Claire-in-Texas

The Honeymoon Period

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Thank you so much for sharing! Im almost 2 months in my new life, and boy - it has been rough! I had dark times, feeling sorry for myself and all the food I could never eat again, feeling it wasnt worth it and just wanted to go back to my old life. 

 

BUT NOW!! I have never felt better (even though I still have nausea sometimes and some other small issues) - but Im getting comfortable with my body and the way it works now. I made a very conscious decision to NOT feel sorry for my self, and look at all the things I can do from now on - and stop thinking about the food.

 

Honestly - I dont miss eating chocolates, sweets etc. Im eating according to plan, and for every bite I think of how much good Im doing for myself.

 

I couldnt care less when people are eating cakes etc. in front of me - actually I encourage them, because it only re-confirms me of how well im treating myself now!

 

And the weight is just coming off - since the 30/6 I have lost 17 kilos. It is a very incredible journey and I love myself for doing this.

Karina, I feel your pure JOY!  I remember feeling this - I remember it very well.  I still feel it to a degree.  It truly is a joyful experience when you simply "get it."  And when you "get it" now, you will definitely evolve to a comfortable life style change.  Your powerful tool of gastric bypass will assist you and guide you, since you "get" what it is all about.  It's new now, and it will evolve to good eating habits!

 

I don't get on the scale often, but when I do, I pat myself on the back - I am so happy that I am a recovering food addict, a successful one!

 

You go, girl!!!

 

Best,

Claire

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This is a great thread!! I really appreciate the honesty and emphasis on following the rules and sticking to plan...period. I'm terrified by the thought that I may not make it to my goal before the honeymoon is over. The surgeon's number is about 20 pounds higher than mine. I'm four months out. I've not had a bite or sip of anything that is off plan. I exercise at least 5 days a week both cardio and weights.

I'm determined not to go off plan even a little bit until I'm at goal and maintaining a while. Maybe longer. I'll reevaluate at that time.

When asked if I can have this or that I say "yes I can have it, but I won't, at least not now and when I can it will only be a tiny bite". I think that mind set is helping me not feel deprived. I don't know if I dump on fat or sugar and I don't want to know right now. I hope I dump on anything off plan. Right now I assume I will! It scares me that I might not dump but believing I will at this point is good aversion therapy even if it's hypothetical. My brain believes those things not on plan are not good choices for me.

I'm doing what I'm supposed to do now so that when the hard days come, and I know they will, I will have an established routine to help me stay on track. Period. No other option! I'm not judging anyone who chooses to do differently. We all have choices. My choice is setting myself up for success not failure. I had surgery to get healthy. Right now eating off plan is a choice to fail or at least not be as successful as possible.

Again, this is a great thread!!! Thanks for starting and continuing it!

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I feel blessed to have found this forum. I´m not alone in my struggles and I can benefit from the experiences of others. Thanks Claire for this thread :)

 

I´m 14 months post-op and falling back into depression and cravings for all things sweet and flouery.

 

The end of the honeymoon period is SO HARD, so disappointing, heart-breaking even. I´ve struggled with obesity and depression since I was 10 so when a few months after surgery I could finally keep food/weightloss/fat/shame/discomfort out of my mind for more than an hour at a time, I was in heaven. I controled what I ate and food was no longer controlling me. I was so surprised at all the things I could do, all the plans I made, how productive and happy I became. I thought to myself: So this is what normal people feel like?!?! Feeling normal is great! Do I get to be normal?!! Please God let me be normal, don´t take this away from me.

 

Well, it´s over. I´m back to the old me. I´m obese, although it doesn´t show in the mirror -yet. I´m depressed, although not yet suicidal. I´m gaining weight and obsessed with food again. Dante should have described this as one of the rings of hell. For close to a year before my surgery I was dead but still breathing, I remember the feeling very vividly and that´s giving me panic attacks just thinking I could be headed that way.

 

I had lost all the weight twice before my surgery. I did it the old fashioned way: exercise like crazy, keep my mouth shut. It didn´t last. So, will the benefits of my surgery last? Will I be back to ground zero in no time? I´m terrified.  

 

I keep eating healthy: meat/chicken/egg, dairy, veggies and some fruit. I keep working out although going out the door has been hard lately. If I overeat, I try to make up the next day by cutting down on the calories a bit. But it feels so much like before... It feels so hopeless. 

