Dinah

Considering Plication: Am based in Europe, I have questions about everything!:)

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1 hour ago, Kio said:

We should totally have a sticky post titled "#@$! My Nutritionist Says" here

ლ(ಠ益ಠლ)  Totally. 

I remember someone once listed their NUT's requirements here and the total in macro grams (no more than x fats, no more than x carbs, no more than x protein) didn't even add up to 600 calories per day!!!! No wonder people feel frustrated with trying to get the eating right!!!  ¯\_(ツ)_/¯  My NUT was like, "Just eat normally, healthily, but less." I'm like, "Normally for who?" So I do my own thing.

I think it's important to know yourself. I don't trigger my own cravings by eating fats. I do that by eating carbs, particularly processed ones. So I don't eat them. I like fat. It makes me feel satisfied. So I eat it. The idea of never eating blue cheese again would make me cry. I love it. I eat cheese every day. But no processed carbs. 

As for gastric plication, I found this study, which was paid for by the Ministry of Education of the Czech Republic and carried out in Ostrava, interestingly enough... https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4653266/  I lived in Prague for a while, jealous of you :) 

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4 minutes ago, Dinah said:

Jen you are amazing, thanks!!!

Není zač :) 

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34 minutes ago, Dinah said:

This sounds great even though I do not know what confit means:). There is something about chicken skin that is wonderfu.

Dinah, confit is an old process - you salt/herb poultry and remove excess water, then cook submerged in oil - olive oil, duck fat, whatever - at a low temperature for hours. The meat does NOT become oily or greasy. When done, you can store the cooked meat in the oil for weeks or months - it was used to preserve fresh poultry in the past. When you want to eat it, it is common to crisp up the skin in a pan or under a broiler. There are some nice pictures in the websites listed below, which are recipes. The bottom one is the most bare-bones description of how to make, the others provide more context. 

I buy whole frozen ducks as Costco or else quantity packs of chicken legs to confit. 

Last night for dinner I  had 100 grams of chicken thigh confit mixed into 150 grams of red kidney beans, 90 g of green peas, and about 45 grams of sharp cheddar cheese all baked together (each component was pre-cooked or thawed, excepting the cheese, before baking together). No I am NOT eating just 3 ozs of food at dinner and yes my weight is very stable!

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/09/magazine/table-for-two-no-waiting.html

https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/chicken-leg-confit-with-potatoes-and-escarole

https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1018578-chicken-confit-with-roasted-potatoes-and-parsley-salad

https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/11494-chicken-confit

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I am a terrible cook! I will have to study this.Sometimes things are made more difficult by being in a foreign country. Thank you so much,it sounds yummy!

I have 6 year old twins -- yes I had kids at 47(!) -- so am figuring out if I can eventually cook for all of us and just eat slightly differently than them without cooking twice. I work nonstop (part of the eating  problem, obv) and my husband only cooks Czech recipes from 1975! Even now when I make something relatively healthy he makes barfing faces, which is really helpful. As you can see I have more than an food issue to solve! Thank you for your inspiring recipes and out look! What a great bunch you all are! 

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One nice thing about confit is that it is dead easy. Buy the legs, dust with salt and herbs if you have the time, put into a dish and cover with oil. Cook for hours with no attention. At the end you have cooked delicious food.

And if you left too much olive oil or duck fat on the legs when you warm up, your 1975-style cooking husband will be happy. 

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1 hour ago, Dinah said:

my husband only cooks Czech recipes from 1975! Even now when I make something relatively healthy he makes barfing faces,

Czechs are not famous for loving vegetables! :lol: Lots of Czech standards can be done in a WLS friendly fashion, though. Gulaš: perfect, but no knedliky. Svičkova? Again, great but no knedliky. Vepro-knedlo-zelo? Just not the knedlo part. Rizek could be OK without the breadcrumb. Notice a pattern? No bread! :)  Zeli you probably have to be careful of because it's often sweetened - but perfect if it's not.

If you look around on some keto recipe websites, you'll probably find things your husband will like. And then you can always serve him the knedliky... 

 

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3 hours ago, Jen581791 said:

Czechs are not famous for loving vegetables! :lol: Lots of Czech standards can be done in a WLS friendly fashion, though. Gulaš: perfect, but no knedliky. Svičkova? Again, great but no knedliky. Vepro-knedlo-zelo? Just not the knedlo part. Rizek could be OK without the breadcrumb. Notice a pattern? No bread! :)  Zeli you probably have to be careful of because it's often sweetened - but perfect if it's not.

If you look around on some keto recipe websites, you'll probably find things your husband will like. And then you can always serve him the knedliky... 

 

For those not knowledgeable about Czech food, knedlo are boiled dumplings.  Clearly not weight loss surgery friendly. :D

 

TTF.jpg

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