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7 weeks post op and I keep getting really bad nausea in the morning and sweats, I feel really rough. It doesn’t happen every day but I’m starting to notice a pattern that it’s when I eat a breakfast. Does anyone else get anything similar to this 

Edited by Miss newt
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  • Miss newt changed the title to Nausea & sweats

Get your hands on a blood glucose monitor and check your blood sugars before breakfast as well as 60, 90, and 120 minutes after. Nausea and sweating after eating are signs of hypoglycemia,  caused by late dumping. If that's your problem then you'll need to change what you're eating for breakfast to a lower carb option.

I deal with a very severe form of this, but in my case breakfast is the one meal it doesn't happen.

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i am a little further out but nausea was a big part of my life the first few months. the sweats relate to what i call mini dumping. its one of the signs your body is not reacting well to what you are eating. this is def. something to discuss with your doctor/nutritionist. i always start my day with drinking my water/tea and waiting for 1/2 hour before eating. then i eat a protein breakfast - eggs, cot cheese, etc. wishing you the best in your journey

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4 hours ago, nattie27 said:

 i always start my day with drinking my water/tea and waiting for 1/2 hour before eating. then i eat a protein breakfast - eggs, cot cheese, etc. wishing you the best in your journey

I do a similar thing. Start my morning with a green tea, followed by a latte, then about 30 minutes later have a high protien Greek yoghurt topped with a few berries and a homemade granola mix which I make predominantly with roasted nuts and seeds. If I'm away from home it's a bacon and eggs morning. Including about 30g of protien with each meal is (for me anyway) the key to not having a sugar high flooded by a crash later. For those of us that struggle with post operative blood sugars issues, we really do have to make the change to high protien, moderate fat, low carb eating. Fortunately for the majority of those that struggle with dumping, it does tend to go away after a year or two. Those who don't though, really need to get an endocrinologist to help manage ongoing issues, because it does have long term implications for health along similar lines to diabetes...just with the opposite presentation. 

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