AustinJ

My body has gone crazy!!!!

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I apologize in advance this is a long post.

For all of you who have been following my progress, you know I have been a very fast loser before and after surgery. For those who haven't been, on May 2, 2017 I started the bariatric program, I weighed 504lbs. 6 months 6 days later, on November 8th, I had lost 97lbs weighing 407lbs and had a LSG (Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy). During the 6 months leading up to surgery I used everything at my disposal to learn about the LSG surgery, nutrition, exercise and my body and how it works specifically. I feel I've applied what I've learned with great success. Today, Feb 15, 2018, 3 months 7 days out from surgery I have lost an additional 86lbs, I now weigh 321 lbs. Total weight loss so far of 183lbs over 9 months 13 days.

For the past 5 weeks I have been training for a 5k/3.1mile run. I will be running it with a friend this spring who walked one with me last fall. I started off by speeding up my walking from 3.2mph to 4mph for 75 min to build up endurance. Once I was used to that I added in running @ 6mph in an interval fashion to increase my cardio further. The first day of running I only ran 2 times @ 6mph for 3 min each, with plenty of walking @ 4mph in between to get my heart rate and breathing back down. The next day I added an extra interval of 4 mins @ 6mph. I continued to progress and build endurance this way until a week ago, when I made it to 6 x 5min 15sec intervals @ 6mph = 31.5min @ 6mph = 3.15 miles. During this process I have been increasing my fluid intake to compensate for excessive sweating, from 18 cups a day at the beginning to 30 cups a day now. I know that's an insane amount of fluid and exercise 3 months out but I haven't felt this amazing since I was playing football in college. Over the last week I have been combining the intervals into longer runs and less intervals 3 x 11mins, 2 x 16min, and yesterday 1 x 20min + 1 x 12min. 

2 weeks ago, I started going to our local wellness center 2-3 times a week to use the hot tub to relax sore muscles, like I used to do back in college. The hot tub or sauna will dilate your veins and arteries allowing lactic acid to dissipate from your muscles faster (lactic acid causes sore muscles after exercise). I follow that up with a cool shower to constrict the veins and arteries to increase blood flow. Increased blood flow allows nutrients and protein to get to your muscles faster to repair them after exercise.

A couple days after I stared going to the wellness center I started feeling strange. Moody, hot, cold, sweaty, all for no apparent reason. I thought I may have picked up a bug there. I had occasional mild light headedness like when you get the flu and it passes quickly and some tingling feeling in my hands. I contacted the bariatric team so I could get a consult with the dietician and nutritionist just in case it was hypoglycemia.

Day 3 of the hot tub treatment, Thursday February 8, also the first day of running over 3.1miles in one session, I did my 15-20min in the hot tub and when I went to get out I got really light headed and experienced diminished vision. I had to stand on the stairs for a min or two to get back to feeling normal. From past experience this is a sign over exertion, or so I thought.... I took my cool shower and felt good the rest of the night.

Then things got down right weird, Friday morning I woke up soaking wet with sweat, I lost 5 lbs of fluid while sleeping. I usually only drift 2lbs max overnight. I got out of bed and got really light headed and lost my vision for 30 seconds or so, my whole body was tingling and I felt like I was floating. I gave it minute and it passed. At that point, I decided I would not be running but just walking if I felt up to it when my normal exercise time came around. I ate breakfast, took my vitamins and drank a bunch of fluid. I felt great again so I walked 75mins @ 3.8mph on Friday with no subsequent issues.

Friday, February 9th A.M., I spoke with my dietician and granted her access to my MyFitnessPal logs of exercise and intake. She reviewed my logs and got back to me stating “I noticed how low your sodium intake is. Your symptoms could be from hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), but they also sound like they could be from orthostatic hypotension (low blood pressure). With the amount you are exercising, and subsequently sweating, you are losing a lot of sodium, but not really replacing it.” She also suggested getting a blood pressure cuff and a blood sugar meter so I can test and see what’s going on. She also wanted me to get my blood labs done 3 weeks early so we can see my electrolyte levels. She also gave me a few things to change in my diet that would help if my symptoms were from hypoglycemia or orthostatic hypotension. First, to increase my sodium intake from 1300mg to 2000-2250 per day. Second, drink electrolyte replacement like Power-aid Zero. Third, she also stated my carbs are very low, with the amount of exercise I’m doing. I contacted my PCP to set up an appointment for the labs and they wanted me to increase my calories from 800 to 1000 per day, due to my caloric burn from exercise of about 1,250 cal per day.

            Following the dieticians and my PCP guidance. I did everything, I bought a blood pressure cuff, glucose meter, increased my carbs, calories and sodium, and replaced some of my water intake with Power-aid Zero (2-3 a day depending on sodium needs). Friday, I felt like I was eating and drinking non-stop.

