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Reptar Kay

Is Depression Normal After Surgery?

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I had VSG on 9-18-19, and I regret it so far. I really hope it gets better for me, because so far, I believe it has completely ruined my life. I am much more unhappy now, than before. And I know this is not typical, as everyone who I know who's had it at my support group, hasn't felt this way. So I don't know where to turn to for help, and compassion, because I feel so alone. I'm 6'3, and was 385lbs at my heaviest, and weigh 269lbs currently. That sounds like a big drop, but I have only lost about 21lbs post-op in 2 weeks. When I lost over 80 pre-op. So the surgery hasn't been very helpful in my weight loss at all. I lost 20lbs my first week, but have only lost 1 pound in my second week.

I thought this surgery was going to change my life for the better, and save me from diabetes, hypertension, stroke, etc. And that it will also help me keep off the weight long-term. Because I had been obese my entire life, from when I was 5 years old. But I believe it's made my life worse, and that I've made the biggest mistake in my life. But looking online, and in my real life, and in all my pre-surgery research, nobody else seems to feel that way.

I now have to worry about things I've never had to before. I now I have to drink water all the time, so I don't become dehydrated. Which I didn't think was going to be a big deal because I drank water all the time. But now it's become a chore. I've never had to worry about dehydration in my life. And now I have to worry about vitamin deficiency, and protein deficiency. Something I never had to worry about before. And I simply can't eat enough of the required amount of protein. Something I didn't consider, and I never had a problem getting protein shakes down before. And now I'm forever worried that my teeth are going to rot and fall out because I simply can't drink the protein shakes, and that my body will be weakened because I have no protein. And I also can't take pills. I don't know if that will last forever. But right now they need to be crushed, and they taste horrible. I haven't eaten food yet. But the drinking seems to be a much bigger problem for me, as I am having difficulty with the new drinking regimen. 

And the worst is how it has effected my emotionally. I am going through extreme postsurgery depression. I gave up everything I love forever to have this surgery (carbonated beverages, caffine, asprin, straws, eating and drinking concurrently, eating fast, gulping down drinks, chewing gum, etc), because I thought this was going to be the best decision I've ever made for my health. But so far all I've gotten from it is extreme depression, withdrawal, bloating, stomach pains, anxiety attacks from the regret. Luckily I never smoked or drank alcohol to begin with. So I don't have withdrawals from that.

But carbonated drinks has been the hardest part. I haven't drank soda is 14 years, when I switched to seltzer. And I fell in love with seltzer. Perrier was my favorite drink, and I drank it all the time. I miss it so much. But I thought that giving it up, was going to be a decision that would make my life better. I really hope that this depression is temporary. But I know a lot of people who have had VSG, and they didn't experience any of this emotional depression. 

And anywhere I go, everyone seems to feel the exact opposite that I do. And I can't seem to find support anywhere. All I've gotten is a lot of "that's just how life is now, adjust." I know that. I know I can't do anything about it. But I'm actually suffering from pure clinical depression, and I feel like I'm the only one, and that it will never go away. 

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this requires more of an answer then i can do in the next few minutes before i have to leave.  I'll get you a good response tonight, check back and don't lose hope.

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10 hours ago, Reptar Kay said:

I had VSG on 9-18-19, and I regret it so far.

So it's just been a few days and you're still dealing with post-op stuff. It will get better in time. A short time.

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But I'm actually suffering from pure clinical depression, and I feel like I'm the only one, and that it will never go away. 

You're not the only one. The people dealing with depression or depressive episodes are definitely out there. If you're diagnosed with depression, medication might be something to consider if you're not already taking an antidepressant.

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And I can't seem to find support anywhere. All I've gotten is a lot of "that's just how life is now, adjust." I know that. I know I can't do anything about it.

I'd take a bet that you don't want to hear what I'm going to say now and you already seem to know it yourself anyway: they're absolutely right. This is your life now. Deal with it.

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I gave up everything I love forever to have this surgery (carbonated beverages, caffine, asprin, straws, eating and drinking concurrently, eating fast, gulping down drinks, chewing gum, etc)

If it's helpful in some kind of way: there are different protocols out there.

