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Here is my word of caution on alcohol.  It can be very dangerous.  I am almost 5 years out and I can handle a half glass of wine or maybe a little bit of vodka in a light cranberry juice. Between the alcohol and the sugars I can't handle much. And I rarely have any.

 

But my ex also had the surgery. Yes he was an addict before surgery but the reaction when his addiction was re-awoken after surgery was scary and ugly.  The way his body handled it was terrifying.  Sadly he just died last week of an OD.  Not trying to scare anyone but just putting a caution flag out that it is something to be very careful of.

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Im so sorry to hear about your husband. Your in my thoughts and prayers.

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Im so sorry to hear about your husband. Your in my thoughts and prayers.

 

 

Thanks.  While he was still technically my spouse we had been separated for a few years now because I couldn't find him to finalize it.  Without sounding too callous, I'm ok and this is in a lot of ways a relief to me.

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I have no problems with drinking any alcohol. I do get drunk fast, but it goes away just as fast. I don't enjoy the buzz like I used too. It is a strange drunk.

 

I have gained a few pounds from the alcohol so I have cut way back. You are not destined to become an alcoholic because you drink after GB. You have to be in control like everyone else.

 

Everything in moderation. I was a social drinker before GB and I continue to be. No problems here. I do try to stick to low carb drinks like Crystal light and vodka.

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Before surgery, I drank 1-2 glasses of wine occasionally with a nice dinner. I would feel tipsy.   I didn't drink for the first year after surgery. Now, I will drink 1/4 to 1/2 for taste and flavor - e.g. with a cheese pairing or something. 

 

I drink 1 glass of water to every 1/4 glass of wine and take all night to do so.  I feel tipsy after a few sips - but its hard to tell because it feels a lot like a sugar reaction too.  I can avoid most of it by drinking the water with it.  If I don't drink the water along side

 

I don't say ahead, I am only going to drink half of this;  I intend to drink 1 glass.  But I never can.  I feel the lightheadedness pretty quickly, and drinking that much water with it, I get full.

 

I don't want to give up wine for taste, warmth, culture, hobby so this is my solution.

 

My husband had surgery 11 yrs ago.  He drinks craft brew beer.  He says the carbonation in beer does not bother him, and he can drink 3 or 4 beers. He can't tolerate a soda though with carbonation.  Its a calorie issue for him with beer, but not an intoxication one.  He has maintained his 110 pound loss, but like me is not at goal.

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I cannot help but feel the psychological factors involved in this wonderful surgical life changing procedure have NOT been given propier consideration. Food can and is for almost all of us an addiction. A learned behavior with fundamental flaws that if ignored will resurface. Proper psychotherapy to recipients POST GBS is indicated and should be mandatory follow up. Addiction transfer is likely and bad choices (alcohol in this instance) can be avoided with timely medical intervention. Addictive transfer is not NEW to medicine and should not be a barrier either to acceptance of GBS. 

 

It's upsetting to READ of death when there is so much help available for those of us in crisis. My condolences for your loss. 

 

 

Edited by Wusang

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I drink. I don't drink A LOT. Or regularly... but I can have a drink.Especially when I travel or I'm at work functions, people drink. So I needed to figure out what I could drink.

 

SO, sometimes I have red wine but usually I can only handle a few sips.

 

I can never have beer - and honestly I've never liked beer anyway.

 

I used to love vodka drinks but I find that now the combination with the sugars in the OJ or the cosmo mix are too much for me now and I get too drunk, too fast.

 

My current drink is a Jack and Coke. Not a Diet Coke, a real Coke. (I read online that you get 28% drinker faster with a Diet soda since there's no sugar to neutralize the alcohol) What generally happens is I get sort of tipsy about 3 sips in (where most people would get tipsy 1 or 2 drinks in) and I can drink a whole one. I tend to order a TALL. Sometimes I order a water after or a plain Diet Coke after and people tend to not notice in a social setting.

 

Then I may or may not have a second drink depending on how long the function is.

 

I cannot drive at all if I have even a sip of anything..........period. So this is only if I'm at a hotel or a passenger.

 

So that's it. Again, its not a regular thing, but its possible, for me. Just an FYI.

