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So this morning, I had a little bit of an "oogie" feeling after breakfast, nothing big and I thought OHHHHH I just had dumping syndrome. HA! Laugh was on me I guess, because about 3 1/2 hours after lunch (I only had a little bit of cottage cheese and a few sips of beef broth from a beef/pasta soup) I was in the grocery store buying dinner when I got SO dizzy, I nearly passed out. Cold sweats, shaking, dizziness, massive abdominal cramping, and eventually a manager that called 9-1-1.......OHHH SOOO EMBARASSING. After passing out (with my two youngest with me, no less) the paramedics were VERY VERY nice when I told them I was 15 days post op RNY and they said it was late dumping syndrome (they were nice enough to call my surgeon so I didn't have to go to the hospital!). I had never heard of LATE dumping syndrome.....apparently my blood sugar tanked (it was 39). WEIRD........ I felt SO much better after keeling over in the store..... guess my body just gave out. HMMMPHHH. guess no more beef broth from soups for me!!!!!

That'll teach me to think I dodged the Dumping bullet if I make it to one hour after eating!!!!!HA

Poppy

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Poppy - you need to a) start eating something every 2 hours - even if it's just a little snack and :cool: start checking your blood sugar 2 hours postprandial (after eating). Your goal is to keep your blood sugars between 70 and 100.

Keep detailed notes of what you ate and the times and your blood glucose levels - that's helpful information for your surgeon.

I'd also suggest you start keeping something like glucose tablets around the house, in the car and in your bag. They can help get your glucose level up if you start feeling those symptoms again.

Personally, I using regular Lifesaver mints for that. Regular glucose tablets like Dex® or ReliOn Glucose tablets have 4g glucose (sugar). Lifesavers Wint-O-Green Mints have 3.5g sugars each.

A tub of 50 Dex® Glucose tablets work out at close to 10 cents each. You can pick up a 13oz bag of Lifesavers for around $2.70 ... OK, so I'm cheap! :P

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oh no! I am glad that it was nothing totally serious...although passing out can be serious! I hope that doesn't happen to you again!

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oh no! I am glad that it was nothing totally serious...although passing out can be serious! I hope that doesn't happen to you again!

A low blood glucose level can do that. It's called hypoglycemia - something we have to watch out for post gastric bypass.

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Sorry I upset you all.

Will keep my opinions to myself I suppose.

Glad you are well Poppy! :0)

Edited by HuntressRachel
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Well Poppy... one thing I have noticed about this site...

What is right for one person isn't necessarily right for another...

HONESTLY if I was you I would go see or speak with both your PCP and/or Surgeon. Cinwa is telling you where your Blood sugars should be, and how often you should eat, and when to take sure blood glucose .....and EVERYONE is different..and every Dr. is different. PLEASE see your Dr. and dont just assume your BS should be in that range because someone on here says they should be...my glucose range is no where near what CINWA is suggesting!!! And some of us just can eat every two hours! Bothers me when people try to give advice like they are Dr's..and i suppose even if they are, they are not YOUR Dr. and don't know your history.....One downfall I have seen with this site....

Good luck, and so glad your feeling better!!!

Poppy had already stated that the paramedics contacted her surgeon about her low blood level (39) - aka hypoglycemia. It's natural to assume she would be having a follow-up about the episode - hence my suggestion to keep a record of food and postprandial blood glucose numbers.

Everyone is different but the standard protocol for the treatment of reactive hypoglycemia is as I outlined - there's plenty of information about it - I've posted links several times. Late dumping syndrome that results in a blood glucose level of 37 is hypoglycemia!

Fasting glucose levels should be within the range of 70-99mg/dL. Anything below that is hypoglycemia - it's a dangerous state that needs treating immediately with glucose/sugar.

Information is widely available - I don't make this stuff up - it's something I've dealt with on a daily basis: http://www.weightlosstriumph.com/treatment-of-hyperinsulinemic-hypoglycemia-after-gastric-bypass.html

This is an interesting read too:

The Gastric Bypass Connection

Reactive hypoglycemia is common after gastric bypass surgery because of the lack of a pylorus. Following gastric bypass, food passes through the pouch via the stoma. In many cases, this can occur relatively rapidly, leading to quick absorption of carbohydrates in the small intestine. Under normal circumstances, the pylorus gradually introduces food into the small intestine. Following gastric bypass, the mechanism for moderation is removed, and food is “dumped” into the small intestine. This is the same mechanism behind dumping syndrome.

