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What are foamies? My doctor never mention this? All I heard was the "dumping ". Also papaya enzyme?? Just reading so much on this forum and am trying to follow. 

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Foamies are a saliva build up that tends to come up when you eat too much (particularly meat) after bypass. Many bypassers don't vomit anymore, they just get the Foamies.

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Papaya enzyme helps in digestion.  I find it helpful if I didn’t chew well enough or if something didn’t agree with me.  I chew 2 or 3.  They are chewable and easily found in the vitamin section at Walmart.  (A side note-my hubby travels for work a lot.  One of the countries he’s been to serves a slice of papaya at the end of the meal to aid in digestion).

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Thanks for this info. I'll get to Walmart this weekend and be sure I have it on hand. I'm twelve days out and still having pain at inscions and can't bend over but food and liquid have not been an issue. 

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Yep!  I've had the foamies once since my RNY over 10 years ago and it was a bit of strawberry that I didn't chew enough that was the culprit and what can't go down will just come back up.  Not a painful experience - I just felt like a rabid dog for a while!  LOL!

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Note that not all people with a gastric  bypass have "foamies".  For example I do not have them, nor do I use papaya enzymes.  On the other hand, I dump if I eat a bowl of ice cream, and when I eat steak or other firm red meat, it is quite likely that I will throw the food back up about 10 minutes later.

Everyone's gastric bypass journey is a bit different.

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37 minutes ago, Res Ipsa said:

Note that not all people with a gastric  bypass have "foamies".  For example I do not have them, nor do I use papaya enzymes.  On the other hand, I dump if I eat a bowl of ice cream, and when I eat steak or other firm red meat, it is quite likely that I will throw the food back up about 10 minutes later.

Everyone's gastric bypass journey is a bit different.

It certainly is!

In the 10 1/2 years since my RNY, I have never thrown up and have had the foamies just once so I count my blessings. 

I have an internet acquaintance who had her RNY 3 years ago and it seems that she's regurgitating (in some shape or form) at least a couple of times a week.  I don't know whether she's eating stuff that has no right to be in her mouth or whether she's eating too fast, too much and/or not chewing enough.

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It may be different for sleevers. My Dr told me that If I start vomiting foam, it is from sinus drainage. When our stomachs are large there is plenty of room for post nasal drip. Not so much once they make it smaller. I was instructed to take Mucinex D if I get the "foamies".

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OK, so I have assumed the foamies was a kind of stomach regurgitation after eating something that was having to come back up. I'm a sleever so not really in the know - - pretty funny that I have been posting  for a year but really did not understand what it meant!

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I sometimes get the foamies when I eat something that doesn't agree with me, even if I chew very carefully and don't eat too much. I got it worse in the beginning, but now just occasionally. It's basically a warning that I should go vomit up whatever is bothering me. Vomiting post-op is not really very gross or painful ( um, well, usually @NerdyToothpick), and doesn't taste all gross like before. It's sort of more like regurgitating chewed up food. Some things just trigger that for me (overcooked fish, carrot sticks, Ryvita crackers). 

Papaya enzymes help with the bad feeling if it's protein you've got stuck. 

Dumping is, as explained above, usually about eating something that your body has a hard time with (sugar usually, also oily stuff like fried foods). It hits your small intestine too quickly and your body can't process it, so you have some sugar shock and/or "intestinal distress," accompanied by the need to sleep it off. 

Ah, so many fun things to learn. 

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That sounds like fun that I would rather just miss out on altogether lol

I get to start eating soft solids this week and I am so afraid of throwing up. I have yet to feel the heavy feeling in my chest that will tell me when I am full. It does make me feel better to know that it is more of a regurgitation than actual heaving and vomiting. Yikes!

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14 hours ago, Readytobeme said:

That sounds like fun that I would rather just miss out on altogether lol

I get to start eating soft solids this week and I am so afraid of throwing up. I have yet to feel the heavy feeling in my chest that will tell me when I am full. It does make me feel better to know that it is more of a regurgitation than actual heaving and vomiting. Yikes!

Yes, I've learned that regurgitating is much better than trying to hang onto it and being in pain for many hours. Just don't hurry when you're eating - tiny bites, put down your spoon/fork in between and stop and evaluate after every bite for a while. 

I use tiny dessert spoons to eat (when I'm not in public!) so my bites are by default pretty small. It helps. Tiny plates and bowls, too. It's like I'm living in a dollhouse <_<

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11 hours ago, Jen581791 said:

Yes, I've learned that regurgitating is much better than trying to hang onto it and being in pain for many hours. Just don't hurry when you're eating - tiny bites, put down your spoon/fork in between and stop and evaluate after every bite for a while. 

I use tiny dessert spoons to eat (when I'm not in public!) so my bites are by default pretty small. It helps. Tiny plates and bowls, too. It's like I'm living in a dollhouse <_<

I have the 4 oz ramekins and appetizer spoons and forks. I am using the spoons for my liquid so that I am used to slowing down. I fear this will be a problem for me at first.

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7 hours ago, Readytobeme said:

I have the 4 oz ramekins and appetizer spoons and forks. I am using the spoons for my liquid so that I am used to slowing down. I fear this will be a problem for me at first.

It sounds like you’re set! The little tiny china and cutlery are so helpful in getting your brain to adjust to small portions.

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16 minutes ago, Jen581791 said:

It sounds like you’re set! The little tiny china and cutlery are so helpful in getting your brain to adjust to small portions.

I agree, although eventually (in a few months) you should be able to shift back to using normal cutlery.  On the other hand, after my surgery I shifted to eating all of my meals on small plates, and I still am doing this 4.5 years later.  When I was served Thanksgiving dinner a few months ago on a normal dinner plate I felt like I was eating off of a platter. :D

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