We were allowed caffeine 4 weeks post-op. There are surgeons who don't mind carbonated beverages if they're calorie free. About chewing gum and using straws - can't remember someone even mentioning these things in the hospital I got surgery at. I'm chewing gum regularly, I drink carbonated (almost) calorie free beverages and I drink a gazillion cups of black coffee a day.

It might also be helpful not to listen to the holier-than-the-pope zealots out there, especially if you're feeling vulnerable to their blubbering.

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It will get better.  But if you are truly depressed please find help.

many people actually find straws help to get more liquid in, just don’t slup or gulp so you get air in.  I was a Diet Pepsi a holic.  I no long like pop.  I don’t like plain water, I add flavored drink sticks to add flavor to water.  

Pearly out caffeine acts as a diaretic which could hehydtate you quicker.  I was told as long as I could get 64 ounces of non cafinated liquid in that caffeine was ok.  

I still eat quickly.  I fill up quickly.  I walk away from the table (no grazing).  I used to have a quart sized glass that I could gulp in seconds.  Well, that ability is gone.  I can handle 8 ounces.  

I was told chewing gum was ok-just don’t swallow it or take excess air in while chewing it.  

This has become the new normal.  It will get better as you adjust and can finally eat something.  I’m a horribly picky eater (always have been). It’s only gotten worse.  So there were only a very few things I would eat or drink on the post op liquids, mushy phase..it got old fast.  But I knew I had to adjust because there was no going back.  These days I really don’t like food.  I eat a lot of fruit, Greek yogurt, cheese, protein bars..  my tastes still change even this far out..

hang in there..

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23 hours ago, Reptar Kay said:

I'm 6'3, and was 385lbs at my heaviest, and weigh 269lbs currently. That sounds like a big drop, but I have only lost about 21lbs post-op in 2 weeks. When I lost over 80 pre-op.

Some of the folks in my pre-surgery class had to take a 16 week nutrition class before the pre-op class of 6 weeks (i only had to do the 6 week one), and they had to be losing weight the entire time during both of those.  if that is close to the route you took, then congrats on losing 80 yourself ahead of time, that is a monumental accomplishment.  likewise losing 20 lbs in 2 weeks post op is also great.  That is about where i was 2 weeks after.  Everyone loses weight differently, the surgeries only accelerate that.  One of the folks in my class had surgery 2 days before me, and only last week started to lose weight.  some people actually GAIN weight before losing after the procedures.  there is no absolute here.

 

23 hours ago, Reptar Kay said:

I thought this surgery was going to change my life for the better, and save me from diabetes, hypertension, stroke, etc. And that it will also help me keep off the weight long-term. Because I had been obese my entire life, from when I was 5 years old. But I believe it's made my life worse, and that I've made the biggest mistake in my life. But looking online, and in my real life, and in all my pre-surgery research, nobody else seems to feel that way.

oh it will, but you have to give yourself time.  just think, you're already a 100lbs lighter than you were before you started this.  i'm about 75lbs lighter from when i started, and i can already tell you i sleep better, i move better, i walk better, and i'm in generally a better mood as i'm not in constant pain all the time.  long term, the surgery will help you keep the weight off, but you can also put it back on and stretch your new stomach out if you aren't careful.  this is a lifestyle change, not a magic band aid fix.  you have to have enough discipline going forward to abstain, or take some things in extreme moderation.

 

23 hours ago, Reptar Kay said:

now have to worry about things I've never had to before. I now I have to drink water all the time, so I don't become dehydrated. Which I didn't think was going to be a big deal because I drank water all the time. But now it's become a chore. I've never had to worry about dehydration in my life. And now I have to worry about vitamin deficiency, and protein deficiency. Something I never had to worry about before. And I simply can't eat enough of the required amount of protein. Something I didn't consider, and I never had a problem getting protein shakes down before. And now I'm forever worried that my teeth are going to rot and fall out because I simply can't drink the protein shakes, and that my body will be weakened because I have no protein. And I also can't take pills. I don't know if that will last forever. But right now they need to be crushed, and they taste horrible. I haven't eaten food yet. But the drinking seems to be a much bigger problem for me, as I am having difficulty with the new drinking regimen. 

