Mariam

Food Ideas

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Hi All,

I am 1-month post-op, and I would like recommendations for what kind of new foods I can try?

Thanks in advance,

Mariam

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This eating and nutrition guide from one of the best hospitals in Boston should be helpful to you:

GBP-Diet-Manual12611.ashx?la=en&hash=29F

The food limitations in the first few months after surgery can be rough, but it gets a lot better. 

We are here to support you. 

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On 6/23/2019 at 2:01 PM, Mariam said:

Hi All,

I am 1-month post-op, and I would like recommendations for what kind of new foods I can try?

Thanks in advance,

Mariam

Mariam what are you eating now? At a month I was still struggling with pureed and very soft foods. 

One suggestion: many of us like eggs, but find hard-boiled eggs difficult at your stage. I found that soft-boiled eggs were easy to eat and good sources of protein without any significant carbohydrate. I had to re-learn how to cook them as I had fallen out of the habit of making them. To my surprise they also reminded me of my early childhood, when my mother used to make these for the children, which was kind of nice. Two reliable ways to cook soft-boiled eggs:

1. Use a sous-vide machine that heats water to a specific temperature and keeps it at that temperature for hours if needed. You can cook eggs using sous-vide and pick your precise temperature that delivers exactly the way you like your egg. The Japanese used to cook eggs in hot springs and they call this onsen tamago. You can look online and see how eggs cook differently at very slightly different temperatures. The difference between an egg cooked at 68 C egg and a 70 C egg is startling. The advantage of this method is how precisely you can cook an egg to your taste. The disadvantage is that it can take 30 to 60 minutes. 

2. If you have an Instant Pot, steam pressure-cook 2 eggs on the higher of the two pressure settings for exactly 4 minutes and let them cool in the device for 3 to 5 minutes afterwards, then release the pressure and put them into cold water. I put about 200 mls of water into the pot and put 2 eggs into the pot on a small metal strainer that elevates them out of the water. I get softly cooked egg whites, and silky smooth not quite set yolks, with this that I love to eat. I use 4 minutes if the eggs are coming out of the refrigerator and are cold, and 3 minutes if they are room temperature.

Both of these methods, by the way, should pasteurize the eggs if you are worried about getting a Salmonella infection from a not fully cooked egg. 

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