 

Honestly, I feel like I flew very high only to fall harder.

 

I want to be optimistic, I want to feel well again and I think your testimonies will help me. 

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This is a great thread!! I really appreciate the honesty and emphasis on following the rules and sticking to plan...period. I'm terrified by the thought that I may not make it to my goal before the honeymoon is over. The surgeon's number is about 20 pounds higher than mine. I'm four months out. I've not had a bite or sip of anything that is off plan. I exercise at least 5 days a week both cardio and weights.

I'm determined not to go off plan even a little bit until I'm at goal and maintaining a while. Maybe longer. I'll reevaluate at that time.

When asked if I can have this or that I say "yes I can have it, but I won't, at least not now and when I can it will only be a tiny bite". I think that mind set is helping me not feel deprived. I don't know if I dump on fat or sugar and I don't want to know right now. I hope I dump on anything off plan. Right now I assume I will! It scares me that I might not dump but believing I will at this point is good aversion therapy even if it's hypothetical. My brain believes those things not on plan are not good choices for me.

I'm doing what I'm supposed to do now so that when the hard days come, and I know they will, I will have an established routine to help me stay on track. Period. No other option! I'm not judging anyone who chooses to do differently. We all have choices. My choice is setting myself up for success not failure. I had surgery to get healthy. Right now eating off plan is a choice to fail or at least not be as successful as possible.

Again, this is a great thread!!! Thanks for starting and continuing it!

RIGHT ON!

 

Best,

Claire

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I feel blessed to have found this forum. I´m not alone in my struggles and I can benefit from the experiences of others. Thanks Claire for this thread :)

 

I´m 14 months post-op and falling back into depression and cravings for all things sweet and flouery.

 

The end of the honeymoon period is SO HARD, so disappointing, heart-breaking even. I´ve struggled with obesity and depression since I was 10 so when a few months after surgery I could finally keep food/weightloss/fat/shame/discomfort out of my mind for more than an hour at a time, I was in heaven. I controled what I ate and food was no longer controlling me. I was so surprised at all the things I could do, all the plans I made, how productive and happy I became. I thought to myself: So this is what normal people feel like?!?! Feeling normal is great! Do I get to be normal?!! Please God let me be normal, don´t take this away from me.

 

Well, it´s over. I´m back to the old me. I´m obese, although it doesn´t show in the mirror -yet. I´m depressed, although not yet suicidal. I´m gaining weight and obsessed with food again. Dante should have described this as one of the rings of hell. For close to a year before my surgery I was dead but still breathing, I remember the feeling very vividly and that´s giving me panic attacks just thinking I could be headed that way.

 

I had lost all the weight twice before my surgery. I did it the old fashioned way: exercise like crazy, keep my mouth shut. It didn´t last. So, will the benefits of my surgery last? Will I be back to ground zero in no time? I´m terrified.  

 

I keep eating healthy: meat/chicken/egg, dairy, veggies and some fruit. I keep working out although going out the door has been hard lately. If I overeat, I try to make up the next day by cutting down on the calories a bit. But it feels so much like before... It feels so hopeless. 

 

Honestly, I feel like I flew very high only to fall harder.

 

I want to be optimistic, I want to feel well again and I think your testimonies will help me. 

I don't know if I mentioned this here on T-T, but I'm a Certified Master Life Coach, and my mind went to my professional self when I read this post.  You don't have to answer t his, of course, but I'm interested to know how this thread is  helping you.  I am so sorry that you are feeling such despair.

 

C.

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I feel blessed to have found this forum. I´m not alone in my struggles and I can benefit from the experiences of others. Thanks Claire for this thread :)

 

I´m 14 months post-op and falling back into depression and cravings for all things sweet and flouery.

 

The end of the honeymoon period is SO HARD, so disappointing, heart-breaking even. I´ve struggled with obesity and depression since I was 10 so when a few months after surgery I could finally keep food/weightloss/fat/shame/discomfort out of my mind for more than an hour at a time, I was in heaven. I controled what I ate and food was no longer controlling me. I was so surprised at all the things I could do, all the plans I made, how productive and happy I became. I thought to myself: So this is what normal people feel like?!?! Feeling normal is great! Do I get to be normal?!! Please God let me be normal, don´t take this away from me.

