Claire-in-Texas

The Honeymoon Period

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11 hours ago, Cheesehead said:

I lost all my weight in 9 months..I dropped 120+ pounds..  I was a “lightweight” to begin with.  My BMI was just barely 40..

@Cheesehead bragger! ;)

 

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Not sure about the honeymoon period. I lost all of my weight in one year, almost to the day. Since then, I've had to pile on the calories to avoid losing more - maybe still in the honeymoon period, then. I'm at 14 months out. I was extremely careful during the first year (and since then, tbh, but just eating a lot MORE of the healthy stuff). 

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@NerdyToothpick-why are you on a liquid diet? Are you ok?

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12 hours ago, Anita62 said:

@NerdyToothpick-why are you on a liquid diet? Are you ok?

@Anita62

I am a cautionary tale. I had a really bad day and gulped down beef I bought on a whim. I did not chew my food and threw up like I have never thrown up before. I irritated my stomach and esophagus. I also had some micro tears in my stomach. I’ve been on a liquid diet for three weeks. I had solid food today and it was fantastic. 

Kids, don’t do what I did. Chew your food!

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Wow!! I never knew how bad it could become. Take care of yourself. Glad you are back to food. 

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New here but great words of advice. The two people I know who have had this are 3years out and both keep saying don’t worry you can eat whatever you want in a year or two. That’s not what I want though! I hope to use this as an opportunity to really change. 

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4 minutes ago, PhotoBellaNJ said:

New here but great words of advice. The two people I know who have had this are 3years out and both keep saying don’t worry you can eat whatever you want in a year or two. That’s not what I want though! I hope to use this as an opportunity to really change. 

In my experience,  if you strictly stick to plan during the early months your taste buds will change to the point you just won't find the same pleasure in sweet or fatty foods anymore. Those who cheat on their plans early out though don't seem to get the same benefit that early abstinence offers.

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24 minutes ago, PhotoBellaNJ said:

........... The two people I know who have had this are 3years out and both keep saying don’t worry you can eat whatever you want in a year or two. That’s not what I want though! I hope to use this as an opportunity to really change. 

Sadly, there are a few who don't view their honeymoon period as a chance to make permanent dietary and lifestyle changes. 

Weight loss surgery will help anyone lose weight but it will never keep them there unless they stick to a healthy eating pattern (all the better with a bit of exercise).

17 minutes ago, Aussie Bear said:

In my experience,  if you strictly stick to plan during the early months your taste buds will change to the point you just won't find the same pleasure in sweet or fatty foods anymore. Those who cheat on their plans early out though don't seem to get the same benefit that early abstinence offers.

That's what one of our programme coordinators said and it stuck with me.  

I was a self confessed chocolate addict pre-op and and after I had my WLS I did not touch the stuff until I was pretty close to goal.  Well, I had one square (Lindt dark chocolate), and put the rest back in the fridge.  I think that one bar lasted me close to 5 months but it's been 3 or more years since I ate any chocolate.  It was nice - I enjoyed it but no longer has any hold on me - I can take it or leave it.  I guess that for me anyway, it's a case that absence does not make the heart grow fonder.

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On 8/31/2018 at 3:59 AM, cinwa said:

I enjoyed it but no longer has any hold on me 

That’s funny, because a square of two of very dark chocolate (Lindt 85% or 90%) is about the only treat I allow myself now! I was never a big chocoholic before, but it satisfies my sweet tooth now, and doesn’t tempt me enough to want to continue eating it beyond a square or two. It’s good, but it doesn’t trigger my cravings or snacky behavior.

I agree that totally abstaining from Entertainment Food for the first year was helpful to me - I am well aware of my ability to say no. It won’t kill me not to have something, even if it’s a delicious something. I feel bad for anyone thinking they could go back to eating whatever they want after a year or two. I know how easy it is to fool yourself into thinking everything is ok.