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I find I can have about half a beer or a few sips of dry wine. More than that makes me dump.

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Looking back to before surgery I drank probably more than I should have. It was not unusual for us to have margaritas on the deck in the summer, bloody marys in the winter. That said a couple weeks ago I went out to a Mexican restaurant with some friends; everyone was having a margarita, so wanting to be normal, I ordered one. About a quarter of the way through it I was sick to my stomach went to the restaurant and tried to throw up. Then that weekend I bought some skinny margarita and drank about a shot of it and felt drunk; I've decided its not worth it for the way I feel and for the calories. On vacation I've had a sip or two of my husbands rum punch or pina colada but basically a taste. Drinking just isn't for me...

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Alcohol is broken down by the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase.  Mostly this happens in the liver, but in a person who hasn't had surgery, alcohol dehydrogenase is produced by the stomach, and so alcohol starts being deactivated before it's even passed into the small intestine to be absorbed.  In gastric bypass, the part of the stomach that produces alcohol dehydrogenase is bypassed or removed, so there's no pre-absorption breakdown.  Plus, liquids empty into the small intestine much more quickly in a bypass patient than in someone with a normal stomach.  These two factors mean that alcohol will get you drunker, faster, than it did preop.  

</geek> 

 

I didn't drink at all for a long time, and now maybe have one a month, if that - and I have to drink it really slowly.  I had a pint the other night, but I sipped it over about 4 hours (actually I don't think I finished it, it had gone kind of warm and grim), and that was as tipsy as I ever care to be, really!  

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These days, my trick if I choose to drink? Make every second drink water. Has worked perfectly for me. After drinking a water, drinking another beer can be difficult to complete.

Edited by Wusang

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When I was in the Caribbean a couple of months ago, I ordered a rum punch and added the pineapple flavored protein powder to it. I thought adding the protein might slow down the alcohol absorption. I'm a sleeve and I know its different for sleeves so I don't know what it would do for a by-pass. I nursed the drink over an hour, felt a little tipsy but not at all sick.

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When I was in the Caribbean a couple of months ago, I ordered a rum punch and added the pineapple flavored protein powder to it. I thought adding the protein might slow down the alcohol absorption. I'm a sleeve and I know its different for sleeves so I don't know what it would do for a by-pass. I nursed the drink over an hour, felt a little tipsy but not at all sick.

 

The enzyme issue is essentially the same deal as with bypass - the sleeve part of the stomach doesn't produce alcohol dehydrogenase.  Blood alcohol levels rise faster and higher in sleeve patients than in healthy controls, I don't think a direct comparison has been made against bypass patients. 

(Do stop me if I'm boring - I'm writing my dissertation on addiction transfer at the moment so I've read entirely too much about alcohol and WLS!)  

Edited by Welsh Dragon

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The enzyme issue is essentially the same deal as with bypass - the sleeve part of the stomach doesn't produce alcohol dehydrogenase.  Blood alcohol levels rise faster and higher in sleeve patients than in healthy controls, I don't think a direct comparison has been made against bypass patients. 

(Do stop me if I'm boring - I'm writing my dissertation on addiction transfer at the moment so I've read entirely too much about alcohol and WLS!)  

Please don't stop. Its very interesting. Thank you!

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After a luncheon with an old friend today wherein he had repeated an old saying we use at work "Can't see the forest for the trees" got me to conclude I never was an alcoholic. Likewise, left unchecked I would certainly developed into an alcoholic quickly from zero to 100 mph hour 

 

ABSORBTION described by Welsh Dragon :D, an informative NEED TO KNOW thought provoking bit of information for GBS patients concerning alcohol consumption. Our vulnerability is high, awareness is a must have working tool to protecting ourselves.

 

To have learned that there is a scientific / empirical / measurable connection between gastric bypass + alcohol disorders holds important implications to my post bariatric surgery. Regardless my lack of alcohol history pre-surgery, I need to be educated about ALL potential effects of bariatric post-surgery particularly the increase potential risk of alcoholism.  I am all for education and counselling on the various and sundry changes that will affect us post-operatively. 