            I don’t exercise on Saturday and Sunday so my body has time to recover, plus it was a good opportunity to build up some sodium and electrolytes for the coming week. With the increased sodium intake over the weekend my saliva tasted salty all the time, like I was pouring table salt directly into my mouth.  I only had one instance of very mild light headedness at church Sunday night with all the up and down.

            Monday, I woke up and felt great, like I was myself again. I received the blood pressure cuff in the mail and learned how to use it properly, and started testing and logging as directed by the dietician. I ate and drank as directed and proceeded to do my workout. I did intervals of walking at 3.8mph and running at 3 x 11mins @ 6mph totaling 76 mins. I had no issues while exercising and actually felt less drained afterward than the week before. I took a shower and felt the light headedness coming on so I put on the blood pressure cuff and it read 98/47 pulse 121 when 10 mins before my blood pressure was 117/75 pulse 75. My normal BP is 125/78 resting heart rate 55bpm. Orthostatic hypotension confirmed. I have logged several instances over the last few days of the OSHT, the worst of which is after hot water contact. I even had one read out of 78/46 pulse 128.

            Yesterday, I went in for my lab work up and brought my BP cuff to check its accuracy and the nurse was impressed that it worked so well. I was also able to pick up a blood glucose meter yesterday as well and started tracking that. Turns out my blood sugar crashes a couple hours after eating, this is known as reactive hypoglycemia.

I also noticed that my blood sugar was higher after working out, which I though was weird, so I looked into it. It turns out that higher blood sugar after exercise is uncommon, but anaerobic exercise, such as long running, interval training and heavy weight lifting can increase glucose in the blood. Your body breaks down fat reserves into glucose when you exercise for energy, but when anaerobic exercise is sustained your muscles can’t consume glucose from the blood fast enough so they use glycogen stores in the muscle for energy instead. Leaving behind extra glucose in the blood. I am non-diabetic, but according to a diabetic study about anaerobic exercise, eating within 4 hours after exercise that increases your blood sugar can cause an insulin dump in return causing a hypoglycemic event.

            After reading several studies about both reactive hypoglycemia and orthostatic hypotension and how they pertain to LSG, they both seem to be pretty common issues after LSG. Some studies showing rates for reactive hypoglycemia up to 15% and orthostatic hypotension up to 34% after LSG. The studies stated a longer time frame out from surgery( 6 months to a year) for occurrence of the stated issues than myself, but not as drastic of weight loss. They also stated that the majority of the cases have resolved themselves as the body adjusted to the new weight.

           Has anyone had either of these issues or even both?

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Austin, your post reads like you're on a mission, no harm in that, just consider that you are on a lifelong change and there isn't any hurry to get anywhere. Weight loss is about what you put in your mouth and has little/none to do with cardio/vascular efforts. That's for a while other reason. I lost half my body weight from 360 to 180 with zero exercise. Thankfully, I enjoy walking and had my left knee replaced 3 years ago and can do it again, just pointing out that exercise is not the key for weight loss. I've been here for a long long time and many other folks who no longer check in back up what I am saying from their own personal experience. You're doing great, man, patience, grasshopper!

 

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15 minutes ago, tmcgee said:

Austin, your post reads like you're on a mission, no harm in that, just consider that you are on a lifelong change and there isn't any hurry to get anywhere. Weight loss is about what you put in your mouth and has little/none to do with cardio/vascular efforts. That's for a while other reason. I lost half my body weight from 360 to 180 with zero exercise. Thankfully, I enjoy walking and had my left knee replaced 3 years ago and can do it again, just pointing out that exercise is not the key for weight loss. I've been here for a long long time and many other folks who no longer check in back up what I am saying from their own personal experience. You're doing great, man, patience, grasshopper!

 

Thank you for taking the time to read my excessive ranting, and thank you for the reply.

Per the request of my wife and mother, I did no exercise today but did the BP and glucose monitoring for the Dr. I'm pleased to say I had no issues on either front. BP was steady at 125/76 pulse 60-75 and glucose between 85-95 all day. It appears at this point my wife was right that I was over doing things and causing it all myself. Tomorrow I think I will just go for a walk, the 5k can wait I've got time.

Thank you again

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Wow you really did some serious research and troubleshooting! 

You are truly inspirational in keeping your eyes on the prize. I envy your enjoyment of exercise. I've discovered that there's nothing in my life more mind-numbingly boring to me than exercise.  :-)

I hope you get some solid answers to your blackouts.