How Do I Treat Reactive Hypoglycemia?

The easiest way to manage reactive hypoglycemia is to eat several small meals throughout the day, typically every two to three hours. Meals should be balanced, including fat and protein as well as carbohydrates. Simple carbohydrates, such as sugar or grains, should not be eaten on an empty stomach.

If your blood sugar drops, it is crucial that you bring it back up quickly. The best way to raise your numbers is to eat simple carbohydrates. Glucose tabs are readily available at drug and grocery stores. Otherwise, juice or hard candies will work well. But, remember that consuming only those simple carbohydrates will set you up for another crash. To prevent that, follow the carbohydrates with a combination of protein and fat. Protein and fat regulate blood sugar levels, keeping them within normal ranges.

A blood glucose monitor is also a good resource for managing reactive hypoglycemia. When you feel the symptoms of reactive hypoglycemia, test your blood sugar. Technically speaking, hypoglycemia involves blood sugar levels under 70 mg/dL, though symptoms may not occur until levels drop below 60 mg/dL. Levels under 50 mg/dL can affect brain function and should be taken very seriously.

If you think you are experiencing reactive hypoglycemia, test you blood sugar levels before eating, one hour after eating, two hours after eating, and three hours after eating for a few days. If your numbers show a trend of low blood sugar in the postprandial period (the time after eating), reactive hypoglycemia is likely the culprit. Your blood sugar log will help your medical professional to reach a correct diagnosis.

At times, you can also experience the symptoms of reactive hypoglycemia without corresponding blood sugar levels. I have had textbook reactive hypoglycemic symptoms—shakiness, nausea, confusion—with blood sugar just above 70 mg/dL. My speculation is that the blood sugar dropped rapidly, and the symptoms are a response to the rapid drop, rather than to a low level. That’s just my hypothesis, though.

The Bottom Line

Normal blood sugar levels are crucial to your body’s function. In extreme circumstances, reactive hypoglycemia can lead to neurological problems, including seizures. If you believe that you are experiencing low blood sugar levels, take responsibility for your own health. Start testing your levels and treating any low episodes. You and you alone are responsible for your health after bariatric surgery. Take it seriously.

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Rachel and Cinwa,

I do thank both of you for caring about my health!! It is so wonderful to have a support group that is able to see so many different aspects of a situation.

Rachel,

I love having input from knowledgable individuals who have traveled this journey before. As I stated above, the paramedics did contact my surgeon ( I have to carry my emergency contact card at all times) and knowing that I had my first post-op followup appointment today (24 hours after this incident) she decided that the paramedics could bring my blood sugar back up and she would further evaluate me at the follow up. As anyone knows, it is very important to run ANYTHING this important by your PCP and surgeon.

At my appointment, I frankly told my doc that "one of the ladies from my online support site" gave me the following information- and asked what she thought of it. She agreed completely!! In fact, when she tested me at the office (the drive is three hours and I didn't get a chance to eat at the two hour mark) my blood sugar was 51. I am now required to eat every two hours and maintain a journal of postprandial blood glucose readings until I am to the point I am able to eat more regular foods that will sustain my blood sugar for a longer period of time. I am also supposed to carry some "full-sugar" hard candies to bring my glucose levels back up if they drop.

Cinwa- you were right on the money, and my surgeon was very appreciative that I have such a great support group to share my acomplishments, trials, and frustrations!! She was so impressed, she was going to come on here and see what TTF is all about :D

Poppy

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Great poppy!

So glad things went great for you!

Hope you continue to feel better! :D

And I apologize if I upset anyone.. was just my two cents!!!

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glad you are ok. cinwa really knows here stuff! i tend to keep things i can eat in my purse just to make sure that I don't get caught somewhere too long without eating. I found it really helped. I was tired of having to get some nuts at the gas station after being stuck in traffic after a long meeting. You might want to pop a protein bar in your car and purse along with the hard candies as planning precautions. Glad you are o.k.!!!!

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Great poppy!

So glad things went great for you!

Hope you continue to feel better! :D

And I apologize if I upset anyone.. was just my two cents!!!

No apologies needed babe - you did not upset me. You have a right express your opinion.

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Rachel and Cinwa,

I do thank both of you for caring about my health!! It is so wonderful to have a support group that is able to see so many different aspects of a situation.