you had to worry about them before, it was just that you had access to them in greater volume, and from more than one source.  In the first week after i got back home, i would set an alarm for every 2 hours all night long, and wake up to sip some water to make sure i was getting enough in.  as time went by, i didn't have to do that.  While still on the clear liquids, i had found that there was only 1 clear protein brand i could even stomach slightly, and that was premier protein's clear brand, the orange mango one i think.  even still, it was a chore to drink them, i still have a few in the fridge that i will probably never drink..

don't feel like you have to drink a gallon of water a day, and eat a side of beef.  that will also come in time, do what you can, and as long as you aren't feeling worse because you aren't hitting those metrics, it WILL improve over time.  I can't eat the 60g of protein i'm supposed to now, and that number might go up soon.  but i can drink a premier protein (or the walmart brand equate) shake which has 30g, and then i can get the other 30 thru out the day.  Unfortunately, if you haven't found the things that work for you yet, you just have to keep trying things until you do.  I've become a HUGE fan of jerky since i could eat real food again, and thats a big protein punch in a small package.

and i haven't been able to swallow but 1 pill my whole life, i have massive gag reflex.  i've always chewed them, ground them, gotten suspensions or liquid or child versions of medications.  you can get a chewable multivitamin, and chewable starburst like calcium supplements, and that's all you need.  any other pills you're on are something else, you'd have to explain what those are.

23 hours ago, Reptar Kay said:

And the worst is how it has effected my emotionally. I am going through extreme postsurgery depression. I gave up everything I love forever to have this surgery

this is normal, and is also normal for far more things than WLS.  Wait til you get to experience post-partum depression from a personal or outsider viewpoint.

I had a series of "last meals" before the 2 week window before surgery, in fact, i had 1 2 days before surgery.  in these, i invited friends and family and had my last nachos, my last deep dish pizza, my last craft beer day, etc.  I made a big deal out of it.  2 days before surgery i took the family out for chocolate eclairs and black forest torte for breakfast, and then my favorite off menu pizza at my favorite restaurant for dinner.  you still have to live your life.  Our instructor in that 6 week class had a saying that is going to ring just as true for you as it does for me.  she would often say, "not never, just not now".

i had "relationships" with all the bad foods, chips and queso is my kryptonite, beer, scotch, pizza, soda, ICE CREAM.  but those things also all got me to where gastric sleeve was the final option as well.  have i had those foods since surgery? yes. but usually a single bite here, and there.  enough to get the taste, and be done with it.  being healthier and having less health problems is more important to me than any of those.  I went from drinking easily a gallon of soda a day, to a glass or 2 of tea, and otherwise just have a handful of crystal light drink packets always near me.  over time, the drinking water all day gets easier, i just carry a gatorade bottle around w/ me and refill it as needed.

many people say the straw thing isn't even a thing.  I guess it depends on whether you tend to suck in a bunch of air or not.  and i think its more of a thing if you had bypass instead of sleeve due to that having a much smaller pouch.  give it a try if you need to, just go slowly.  go slowly with everything, try new things, have a bite or a drink or chew gum, or whatever it is you need to do to maintain sanity, just do all of those in extreme moderation.  You started this journey for a reason, you just have to remind yourself of that reason.

I told my wife and family/friends early on, to not change their habits around me, but that they needed to be aware of my limitations.  i think maybe if you're more open with folks about what's going on, and what they can expect from you, and go at it in that manner, you'll see a different response from them.  if you're going at it from a "poor me" perspective, you'll continue to get grief.  Everyone has their own crap they're going through, yours is just a different kind of crap.

 

 

if you're depressed because life is different than it was, i think that's normal and healthy, but it'll go away soon.  if you're depressed medically and you're thinking destructive thoughts, or wanting to sabotage yourself intentionally, then you need to go talk to your doctor/surgeon immediately.  drugs are not always the answer, and i'm personally not a fan of medicine through medication, but it can help at least in the short term.