 

Well, it´s over. I´m back to the old me. I´m obese, although it doesn´t show in the mirror -yet. I´m depressed, although not yet suicidal. I´m gaining weight and obsessed with food again. Dante should have described this as one of the rings of hell. For close to a year before my surgery I was dead but still breathing, I remember the feeling very vividly and that´s giving me panic attacks just thinking I could be headed that way.

 

I had lost all the weight twice before my surgery. I did it the old fashioned way: exercise like crazy, keep my mouth shut. It didn´t last. So, will the benefits of my surgery last? Will I be back to ground zero in no time? I´m terrified.  

 

I keep eating healthy: meat/chicken/egg, dairy, veggies and some fruit. I keep working out although going out the door has been hard lately. If I overeat, I try to make up the next day by cutting down on the calories a bit. But it feels so much like before... It feels so hopeless. 

 

Honestly, I feel like I flew very high only to fall harder.

 

I want to be optimistic, I want to feel well again and I think your testimonies will help me.

I have struggled with depression since I was a teen.

If you are not seeing a therapist please consider doing so.

If you are not on meds please consider seeing a psychiatrist for a consult about meds. You will need to find a psychiatrist who understands absorption issues post bypass, but please seek help now.

This forum is a wonderful place for many reasons but I believe you need "live" help and support from professionals.

You frighten me when you say you are not suicidal "yet".

Please get help before you are suicidal. If you do feel suicidal, go to the nearest emergency room and don't leave until you get the help you need.

Best...

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I don't know if I mentioned this here on T-T, but I'm a Certified Master Life Coach, and my mind went to my professional self when I read this post.  You don't have to answer t his, of course, but I'm interested to know how this thread is  helping you.  I am so sorry that you are feeling such despair.

 

C.

This threat is helping me because I see that most bariatric patients experience the same (the honeymoon doesn´t last forever) so it´s not a personal fail but something that inevitably happens. It also helps me to see people who are further out and still keeping their weight down. It makes me think it´s possible.

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I have struggled with depression since I was a teen.

If you are not seeing a therapist please consider doing so.

If you are not on meds please consider seeing a psychiatrist for a consult about meds. You will need to find a psychiatrist who understands absorption issues post bypass, but please seek help now.

This forum is a wonderful place for many reasons but I believe you need "live" help and support from professionals.

You frighten me when you say you are not suicidal "yet".

Please get help before you are suicidal. If you do feel suicidal, go to the nearest emergency room and don't leave until you get the help you need.

Best...

I am seeing a psychiatrist. Today I have an appointment. I was on meds pre-op, but was able to stop cold turkey after the operation. I felt so well that I naively thought I was cured.

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I've been silent for a while now, but these past few posts and some posts from another thread,have gotten my attention. Some thoughts from someone (me) almost three years out who is still below goal, still eating (mostly) according to plan, and now training for a marathon.

 

1. I am an addict. I was obese. If we call my addiction "obesity," than I am a recovering obese person. The 12 step folks never call themselves cured, they are in recovery. I am in recovery and the days I forget that, and start thinking of myself as cured, or normal, are the days I tend to make less healthy food choices. That is hard to accept, but being overweight and having obesity (i.e., having an addiction) was even harder.

 

2. The honeymoon period was sort of like the addict's "pink cloud." I thought my tiny appetite and my aversion to certain foods and my ability to rise above all food temptations was going to last forever. Wrong. And that is why it was so important to set habits when it was easy.

 

2. The honeymoon period is great. What it taught me was my triggers, my stinkin' thinkin', and many other things. We could start a thread, I'm sure, and have all kinds of triggers and stinkin' thinkin' listed. It might even be fun and informative.What was bad, for me, about the honeymoon, was that at one point I got too far below my goal, so I added certain healthy things to keep my calorie count up. Now the honeymoon is over, and those extra calories are extra again, so I have to be more circumspect about including them on my menu.

 

3. I truly believe that the diet mentality (that is,the mindset that "I'll start 'being good' again on Monday or after the holidays or after vacation") is a problem. That is what got me over 250 pounds. I don't diet anymore. But I do make wiser choices AS SOON AS the scale creeps up or the clothes feel tight. The recovering alcoholics I know do not slip off the wagon and say "I'll get sober again on Monday." Granted, the sip of alcohol is probably more detrimental than the bite of cake is to the addict, but the point is to get right back on the wagon. Immediately. It's not a diet. It's a lifestyle, It's a commitment.

