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lightenupwoman

NSAID IM or patch?

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Does anyone know if there is an NSAID that can be taken I'M? I'm already giving myself a shot for something else and it's no big deal. I am having chronic ankle pain and the Dr said I should really take an anti inflammatory. 

I could take one but then need to take omeprazole but that causes anemia and I've already been down that road and just can't do that again. 

Just curious. Or is there a topical? 

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Can't help on NSAID injections but I know that Flector® is an NSAID patch but how effective it is compared to oral form, I don't know.  But they do report side effects:

nausea.
vomiting.
diarrhea.
constipation.
upset stomach.
heartburn.
gas, or.
dizziness.

 

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why so many GI effects from a patch? Thanks for the info!

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16 minutes ago, lightenupwoman said:

why so many GI effects from a patch? .....

This is a good read on Flector:  https://www.rxlist.com/flector-patch-side-effects-drug-center.htm

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6 hours ago, lightenupwoman said:

Does anyone know if there is an NSAID that can be taken I'M? I'm already giving myself a shot for something else and it's no big deal. I am having chronic ankle pain and the Dr said I should really take an anti inflammatory. 

I could take one but then need to take omeprazole but that causes anemia and I've already been down that road and just can't do that again. 

Just curious. Or is there a topical? 

Depending on where you live, CBD oil might be a good option. 

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Toradol (generic name Ketoralac) is an injectable NSAID.  It is usually used with caution in people with GI issues though so I don't know that you'd be any better off that with an oral one.  Topical Magnesium sometimes works for some people as an anti-inflammatory.  Likely not as potent as an NSAID but not as dangerous either. 

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@lightenupwoman  You might consider taking a different class of antacid that doesn't cause anemia like the omeprazole does.... might Zantac / ranitidine work for you if you wanted to take another NSAID by mouth?

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In physical therapy they wanted to do that NSAID patch but one therapist said she's had just as good or better results from doing the patch with vinegar. I'm pre op so I'm on the fence if I want to do it with gel or do it with vinegar. I have achilles tendinitis that is constantly inflamed.  

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19 hours ago, MeadowBlue said:

In physical therapy they wanted to do that NSAID patch but one therapist said she's had just as good or better results from doing the patch with vinegar. I'm pre op so I'm on the fence if I want to do it with gel or do it with vinegar. I have achilles tendinitis that is constantly inflamed.  

I've never had to deal with tendonitis but I know that is very painful. 

Personally, I always try the homeopathic route before resorting to conventional medicine and you have nothing to lose at this stage by trying apple cider vinegar at home.  Use Bragg Organic Apple Cider Vinegar.   

Soak a clean cloth in equal parts vinegar and warm water - apply to ankle for 10-15 minutes - repeat 2-3 times).  And drinking apple cider vinegar 2-3 times a day can help too (diluted with warm water with a touch of honey if you wish).

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NSAIDs are unfortunately a systemic thing. They cause stomach problems not because of the pill being actually present in your stomach, but because their method of functioning interrupts the prostaglandin pathway. Unfortunately, this means that no matter what form - pill, patch, topical - most NSAIDs will still cause GI distress and open up the possibilities of ulcers. I treated a patient just this week who had two ulcers from topical Voltaren, which is an NSAID. 

Have you discussed possible steroidal injections? They are more localized and less systemic than NSAIDs typically, so it could be injected around the tendon and be less likely to cause stomach issues (although some people will have issues regardless). 

 

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On 10/30/2018 at 11:17 AM, delilas said:

NSAIDs are unfortunately a systemic thing. They cause stomach problems not because of the pill being actually present in your stomach, but because their method of functioning interrupts the prostaglandin pathway. Unfortunately, this means that no matter what form - pill, patch, topical - most NSAIDs will still cause GI distress and open up the possibilities of ulcers. I treated a patient just this week who had two ulcers from topical Voltaren, which is an NSAID. 

Have you discussed possible steroidal injections? They are more localized and less systemic than NSAIDs typically, so it could be injected around the tendon and be less likely to cause stomach issues (although some people will have issues regardless). 

 

Speaking from experience injections havent worked for me at all and I've had 3 different areas of joint paint where I've had injections. My doctor was mortified to learn that the podiatrist injected the bursa of my heel with steroids which a lot of doctors know can cause a rupture. I am leaning more towards homeopathic methods at this point. 

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