 

other things you can do?  get outside, go do activities you couldn't do when you were fatter, whatever, just get out of the house, get out of that cabin fever mentality.

 

if none of your friends are being supportive, maybe you need some new friends.  there's always hope, don't give up on yourself.  You've already proven by undergoing this process, that you haven't given up, and won't give up.

 

so don't.

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Came onto the site today & looked up “Depression” because I too experienced this especially the first 2 weeks post op. I got mine done 8/26/19. I am a little over a month out & this past week I was finally feeling better as I started eating more solids, but today, once again I had those bad feelings, then I get anxious & feel like I may never be happy again. I guess, in a way I’m trying to tell you that you are not alone, that there is more of us out here. I too immediately had regret the surgery after it was done & at times still do, but then now I have glimpses of joy when I see myself in the mirror (which 2 weeks post op I’d never thought I would feel). I’ve done a lot of research, & these emotional ups & downs & the “buyer’s remorse” are more common than you think. Also, make sure you check your vitamins, B12 deficiency can cause depression & just make you feel gloomy, I took a B12 shot at a medical spa & IT WORKED WONDERS, at least for a bit. & when it comes to taking vitamins, I take the Flinstones Complete (the chewable ones), you can get them in any pharmacy & many grocery stores. I know you will get through this, & I will too ! We got this ! I had been feeling anxious & down all day & reading this took me back to about 3 weeks ago because I felt the exact same way & now I can see that slowly I have been getting better, so I know you will too. 

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The immediate postop period is the most difficult time because you don't feel well, and you don't have your usual comforts (food) to use to feel better.  The more you think about that, especially in terms of forever, the worse it feels and you can spiral downwards in a hurry.  Plus, hormones and such are wonky with fat loss and that certainly contributes to mood.

Here's the GOOD NEWS:  the reason you have to give up so much right now is that your little baby sleeve is healing. Once healing is accomplished, your restriction is eased significantly.  I drink coffee and I just finished a Peach flavored Bubly...love me some sparkling water.  I drink from a straw, I gulp water, and I chew gum every single day all day. Oh and I occasionally have alcohol.  The life of gloom you have painted in your head is a lie...you have a beautiful gloriously healthy future ahead waiting just around the corner!

I am almost 5 years out from sleeve surgery and I can tell you that the things I have given up (eating an entire pizza or box of doughnuts or bag of cookies) are the things that needed to be given up.  They were unhealthy, abnormal coping skills and I have developed replacement (healthier) coping skills.  That's the way this is supposed to work.  If we didn't give up anything, we wouldn't keep the weight off, that's just the facts.  I am so incredibly happy that I have been given this tool that enabled me to give up those awful things that were slowly killing me.  In time, you will come to appreciate your sleeve and it's smallness for what it does for you.  Right now, it feels like the enemy but it's really a gift. 

That being said, if you are experiencing actual clinical depression please see your healthcare or mental health provider.  It is OK to ask for help getting out of the hole. 

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So ALL the responses on this thread are awesome!  I can't think of much more to add.

I can tell you this, at the 2 week post op mark, I was really tired, run down, depressed and just felt like garbage.  I ended up going to a place to for a hydration IV packed with vitamins and and minerals and felt about 200% better in just one hour.  It was worth every penny.

 

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Depression after any surgery isn't uncommon Kay.  Remove the comfort of all the yummy food that got us to the point of needing WLS can make it worse.This is a good read but please, talk with your surgeon or primary care about how you feel :  Depression after Bariatric Surgery: Triggers, Identification, Treatment, and Prevention

by Cynthia L. Alexander, PsyD

INTRODUCTION
A recent study in the Archives of Surgery has caught the attention of the bariatric community. It found the suicide rate after bariatric surgery to be at least five times that of the general population.1 This study may be thought of as important preliminary information, but it does not yet adequately explain the relationship between suicide and bariatric surgery. Nevertheless, this new information does highlight a need for bariatric professionals to educate their patients as to the possibility of depression postoperatively.