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10 hours ago, Jen581791 said:

That’s funny, because a square of two of very dark chocolate (Lindt 85% or 90%) is about the only treat I allow myself now! I was never a big chocoholic before, but it satisfies my sweet tooth now, and doesn’t tempt me enough to want to continue eating it beyond a square or two. It’s good, but it doesn’t trigger my cravings or snacky behavior.

I agree that totally abstaining from Entertainment Food for the first year was helpful to me - I am well aware of my ability to say no. It won’t kill me not to have something, even if it’s a delicious something. I feel bad for anyone thinking they could go back to eating whatever they want after a year or two. I know how easy it is to fool yourself into thinking everything is ok.

Jeepers, abstaining from Entertainment food for a year! Ack! BB has an alternative approach - integrate the delicious stuff into your life while continuing to strictly count your calories etc. Was in a Japanese restaurant a few nights ago with my wife, and we had gyoza (dumplings) filled with foie gras and wagyu beef. They were insanely delicious. I had ONE.  It was enough. But give up foie gras? Not thinking I can go back to eating whatever I want now, ... but isn't chocolate one of the Essential Elements of food, like water, salt, wine, and duck fat?? I mean, how can you cover your carefully weighed 4 ounce portion of poultry with Oaxacan mole if you eschew chocolate!? The hair on the back of my neck is standing straight up... :eek: Will attempt to recover from this by thawing a duck to confit...

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Ooh BurgundyBoy-you are a true foodie, huh?! I'd love to join at your dinner table!

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1 hour ago, ardita said:

Ooh BurgundyBoy-you are a true foodie, huh?! I'd love to join at your dinner table!

Ardita, you are most kind, I must confess that I am indeed a foodie. I belong to wine and food societies. I eat, and um er drink, extremely well. Labor Day is tomorrow and I am starting to make Boeuf Bourgogne for a mere 16 people who will show up so we can taste Grand Cru Burgundy wine (hence the BurgundyBoy moniker, which has to be the most idiotic one ever chosen for a weight loss support forum). Note, of course, that Boeuf Bourgogne is high in protein. I will be able to eat the Boeuf and let everyone else eat the bread and potatoes that will accompany dinner. The wines should be very beautiful, evocative and magisterial. 

Lurkers: Weight loss does not be you must eschew the beauty and deliciousness and delight that can be had in daily life consumption of food. It does mean you have to be honest with yourself and track your intake. At some local restaurants I have spoken to the chefs about my surgery and when I show up, the waiters point out what I can reasonably eat. You don't need to hide your success. Restaurants can not just "accommodate" you, they can strive to make you really really happy with small portions that fit your needs. Just tell them what you need!

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BurgundyBoy: I'll see you at 6? 

I agree, you can still eat well and enjoy food as a pleasure, as a delight. You just need to do so with consideration of your good health.

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1 hour ago, BurgundyBoy said:

Lurkers: Weight loss does not be you must eschew the beauty and deliciousness and delight that can be had in daily life consumption of food. It does mean you have to be honest with yourself and track your intake. 

You know, I did not get fat on foie gras and Oaxacan mole. I got fat from downing fistfuls of Cheetos and drinking Starbucks drinks that had 50 grams of sugar in them. I mean, I also ate the foie gras and Oaxacan mole, but that's not what did it. I'd so much rather eat a small, delicious meal and push my plate away each day for the rest of my life than go back to downing fistfuls of garbage. 

Also I can't live without decent cheese in my life, so if weight loss meant that I couldn't eat stinky cheese anymore, I would not have gone through with it. Haha! I think I'm leaning more toward your approach, BurgundyBoy. I even had a bite (one bite!) of a cupcake that was supposedly a VERY GOOD cupcake. It was.... a bit much actually. But I felt ok about taking a bite. I didn't need or want any more than that. Before I would have eaten 3. I can do moderation now, and I couldn't before, and I'm starting to see how that's a huge success for me. I PREFER moderation now. My stomach probably could have handled more than a bite of cupcake, but that's all I needed to know that it was sweet and chocolatey and cupcakey. I didn't want anything more than that. 

Edited by Cardamom77

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2 hours ago, BurgundyBoy said:

Lurkers: Weight loss does not be you must eschew the beauty and deliciousness and delight that can be had in daily life consumption of food.