 

4. As has been said over and over on this forum, this is not easy. It is hard. At times it seems almost impossible. There may be some who never find recovering from obesity a burden. But I would imagine that most of us who are farther than  2 years out recognize the burden we carry. FWIW, I too have struggled with depression and obesity my whole life. Some days are hard; some days are easy. But I am always, and will always be, in recovery from obesity and depression, unless I choose to not be in recovery anymore. I take and ask for help now in a way I did not before I was in recovery. And that is a huge difference. When I was overweight, I could not ask for help with my addiction. Now that I am in recovery, It is much easier. 

 

This is indeed a great thread. It keeps it real.

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Well said, Molly January, the road is long...

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I've been silent for a while now, but these past few posts and some posts from another thread,have gotten my attention. Some thoughts from someone (me) almost three years out who is still below goal, still eating (mostly) according to plan, and now training for a marathon.

 

1. I am an addict. I was obese. If we call my addiction "obesity," than I am a recovering obese person. The 12 step folks never call themselves cured, they are in recovery. I am in recovery and the days I forget that, and start thinking of myself as cured, or normal, are the days I tend to make less healthy food choices. That is hard to accept, but being overweight and having obesity (i.e., having an addiction) was even harder.

 

2. The honeymoon period was sort of like the addict's "pink cloud." I thought my tiny appetite and my aversion to certain foods and my ability to rise above all food temptations was going to last forever. Wrong. And that is why it was so important to set habits when it was easy.

 

2. The honeymoon period is great. What it taught me was my triggers, my stinkin' thinkin', and many other things. We could start a thread, I'm sure, and have all kinds of triggers and stinkin' thinkin' listed. It might even be fun and informative.What was bad, for me, about the honeymoon, was that at one point I got too far below my goal, so I added certain healthy things to keep my calorie count up. Now the honeymoon is over, and those extra calories are extra again, so I have to be more circumspect about including them on my menu.

 

3. I truly believe that the diet mentality (that is,the mindset that "I'll start 'being good' again on Monday or after the holidays or after vacation") is a problem. That is what got me over 250 pounds. I don't diet anymore. But I do make wiser choices AS SOON AS the scale creeps up or the clothes feel tight. The recovering alcoholics I know do not slip off the wagon and say "I'll get sober again on Monday." Granted, the sip of alcohol is probably more detrimental than the bite of cake is to the addict, but the point is to get right back on the wagon. Immediately. It's not a diet. It's a lifestyle, It's a commitment.

 

4. As has been said over and over on this forum, this is not easy. It is hard. At times it seems almost impossible. There may be some who never find recovering from obesity a burden. But I would imagine that most of us who are farther than  2 years out recognize the burden we carry. FWIW, I too have struggled with depression and obesity my whole life. Some days are hard; some days are easy. But I am always, and will always be, in recovery from obesity and depression, unless I choose to not be in recovery anymore. I take and ask for help now in a way I did not before I was in recovery. And that is a huge difference. When I was overweight, I could not ask for help with my addiction. Now that I am in recovery, It is much easier. 

 

This is indeed a great thread. It keeps it real.

 

 
Molly, I agree totally!  Your perspective was mine exactly after 2 years or so post op.
 
Now, at past 8 years post op, and at my lowest weight (the best weight for me), my perspective is a bit different.  As I look back, I realize how we humans tend to complicate tasks, easy and difficult ones.  I agree this is an overwhelming task at first - a trauma to the body and the mind.  BUT
 
At first I put blinders on, had tunnel visions.  A food addict all of my life, with yoyo dieting, I saw this as my last chance, at 67 (I'm now 75).  What the first year did for me - it  caused me to form habits that would cause me to lose weight, and then maintain it.  I was determined.  It was the most difficult thing I have ever done, for sure.  After the first year, I was still a bit shaky, and so focused on what I ate that I made myself and everyone else crazy.  Over time that softened (at least it appears so - I'm still relentlous)..  Eight years post op, it's just who/what I am. 
 
My message here is that we tend to over analyze and become paralyzed and so stressed in this journey.  It's only natural. 
 