Psychological Triggers for Depression
“Why would I be depressed when I’m losing weight?”
This is a common response from patients when I discuss the possibility of depression after surgery. Most people approach the surgery with a positive attitude. Thoughts about future weight reduction, health benefits, and improved quality of life are dominant while awaiting surgery. After surgery however, reality does not always live up to the preoperative fantasy, and some patients do experience depression.2 In general, bariatric patients report a higher rate of depression than the non-bariatric population.3 One study found that of preoperative patients with no depression, over one-third of the sample developed depression postoperatively.4

“If I’m losing weight I won’t miss the food.”
This is a commonly held but unrealistic hope. Food not only nourishes our bodies, but it also serves other purposes. Food is present in almost every one of our societal ceremonies. From weddings to funerals, we eat to celebrate and to mourn. Socialization revolves around food as well. Going out to dinner is a popular activity with friends. Almost every major holiday is enhanced with a traditional menu. Postoperative patients often find themselves feeling as though they are on the outside of things. They realize that life goes on as usual, but they cannot participate in a ritual in the same way. This initial realization and subsequent mild depression may be conceptualized as the normal postoperative blues. It is not uncommon to hear, “What was I thinking when I decided to do this?” Many patients tell me they are “mourning the loss of food as a friend.” In my practice, I have observed many patients go through this, but most feel better within 2 to 3 months.

“When I can’t eat after surgery, I’ll lose weight, and then I just won’t go back to my old habits.”
This too is an unrealistic hope for many. It is normal for people to use food to deal with emotions. Some people use it to compensate for a bad day, others to celebrate, and still others to calm anxiety or depression. The tendency to eat for these reasons does not appear to change, although there is a period of a year or two when these cravings and urges may diminish. They do, however, almost always return. Eating disturbances before surgery tend to predict eating disturbances postoperatively following a short dormant period.5 In my groups I see a subset of people dealing with the reality that the surgery does not do all the work, and these postoperative patients are struggling once again to control emotional eating. This realization can lead to feelings of depression. Weight regain may occur during this time, further exacerbating the depression.

“I thought everything would get better after weight loss, but it didn’t.”
Some of our patients come from families that have set them apart for their weight. These are the “identified patients” of the family. There may be the dream that by losing weight, they will finally be accepted, and in some cases this does occur. In others, however, the families do not accept the patient, and may even resort to sabotage. If weight loss was the last hope, depression may follow.

“Everything will be okay if I can just lose the weight.”
In general, research does show that depression related to weight tends to decrease.6,7 Depression related to situational stressors, losses, and/or a biological depression will likely not decrease in the longterm. Presurgery depression has been linked with postsurgery psychological distress.8 There is a strong tendency for patients to attribute their depression to weight. It appears to be ego-syntonic to believe that when the weight is decreased, so too will the depression. For a subset of depressed patients, the weight is actually a symptom of depression rather than the other way around. When the timeline is traced backward, it becomes clear that weight increased directly following the onset of a chronic stressor. For these people, weight loss may be disappointing in that they may still be depressed at goal weight. Bariatric surgery is not a cure for depression.

“I gained weight after I got married. We love to go out to dinner together.”
I often hear this from married patients. Some habits take years to become ingrained. When the patient may want to avoid restaurants for some time, the spouse may begin to resent it. On the other hand, the spouse may be supportive, but the patient begins to feel that a part of the relationship is missing. Either way, an adjustment period for food as a social outlet or for recreation with a spouse is inevitable.
Removing the emphasis on food, especially after many years, can be difficult. During this adjustment period, patients may become depressed as they struggle to find the proper place for food and healthy alternatives to going out to dinner.

“He’s not the same person since the surgery.”
Irritability after surgery is common, and I hear from spouses that the first few months may be accompanied by certain temporary personality changes. The tendency to snap at the people closest to us during times of stress may play out with the bariatric patient as they navigate the initial stressful postoperative months. Difficulties in relationships have been reported, including divorces, contributing to feelings of depression. Again, there may be the fantasy of excitement over weight loss overriding all else, but the reality is often very different.