Some of us find the eschewing to be a very useful tool for a while. While I salute your ability to moderate your intake of life's finer pleasures, I am better at abstaining - two very different ways of dealing with food. I don't really need to do that as much now that I'm at GW, and I do have entertainment food/treats now and again, but I definitely benefit from more of an abstention mentality on a daily basis. I make sure my meals and snacks are things I like to eat (I'm having greek yogurt with chopped fresh figs, chopped dates, and chopped pecans for breakfast today - I'm not living on gruel or something), but as for entertainment food, I basically stay away most of the time. One bite leads to another for me, I'm afraid.

Here's Gretchen Rubin's (from The Happiness Project) take on abstainers vs. moderators:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-happiness-project/201210/are-you-abstainer-or-moderator

 

 

Edited by Jen581791

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@Jen581791 that makes a lot of sense. Any time I’ve tried to abstain, I get tempted, then do the thing anyway, then think “I’ve failed!” and go right back to my old ways. I get too all-or-nothing with abstention. I think I’m definitely more of a moderation type. 

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1 hour ago, Cardamom77 said:

@Jen581791 that makes a lot of sense. Any time I’ve tried to abstain, I get tempted, then do the thing anyway, then think “I’ve failed!” and go right back to my old ways. I get too all-or-nothing with abstention. I think I’m definitely more of a moderation type. 

I think it’s powerful to know yourself and how you tick! And then work within that set of preferences :) 

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9 hours ago, Jen581791 said:

Some of us find the eschewing to be a very useful tool for a while. While I salute your ability to moderate your intake of life's finer pleasures, I am better at abstaining - two very different ways of dealing with food. I don't really need to do that as much now that I'm at GW, and I do have entertainment food/treats now and again, but I definitely benefit from more of an abstention mentality on a daily basis. I make sure my meals and snacks are things I like to eat (I'm having greek yogurt with chopped fresh figs, chopped dates, and chopped pecans for breakfast today - I'm not living on gruel or something), but as for entertainment food, I basically stay away most of the time. One bite leads to another for me, I'm afraid.

Here's Gretchen Rubin's (from The Happiness Project) take on abstainers vs. moderators:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-happiness-project/201210/are-you-abstainer-or-moderator

 

 

Jen - Nice post! - clearly I am in the "moderation" camp (at least today). My thinking about this was a bit inchoate, the Rubin article put it nicely.  On reflection there are foods that I do abstain from, though, so maybe a mix of approaches can exist within us. I LOVE good tortilla chips, but if I buy them -> I eat the whole bag. 

Now, about that definition of Entertainment food - are you suggesting that chopped fresh figs and dates aren't wonderful, indeed entertaining? :P 

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24 minutes ago, BurgundyBoy said:

are you suggesting that chopped fresh figs and dates aren't wonderful, indeed entertaining? 

They're entertaining, but basically they're not on my "no" list. When I say entertainment food, I mean food I am really just entertaining myself with - not seeking nutrition from - popcorn, let's say. Fruit works fine for me, and although I don't eat a whole lot of it, I have a bit every day. Oaxacan mole is also not on my banned list (I used to live in Oaxaca so I know how good it is!). I just have a bunch of things I basically don't eat, like candy, cake, baked goodies, etc. There are some other things I just can't have in the house - I may be OK with them in a public setting, but get me alone in a dark room with a box of Cheezits and something on TV, and there will be no more Cheezits when the lights go on. Similar with tortilla chips - I'll eat 5 at a restaurant, but a whole bag at home. I have a pretty good idea of what my danger zone foods are and stay away from them. Most of them are of the completely nutritionally void category. 

Basically, I'm the kind of person who has an easier time just saying a hard no than having just a bit of something. It was very easy during my active losing phase to just absolutely say no to all sweets, for example. It required no thinking from me, no flexing my self-control muscle. I think it would be nice to be a person who dealt with moderation better, but alas. Now I at least know myself well enough to give myself a break from difficult decision making on those things that make it hard for me.