Rachel,

I love having input from knowledgable individuals who have traveled this journey before. As I stated above, the paramedics did contact my surgeon ( I have to carry my emergency contact card at all times) and knowing that I had my first post-op followup appointment today (24 hours after this incident) she decided that the paramedics could bring my blood sugar back up and she would further evaluate me at the follow up. As anyone knows, it is very important to run ANYTHING this important by your PCP and surgeon.

At my appointment, I frankly told my doc that "one of the ladies from my online support site" gave me the following information- and asked what she thought of it. She agreed completely!! In fact, when she tested me at the office (the drive is three hours and I didn't get a chance to eat at the two hour mark) my blood sugar was 51. I am now required to eat every two hours and maintain a journal of postprandial blood glucose readings until I am to the point I am able to eat more regular foods that will sustain my blood sugar for a longer period of time. I am also supposed to carry some "full-sugar" hard candies to bring my glucose levels back up if they drop.

Cinwa- you were right on the money, and my surgeon was very appreciative that I have such a great support group to share my acomplishments, trials, and frustrations!! She was so impressed, she was going to come on here and see what TTF is all about :D

Poppy

Poppy - I'm glad that you got medical advice promptly.

Hopefully, eating something small every couple of hours will keep your blood sugars up. But if you still have some issues, give me a yell and we'll start looking at what you're eating - keeping the carb intake low helps but not all carbs are equal and we each react differently too.

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Cinwa put a link to weight loss triumph on this- ya'll should read this- it gives you great insight to how bad it can be if untreated. I have

several post on it- I went for 5 years not realizing what was going on. The earlier it is caught the better it is managed. This website has

been a godsend- I just wish I knew about it 11 yrs ago when I had my surgery. I'm glad some of the drs are doing better with after care

this is so important. Everyone keep up the good work- ya'll inspire us that need help

Clia

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Poppy - you need to a) start eating something every 2 hours - even if it's just a little snack and :cool: start checking your blood sugar 2 hours postprandial (after eating). Your goal is to keep your blood sugars between 70 and 100.

Keep detailed notes of what you ate and the times and your blood glucose levels - that's helpful information for your surgeon.

I'd also suggest you start keeping something like glucose tablets around the house, in the car and in your bag. They can help get your glucose level up if you start feeling those symptoms again.

Personally, I using regular Lifesaver mints for that. Regular glucose tablets like Dex® or ReliOn Glucose tablets have 4g glucose (sugar). Lifesavers Wint-O-Green Mints have 3.5g sugars each.

A tub of 50 Dex® Glucose tablets work out at close to 10 cents each. You can pick up a 13oz bag of Lifesavers for around $2.70 ... OK, so I'm cheap! :P

Great advice ... keeping raisins close is also a good thing.

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Great advice ... keeping raisins close is also a good thing.

Good tip!

I carry little baggies of whole almonds or dry roasted edamame (Seapoint Farms) and golden, seedless raisins (softer and juicer than the regular dark ones). 1/4 cup of Seapoint Farms Roasted Edamame with 1/2oz of golden, seedless raisins (juicer and softer than regular black ones). Roasted edamame has 14g of protein per 1/4 cup (28.3g) so I prefer that over nuts (almonds have around 6.3g protein for the same 28.3g)

But nuts and raisins work well too: http://dr-phil.wrytestuff.com/swa485929.htm

... a mix of nuts and raisins in a 5 nuts to 1 raisin. Never let more than 2.5 hours go by without taking a small handful to eat. This gives some "fast" sugar from the raisins, and slower sugar and protein from the nuts. This is the best method for all persons who know that they are prone to hypoglycemia.
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I have this problem if I don't eat often or if I eat just carbs such as a piece of bread or bagel or something not balanced. Keeping my intake of those items very low and eating often helps a lot. If I feel like it is starting to go low, I often will drink some milk as there is a bit of fat, some carbs, and protein.

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I have had hypoglycemia for a long time too. At least 20 years. I think I could have had a car accident when my mind was confused and out of it during an episode. Hypoglycemia can be so serious at times. This is such a good thread as a reminder on how to handle our diets. I think the snacks are spot on. I keep glucose, dried edamame and all of the things mentioned stashed around. I also eat all day long it seems. Every two hours at least. I prepare a lunchbox of healthy snacks and foods and plow through them during my work day. It is really helping.

Most importantlyI try so hard to not set myself up for reactive hypoglycemia. But sometimes I just mess up. Somedays when I think I make good choices, things still didn't add up and I get hypoglycemic.

But, I think because this GBP diet needs to be so perfect I am making better choices than pre-op and therefore have less issues. Yea for small blessings in disguise.

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