JudyAnn

Weight Gain After Five Years GBP

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Hi. The people of this forum have helped me from pre-surgery fears, to post surgery uncertainty and vulnerability, to weight loss goal and celebration. I am so grateful to all of you.

I  now face such a troubling dilemma. I am five years post-gastric bypass. I have moved to two different states since that time and no longer have contact with my GBP surgeon's office.

In the last two years, I have gained 30+ pounds. To me, it feels as though the GBP was a temporary tool and I am no longer receiving any benefit from undergoing such a radical surgery.  I am so discouraged. I fear all the progress I've made will be reversed. I am reaching out before I am too far gone.

It feels as though I'm on a downward spiral. I am desperate to not return to where I was before surgery. I still watch my portions, drink 15 minutes after my meals, and try to eat all the right foods. I do not follow the exact plan I did post-surgery though (protein shakes, etc...)  Also, I have been having serious sugar cravings - which is unusual for me. 

Is GBP surgery simply temporary? Does your body return back to completely functioning the way it was before after a period of time? It seemed like a miracle for the first few years!

Any advice or encouragement would be SOOOO appreciated. Practical tips would be helpful too. I know we are here to support one another and I thank you for reading my post.

Judy

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From all the research I've done regarding regain, 5 years is the real danger time for regain after bypass...it's only 2-3 years for VSG. My surgeon told me that they expect and accept 10% regain at some stage after bypass...he used the word "inevitable".  He never did say whether it was a percentage of weight lost, or total body weight though. The human body is an amazing biological creature. It really doesn't like change, and does everything it can to adapt to changes that are made to it. Hunger does return, different parts of the system adapt to produce hormones that have been changed by surgery, and the bowel becomes more efficient at absorbing the food we eat. We first see this happening when the "honeymoon" is over. That's why surgeons tell us not to waste our honeymoon period. I guess that really does tell us that certain aspects of our surgery are indeed temporary. However, our pouches can remain small if we look after them correctly, so we shouldn't revert back to pre-op weight if we have changed our relationship to food. 

I hope you get some answers. It's probably worth you seeking out a new bariatric practice and checking in with them for advice. It's definitely worth doing so for at least yearly monitoring of everything that still needs monitoring. 

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I'm only 14 months postop, so I don't have alot of practical advice for 5 years out. But you totally have my encouragement and support!!! I hope you can your head back on track, and it sounds like you're on your way if you're seeking out help. That's a huge first step!

I feel very underqualified to give any advice, but maybe just an internal checkup with the following might help? 

 -  Are you tracking your food? I find My Fitness Pal very helpful, and when I track my food, I not only feel more in control, but I can see where my extra calories or carbs etc might be coming in. I also seem to eat less if I know I have to track it. 

 - Are you exercising? I eat WAY better if I'm exercising for some reason. It really boosts my spirits and helps me feel like I'm improving my life. 

 - Are you drinking your water? It may help fill you up and get rid of excess water weight. 

- On line data? Dr. Matthew Weiner has alot of good videos on line about post WLS issues, and maybe seeing them, or seeing them again may help? 

- Local WLS doctor? I would definitely find one and ask to meet with their nutritionist and/or attend support groups. I know my doc has alot of people that he supports who had the surgery a long time ago, and most of those were not his original patients. People move around all the time. 

Again,  I'm not far enough along to really have good experience, so I'm sorry if my suggestions seem trite or elementary. But they come from me with all my support, at least! :wub:

Hang in there! You can do this! Please keep us posted how you are doing! Maybe make yourself check in each week to tell us how it's going! Sending hugs!! 

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The scientific research that I gave seen, and posted here in the past, indicates that the calorie malabsorption with gastric bypass does not go away. So you still have a very powerful weight loss tool built into your body. 

30+ pounds of weight loss regain to lose is not ideal, but you absolutely can do it.  I suggest that you start with the five day pouch test and then return to the strict post op diet that you followed after your surgery. Be patient and take complying with your diet seriously.

Here is information on the five day pouch test:

http://www.5daypouchtest.com/plan/theplan.html

Here is a good description of a post op diet:

https://www.tuftsmedicalcenter.org/-/media/Brochures/TuftsMC/Patient-Care-Services/Departments-and-Services/Weight-and-Wellness-Center/GBP-Diet-Manual12611.ashx?la=en&hash=29F5FC8CE082A84BBD66A46335C50C23B8042A29

You can do it if you accept that failure is not an option. We are here to support you. 

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On 5/9/2019 at 1:48 PM, Res Ipsa said:

You can do it if you accept that failure is not an option. We are here to support you

WOAH! I LOVE THIS! MY MANTRA FOR THE DAY, WEEK, MONTH!!! 

Thanks, @Res Ipsa:)

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On 5/5/2019 at 12:46 PM, JudyAnn said:

Hi. The people of this forum have helped me from pre-surgery fears, to post surgery uncertainty and vulnerability, to weight loss goal and celebration. I am so grateful to all of you.

I  now face such a troubling dilemma. I am five years post-gastric bypass. I have moved to two different states since that time and no longer have contact with my GBP surgeon's office.

In the last two years, I have gained 30+ pounds. To me, it feels as though the GBP was a temporary tool and I am no longer receiving any benefit from undergoing such a radical surgery.  I am so discouraged. I fear all the progress I've made will be reversed. I am reaching out before I am too far gone.

It feels as though I'm on a downward spiral. I am desperate to not return to where I was before surgery. I still watch my portions, drink 15 minutes after my meals, and try to eat all the right foods. I do not follow the exact plan I did post-surgery though (protein shakes, etc...)  Also, I have been having serious sugar cravings - which is unusual for me. 

Is GBP surgery simply temporary? Does your body return back to completely functioning the way it was before after a period of time? It seemed like a miracle for the first few years!

Any advice or encouragement would be SOOOO appreciated. Practical tips would be helpful too. I know we are here to support one another and I thank you for reading my post.

Judy

How are you doing now Judy ?

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The tool still works; it's our habits that needs breaking and recreating new ways of eating and managing stress. I'm over 15 years now; lowest weight is about 120-125# when I'm sick, 155# when I was in graduate school; generally hover 130-135#. I stick to a modified ketogenic lifestyle and keep portions small. Very easy to snack your way back up as our bodies have a wonderful way of "bypassing the bypass" as I call it. Our bodies will adjust to eating larger portions and tolerate foods again over time. 

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15 minutes ago, lealphachienne said:

The tool still works; it's our habits that needs breaking and recreating new ways of eating and managing stress. I'm over 15 years now; lowest weight is about 120-125# when I'm sick, 155# when I was in graduate school; generally hover 130-135#. I stick to a modified ketogenic lifestyle and keep portions small. Very easy to snack your way back up as our bodies have a wonderful way of "bypassing the bypass" as I call it. Our bodies will adjust to eating larger portions and tolerate foods again over time. 

If I could, I would like this post a million times over.

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