I totally agree with you, Molly, that it isn't about going off the wagon and then dieting like crazy.  Here is what I do.  I go "off the wagon" in a calculated way.  For example, I had Chinese Food (yes, the fried kind) recently.  The next day I simply went back to my normal eating habits.  I never even thought about "dieting"- I just started to do what I do as far as food inake that I normally do.  Never diet.  That's what normal for me.  That is what thin people do.  And to consider myself with the mindset of a "thin person" is unbelievable for me, a lifelong foodaholic. 
 
So here it is - take each day, one at a time.  Follow guidelines.  Drink lots of water.  Laugh a lot.  Reach out to others (sometimes people who didn't know you obese are better than those who judged you before).  Surround yourself with positive people, people who encourage you.  Express gratitude for the opportunity that this tool has given you.  AND DON'T OVERTHINK.
 
And one more thing...yesterday is GONE.  Today and the future are what matters.  It's not too late.
 
For the lovely lady who is in so much pain who recently posted, my heart goes out to  you.  And I agree that professonal help is called for.
 
With compassion,
Claire
 

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Exactly, Claire! I'm not sure where we differ in our perspective. I do not obsess, either. Like my surgeon said, you want to enjoy your life. He also said, be vigilant, not obsessive. It's just that I can never forget I am in recovery. The only thing I still say absolutely no to is refined sugar. The number of bits of dessert I have had over the past 33 months  I can count on one hand. But that is me. I know my biggest weakness. What I didn't say above that I'd like to add now is that immediately after surgery and for the months following people respected my choices as if it were one of the ten commandments--Thou shalt not question Molly's food decisions. I encouraged that and to this day nobody pressures me to have just one bite or just to try something. So holidays, vacation, parties, ball games--they're all the same. If it's a day I need to cut back, I just do. If not, I eat what I need, and have that fried Chinese if I choose to--with eyes wide open. Thanks, Claire, for your continued support and compassion for everyone who comes to this thread.

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Exactly, Claire! I'm not sure where we differ in our perspective. I do not obsess, either. Like my surgeon said, you want to enjoy your life. He also said, be vigilant, not obsessive. It's just that I can never forget I am in recovery. The only thing I still say absolutely no to is refined sugar. The number of bits of dessert I have had over the past 33 months  I can count on one hand. But that is me. I know my biggest weakness. What I didn't say above that I'd like to add now is that immediately after surgery and for the months following people respected my choices as if it were one of the ten commandments--Thou shalt not question Molly's food decisions. I encouraged that and to this day nobody pressures me to have just one bite or just to try something. So holidays, vacation, parties, ball games--they're all the same. If it's a day I need to cut back, I just do. If not, I eat what I need, and have that fried Chinese if I choose to--with eyes wide open. Thanks, Claire, for your continued support and compassion for everyone who comes to this thread.

Molly, you are so very welcome - and I do think that you and I are indeed very similar in perspective.  Maybe I'm just more used to it, with all the passage of time. :)

 

Best,

Claire

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How do you know the honeymoon period is over? I'm gonna be really sad if I'm done.

Edited by Raeme

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Happy thanksgiving day Clare and everybody on this tread.

I really enjoy reading all these wonderful insightful posts.

I don't think I had a honeymoon period. What I lost was a slow and hard fight against my fat.

I think I was pretty strict with my self in keeping my diet. My surgeon give it to me.

I was told my weight loss is slow because I am old. Oh well even the good Lord cant do anything about that.

I still have at least 25 lbs. to loose, maybe more. To be "normal" I should be bellow 132 lbs.

Well maybe in an other year I will get there.

Unfortunately all of the sudden my pancreas stopped working properly.

My type 2 diabetes turned into type 1. Now I have to take insulin injections.

At the end of December I will see a specialist. I hope he will give me a diet to control my diabetes,

and also help me loose some more weight, I am afraid of insulin, it make people gain weight.

So far, so good. I am injecting myself for about a month and did not gain any weight.

I did not loose any either.

The Lord bless you all.

Gabriella

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Gabriella congratulations on your progress.  I don't know if it's about being old.  lots of people are "turtles" and have to fight for every pound.  I think you have done very well.  unfortunate about your diabetes and pancreas.  but imagine how much worse it would be with all that weight to carry around too!  I think you have done quite well. 

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Dear Walkat103!

Thank you for your kind words,

I appreciate them.