“The hardest part is doing all the tests to get ready for surgery. After surgery should be much easier.”
Some people underestimate the amount of stress they will go through during the first few postoperative months. If a person is already under stress, the addition of surgery may be overwhelming. Depression is not uncommon under these circumstances. If a person meets criteria for clinical depression preoperatively, the added stress of the surgery may exacerbate the depression. Since pills are very difficult to take postoperatively, some patients on antidepressants may be off their medication for a period of time after surgery, and this too may increase symptoms.

“I sure found out who my real friends were after I had surgery.”
Friends may be supportive, or may avoid the patient, or may even sabotage. Often it is difficult to find a way to relate to a friend if the favorite pastime was eating out in restaurants together. It may be an eye-opening experience watching friends and family react to the weight loss. Relationships with friends, family, and even spouses have been strained or even ended in the aftermath of bariatric surgery.

“I had complications, and I was in and out of the hospital for weeks.”
Few patients think that they will be one of the unlucky few that experience complications. For these patients, it is a daily struggle not to fall into a depressed state. Patients imagine coming home from surgery and beginning their new life, not being readmitted to the hospital.

Recommendations
Mild depression after surgery is not uncommon, especially if there are complications and hospital readmissions. Severe depression is much less common. Suicidal ideation is a serious red-flag that should be immediately addressed. All patients should receive education before surgery as to the possibility of depression, and the higher rates of suicide in this population. They should also be given education on the symptoms of depression, and concrete steps to follow to get help if they notice they are becoming depressed.

Most bariatric programs have many patients, and it is unrealistic to monitor the ongoing mental health of every patient. At Cleveland Clinic, we give patients education about the possibility of depression after bariatric surgery, and they are strongly encouraged to call if there is a problem or question.

How to Identify Depression
A person need not have all of these symptoms to be considered depressed, but having at least five of the following symptoms within a two-week period, including either sadness (1) or anhedonia (2), is indicative of clinical depression:9
1. Depressed mood most of the day, nearly every day
2. Anhedonia—markedly diminished interest or pleasure in almost all activities most of the day, nearly every day
3. Insomnia or hypersonmia nearly every day (take sleep apnea into consideration)
4. Psychomotor agitation or retardation
5. Fatigue or loss of energy (more than would be expected after surgery)
6. Feelings of worthlessness or excessive guilt
7. Diminished ability to concentrate, or indecisiveness
8. Recurrent thoughts of death or suicide
9. Significant changes in appetite (take surgery into consideration)
10. Irritability or increased somatic complaints without physical cause.

Treating Depression
1. Individual therapy. The many changes a person experiences after surgery and stressful adaptations may lead to depression. Therapy is the best way for a person to sort through these changes and alleviate depression. There are many psychologists, but identifying one with bariatric background may be a challenge. A referral from a center of excellence is a good place to start. Another alternative is calling the 800 number on the back of the insurance card. This may be helpful, as a professional with bariatric experience can be requested. Weekly therapy for 6 to 12 weeks should be sufficient in most cases.
2. Add an antidepressant. Therapy and an antidepressant together is the best and fastest means of alleviating depression.10 Antidepressants generally take 2 to 3 weeks to produce results.
3. Support groups. Every center of excellence provides support groups for patients. Patients should be encouraged to attend as many as possible.
4. Emergency assistance. If a patient is seriously considering suicide, he or she should call 911 immediately, or go directly to an emergency department. Depression skews the thinking so that suicide appears on the surface to be a solution. Thoughts cannot be trusted when in a depressed state. Patients should be educated to protect themselves by giving the professionals a chance to help.