 

Thank you Welsh Dragon. I now better understand the role GBS plays with alcohol. I get intoxicated quicker, and sustain intoxication longer as a GBS recipient, my blood/alcohol content readings are significantly higher than norm non surgery individuals, and has resulted in my avoidance or dilution by every other drink being water when consuming alcohol. For all that has been written I know am my own Liquor Control Board.  I see the forest, and I see the trees in the forest. All good.

 

Cheers

 

 

Welsh Dragon:

Alcohol is broken down by the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase.  Mostly this happens in the liver, but in a person who hasn't had surgery, alcohol dehydrogenase is produced by the stomach, and so alcohol starts being deactivated before it's even passed into the small intestine to be absorbed.  In gastric bypass, the part of the stomach that produces alcohol dehydrogenase is bypassed or removed, so there's no pre-absorption breakdown.  Plus, liquids empty into the small intestine much more quickly in a bypass patient than in someone with a normal stomach.  These two factors mean that alcohol will get you drunker, faster, than it did preop.  

 

Welsh Dragon:

The enzyme issue is essentially the same deal as with bypass - the sleeve part of the stomach doesn't produce alcohol dehydrogenase.  Blood alcohol levels rise faster and higher in sleeve patients than in healthy controls, I don't think a direct comparison has been made against bypass patients. 

(Do stop me if I'm boring - I'm writing my dissertation on addiction transfer at the moment so I've read entirely too much about alcohol and WLS!)  

 

Some interesting links (the last one is side topic interesting):

 

http://www.medpagetoday.com/Psychiatry/Addictions/5943

 

http://www.thefix.com/content/gastric-surgery-alcohol-abuse-switching-addictions8421

 

http://scholar.google.ca/scholar?q=enzyme+alcohol+dehydrogenase+and+gastric+bypass+surgery&hl=en&as_sdt=0&as_vis=1&oi=scholart&sa=X&ei=7_GuU8K9BcKpyASzmoHgAg&ved=0CBoQgQMwAA

 

itsnotaddictiontransfer.wordpress.com/

Edited by Wusang

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I was never a big drinker before surgery and after surgery I really didn't drink either.  Over the last maybe two years I've been drinking beers on the weekends when my boyfriend and I go out.  In the beginning one maybe two beers and that was it for me but now I can tolerate more and the worst result for me is I have put on about 30 pounds so I think I need to stop drinking completely.  It kinda sucks cause I enjoy having a good time when we go out, I don't consider myself a partier or anything but I enjoy getting a nice buzz, dancing, and having fun.  Guess I'm going to have to have fun without the beers.  Anyone else have this problem?  I'll be six years out in November,  I started at 263, lowest was 126 which was too skinny for me I needed to add about 10 pounds on but instead it's more like 30, need to take off about 20 to be comfortable.  I watch what i eat and I hit the gym as often as I can, some weeks it can be every day and other weeks I barely get there, depends on the crazy schedules.  I also bought the T25 plan, I started that and loved it then fell off the wagon after going to Aruba in May, then my son's hs graduation, now I'm trying to get myself back on track for that because it is intense and a great workout.

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I drink occasionally, and its mainly wine I drink. I'm 9 years out and I swear still after the first sip, I get that buzz feeling. I limit myself to two glasses if I'm out, and drink water at the same time! It helps a lot! ;)  

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I'm now over 5 years out and have maintained a 141lb loss (324 starting weight), and prior to the bypass didnt drink unless I was planning on complete and utter excess.  Which in reality meant, I drank a few times a year.  After the bypass, I followed all the rules to the letter for the first couple of years.  No alcohol at all until about year 3, it was then that I developed a pretty unhealthy relationship with scotch and bourbon.  I let this continue for entirely too long, but I've recently come to grips with it and got my usage under control.

 

I completely agree with everyone here, the buzz comes on FAST and dissipates FAST, the good news/bad news for me was that the normal warning signs of drinking too much (the epic hangover) were completely absent, so it was kind of easy to tell myself that I wasnt overdoing it.

 

As with most things in life, I think the key is moderation and mindfulness.  I now drink a glass of wine or scotch (maybe 2) a couple of times a week.  It used to be that a bottle of scotch would only last me a week.

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Smirnoff lite vodka..."sorbet" they have a peach mango that is lovely and no carbs.   I have 1-2 max, once in a blue moon...

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