Gabriella

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Thank you so much for this post.  The main reason I joined this group is to find some support and accountability.  I live in fear of getting out of control of my eating and weight.  I workout 5 days/week, but I have become  less strict about my eating.  Sometimes I feel I eat too much.  I always get my protein and water in.  I stop when  I a full,  but is the too much.  Oh the madness.  How much should you eat at 16 months out?  I feel like I still have so many questions and no resources.  A typical day for me is a Luna  bar or Greek yogurt with protein granola.  Protein shake with 35 Grams peotein,  snack of cheese stick, brown rice triscuit, or carrots, or cottage cheese the supper.  What do yall think?  Some foods make me feel full quicker, I just wish I knew for a fact how much to eat and have I stretched my pouch, have I ruined my hard work?

Any help or advice is greatly appreciated. 

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doesn't sound to me like you are eating too much at all.  you might try tracking your food on something like myfitnesspal.com.  that will tell you if you are within your guidelines for protein, carbs and/or calories, etc.  if you stay within your guidelines you can't go wrong.  try browsing through the socialize forum for more info.

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Thank you so much for this post.  The main reason I joined this group is to find some support and accountability.  I live in fear of getting out of control of my eating and weight.  I workout 5 days/week, but I have become  less strict about my eating.  Sometimes I feel I eat too much.  I always get my protein and water in.  I stop when  I a full,  but is the too much.  Oh the madness.  How much should you eat at 16 months out?  I feel like I still have so many questions and no resources.  A typical day for me is a Luna  bar or Greek yogurt with protein granola.  Protein shake with 35 Grams peotein,  snack of cheese stick, brown rice triscuit, or carrots, or cottage cheese the supper.  What do yall think?  Some foods make me feel full quicker, I just wish I knew for a fact how much to eat and have I stretched my pouch, have I ruined my hard work?

Any help or advice is greatly appreciated. 

Hello, and I'm so glad you reached out!

From my experience (going on 9 years post op), the best thing you can do for yourself is to find a weight loss surgery group somewhere near you.  If your surgeon has one, that would be the best.  Even if it means traveling a distance, it will be worth it.  You sound very alone in this process, and you will get relief from being with people of like minds and interests.  Second, I suggest you go to a nutritionist to discuss your concerns on a personal level.  It is so worth it - it gave me a clear road to follow, and I am still at my lowest weight.  I still follow the nutritionist's guidelines - they were very explicit.  If your surgeon has one in his/her practice, that is the one to go to.  If not, perhaps they can refer you to one.  If you have already seen one, visit her/him again.

Speaking for myself, it is not possible to determine whether you are on the right track with your food or not.  And keep in mind this is a mental battle just as much as a physical one.  If you FEEL out of control, you likely are (my opinion). 

I wish you the very best!

Claire

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Happy thanksgiving day Clare and everybody on this tread.

I really enjoy reading all these wonderful insightful posts.

I don't think I had a honeymoon period. What I lost was a slow and hard fight against my fat.

I think I was pretty strict with my self in keeping my diet. My surgeon give it to me.

I was told my weight loss is slow because I am old. Oh well even the good Lord cant do anything about that.

I still have at least 25 lbs. to loose, maybe more. To be "normal" I should be bellow 132 lbs.

Well maybe in an other year I will get there.

Unfortunately all of the sudden my pancreas stopped working properly.

My type 2 diabetes turned into type 1. Now I have to take insulin injections.

At the end of December I will see a specialist. I hope he will give me a diet to control my diabetes,

and also help me loose some more weight, I am afraid of insulin, it make people gain weight.

So far, so good. I am injecting myself for about a month and did not gain any weight.

I did not loose any either.

The Lord bless you all.

Gabriella

Hello, Gabriella!

I'm just seeing your post, way past Thanksgiving! 

I'm not far behind you at 75, and I congratulate you on taking this journey.  The older one gets, the more difficult the decision 

You have an excellent mind set, and you will continue to do well because of it.

Best,

Claire

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Another person asked this, and I too want to know... how did any of you know your honeymoon period was over?

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In my case, the weightloss stopped, the cravings came back and then the weight started going up. I was able to eat pretty much anything without getting sick and I felt no restriction. That´s how my honeymoon period ended. Now it´s just as hard as before the surgery for me. I have to diet, quit carbs and excercise a lot.

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I knew it was over when my desire to lose was overshadowed by my desire for food.

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