Tips for Prevention
The following are tips for prevention of depression after surgery:
1. Develop healthy ways to deal with stress. Since the most stressful time is the few months directly following surgery, it is important to develop these strategies prior to surgery. Try a new hobby, develop friendships with other bariatric patients, use positive affirmations, take a yoga class, or listen to music. It is a good idea to purchase a book or CD on stress management.
2. Make the switch from food as the main event to an activity. Making this transition before the surgery may decrease stress postoperatively. Learn to view food as the fuel for your activities. It may be challenging to see friends for putt-putt golf or to attend a play rather than going out to dinner, but the emphasis should now be on the activity. This change is among the most difficult for postoperative patients.
3. Employ and practice healthy and positive self-talk. Keep the health benefits in mind.
4. Exercise often. New research shows that exercise works about as well as an antidepressant if done on a regular basis.11
5. Find a therapist. Even if not depressed, it is always a good idea to have a therapist in place for the first few months postoperatively. This professional will get to know the patient, be able to identify a trend toward depression early, and be the liaison with the physician if the patient wishes to try an antidepressant. If a patient is depressed preoperatively, it is even more important to have a therapist to assist with the first few months.
6. Prepare the family for changes, and ask them to become involved in the decision-making process. Changes will affect everyone in the household. Relationships within the home may be strained during the initial postoperative period. Keep in mind how trying it sometimes is to be a supportive family member, and ask them on a regular basis how they are doing.
7. Difficulty taking medication. If a patient is already on an antidepressant prior to surgery, make him or her aware that taking pills postoperatively will be difficult for some time. The patient should check with the pharmacist about whether the medication may be crushed and mixed with applesauce or yogurt, and should try to get back on the medication as soon as possible after surgery.
8. Prevention based on a history. If there is a history of depression, suicide attempts, suicidal ideation, or inpatient psychiatric hospitalization, the patient should be prepared by having both a psychiatrist and a psychologist. Weekly therapy along with medication management may keep depression at bay, or treat it early to prevent serious problems.
9. Timing of surgery. If already severely depressed, surgery should be postponed until depression decreases whenever possible. Some patients with untreated major depression should receive treatment before surgery.12 For others, waiting may not be an option due to significant health risks.

Conclusion
Most patients will not become depressed after surgery, but the possibility is present. Therefore it is strongly recommended that each patient receive education about postoperative depression, including the recent study showing the elevated rate of suicide.1 It is important that patients do not make the illogical assumption that suicide is a side effect of bariatric surgery. At this point, we do know that there is a potential vulnerability that should be addressed, but we do not yet know all of the facts concerning this finding. Preoperative education should be provided for all patients, along with steps to take if they do become depressed. With adequate education and support, hopefully postoperative depression may be reduced.

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Hi Kay,

here are my thoughts:

Of course you are depressed! you are grieving the loss of your love...food! Your way of eating, your daily habits...everything is different. Change isn’t always easy.

 

the nutritionist at my doctor office said:

- carbonated drinks is the only thing that will stretch your pouch

- no straws or gum, ever. Will make you take in too much air

- caffeine is ok after 6 months


You’ll know more about what is right for you as you go along. Practice mindful eating and keep your eye on the prize, a fantastic new you!
 

xoxo

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Thank you for all the replies. I have read all of them. And I'm feeling a lot more optimistic because a few of you mentioned you drink seltzer, which give me hope that I will once again be able to enjoy a cold bottle of my beloved Perrier once again. My PCP also said that I will be able to drink seltzer again. As silly as it sounds, that was really weighing heavy on my mind. More than any food.

I also really appreciate all of the concern you guys had regarding my mental state. And to those of you who were concerned. I did go see my surgeon, as well as a therapist. And I am taking anti-depressants. And to those of you who claimed they worked wonders, you were right. They have been working seemingly overnight. And I feel so much better. My surgeon also eased my mind, and explained to me from a medical sense as to why I did this. And that my life would've been much worse in the long run. He reminded me that I had high cholesterol (now under control), was pre-diabetic (A1C Levels now normal), and over 200lbs overweight (now >100lbs), low self esteem, etc), and that his team would never encourage me to do a surgery if they didn't feel it was 100% necessary.

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11 hours ago, Reptar Kay said:

And I'm feeling a lot more optimistic because a few of you mentioned you drink seltzer, which give me hope that I will once again be able to enjoy a cold bottle of my beloved Perrier once again. My PCP also said that I will be able to drink seltzer again. As silly as it sounds, that was really weighing heavy on my mind. More than any food.

Plain water makes me want to gag so I'm completely with you on this. ;) 

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