 

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10 hours ago, Jen581791 said:

Some of us find the eschewing to be a very useful tool for a while. While I salute your ability to moderate your intake of life's finer pleasures, I am better at abstaining - two very different ways of dealing with food. I don't really need to do that as much now that I'm at GW, and I do have entertainment food/treats now and again, but I definitely benefit from more of an abstention mentality on a daily basis. ..............

.................

I've tried it both ways since my WLS almost 11 years ago and I have to admit, I'm in the camp of abstention too.  Maintaining my weight isn't the problem either way but I dislike the effects of hyperpalatable foods.

"The food environment has changed dramatically with the influx of hyperpalatable foods that are engineered in ways that appear to surpass the rewarding properties of traditional foods (e.g., vegetables, fruits, nuts) by increasing fat, sugar, salt, flavors, and food additives to high levels)". 

This is another good read:  How 'Hyperpalatable' Foods Could Turn You Into A Food Addict

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12 hours ago, cinwa said:

I've tried it both ways since my WLS almost 11 years ago and I have to admit, I'm in the camp of abstention too.  Maintaining my weight isn't the problem either way but I dislike the effects of hyperpalatable foods.

"The food environment has changed dramatically with the influx of hyperpalatable foods that are engineered in ways that appear to surpass the rewarding properties of traditional foods (e.g., vegetables, fruits, nuts) by increasing fat, sugar, salt, flavors, and food additives to high levels)". 

This is another good read:  How 'Hyperpalatable' Foods Could Turn You Into A Food Addict

Two great articles, @cinwa. I'd say my "no" foods fall pretty solidly in the "hyperpalatable" category: scientifically engineered to deliver a package of fat, sugar, and salt to my unsuspecting brain. 

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10 hours ago, Jen581791 said:

Two great articles, @cinwa. I'd say my "no" foods fall pretty solidly in the "hyperpalatable" category: scientifically engineered to deliver a package of fat, sugar, and salt to my unsuspecting brain. 

Other than cheese (which I pretty much eat daily) and maybe 2 - 3 squares of Lindt Excellence 90% dark chocolate since Christmas, I don't think I've eaten anything off the "hyperpalatable" list.

But being retired helps with that enormously.  If it isn't in the house, I can't be tempted.

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I am a moderation type person.  I will say this, I cannot have it in my house. So if I want M&M"s, a cupcake, or anything else I know is taboo I have to go get it. Sometimes the want pass and sometimes I go get it.  I still track my food so these things do go on my tracker.

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6 hours ago, cinwa said:

....  But being retired helps with that enormously.  If it isn't in the house, I can't be tempted.

Hmmm. Maybe I am more abstemious than I have been letting on. Cinwa your comment about things not being in the house got me thinking. My wife and I essentially eat no foods that we don't prepare from scratch - so the stuff that is hyperpalatable - the crap filled with fat, sugar, and salt - never gets in. Now here I have been, saying la la la I can eat a little foie gras, but truth be told there is a long list of things that I abstain from. Sigh. I hope you will not think of me as being two-faced, but rather just insufficiently thought out. 

Perhaps a decade ago, maybe 15, I swore off the vast majority of hyperpalatable foods recognizing their potency - but I still ate too much of the "regular" foods and gained weight. WLS really worked for me because it changes your sense of hunger, of satiety, and enforces volume restriction. M&Ms have never been exciting to me. (BBQ, now, that is dangerous stuff!). 

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Thankfully, it's rare that I ever overeat on protein (fish mostly) or fresh vegetables and salad.  I eat my serving and that's the end of it.  I was the treats I bought for my husband - ostensibly.

But like you, pretty much everything we eat is non-processed and prepared from scratch.  And since retiring, I've been canning and pickling a lot.  This morning I made and canned a load of fresh tomato sauce.  Tomorrow it's dill pickles. 

— 

you ever can Brussels sprouts?  Most in our family don’t like them.  But beg for jars of pickled ones..  me, I won’t touch them either way.  

Edited by Cheesehead

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