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Austin, sounds like you have done your research!  The one thing I know is that when I was a nurse, we never let our patients take hot showers for that reason.....it will basically "drain" and "weaken" someone and bring down their BP and make them lightheaded and then they were in danger of fainting in the shower so the staying away from the hot tub or sauna would be a good idea for you.  Taking things easier also a good idea.  

Oh and I must agree w/ your wife.....slow it down and take care of yourself....she and your son need you around a LOT longer :)

Plus, i have no idea if this would pertain to you but i was reading an article last night (from Jen's list of articles to read) that was about the Biggest Losers and how they worked out soooo much that they lowered their metabolism to such a slow rate and it never recovered (it was scientifically researched on these patients).  I have no idea if you are in danger of this or not, but it is worth looking into.   you may be doing TOO much exercise (something I have never been guilty of!) 

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/05/insider/research-scientist-finds-inspiration-in-reality-tv-show.html

 

Edited by CheeringCJ

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That must have been a pretty scary time Austin but kudos to you for your detective work.  I developed postprandial hypoglycemia after my RNY which I control with diet (exercise has no effect on it provided avoid all starchy carbs and eat at regular times although I admit, compared to you, I'm a couch potato).

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2 hours ago, CheeringCJ said:

Austin, sounds like you have done your research!  The one thing I know is that when I was a nurse, we never let our patients take hot showers for that reason.....it will basically "drain" and "weaken" someone and bring down their BP and make them lightheaded and then they were in danger of fainting in the shower so the staying away from the hot tub or sauna would be a good idea for you.  Taking things easier also a good idea.  

Oh and I must agree w/ your wife.....slow it down and take care of yourself....she and your son need you around a LOT longer :)

Plus, i have no idea if this would pertain to you but i was reading an article last night (from Jen's list of articles to read) that was about the Biggest Losers and how they worked out soooo much that they lowered their metabolism to such a slow rate and it never recovered (it was scientifically researched on these patients).  I have no idea if you are in danger of this or not, but it is worth looking into.   you may be doing TOO much exercise (something I have never been guilty of!) 

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/05/insider/research-scientist-finds-inspiration-in-reality-tv-show.html

 

CJ, it is the starvation dieting that lowers the metabolic rate, not the exercise!  Exercise boosts metabolic rate, dieting reduces it. But hard to know how these balance out in any given individual.

@AustinJ - you are in part in the land of No One Knows if you are exercising 1250 calories a day and eating 800-1000 calories. To lose 86 lbs in "3 months 7 days" or about 97 days with 3500 calories per lb => you are talking being negative 3100 calories a day. Astonishing. 

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10 hours ago, Michael_A said:

Wow you really did some serious research and troubleshooting! 

You are truly inspirational in keeping your eyes on the prize. I envy your enjoyment of exercise. I've discovered that there's nothing in my life more mind-numbingly boring to me than exercise.  :-)

I hope you get some solid answers to your blackouts.

I am a strong believer in "knowledge is power" so I read a lot about anything that has an affect on me.

Enjoyment of exercise is another thing, I try to distract myself while I exercise. I listen to music or watch TV while I'm on the treadmill. The enjoyable part of exercise for me isn't the exercise itself it is the boost in pride and self worth. Exercise is also good to burn off excess energy and anger.

The blackouts are from the Orthostatic Hypotension. There are meds to help control it, but I won't be taking them. My PCP and dietician feel that if I focus on electrolytes and sodium intake as well as reduce my exercise to not exceed my intake, that it will go away on its own.

Michael_A you are getting so close to your initial goal! Do you think that's where you will stop or do you feel you can/want to go further?

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3 hours ago, CheeringCJ said:

Austin, sounds like you have done your research!  The one thing I know is that when I was a nurse, we never let our patients take hot showers for that reason.....it will basically "drain" and "weaken" someone and bring down their BP and make them lightheaded and then they were in danger of fainting in the shower so the staying away from the hot tub or sauna would be a good idea for you.  Taking things easier also a good idea.  

Oh and I must agree w/ your wife.....slow it down and take care of yourself....she and your son need you around a LOT longer :)

Plus, i have no idea if this would pertain to you but i was reading an article last night (from Jen's list of articles to read) that was about the Biggest Losers and how they worked out soooo much that they lowered their metabolism to such a slow rate and it never recovered (it was scientifically researched on these patients).  I have no idea if you are in danger of this or not, but it is worth looking into.   you may be doing TOO much exercise (something I have never been guilty of!) 

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/05/insider/research-scientist-finds-inspiration-in-reality-tv-show.html

 

Yes, I was told by my PCP no more hot showers and no more hot tub unless I am with someone who knows my situation and is strong enough to get me out.:D

The reason I decided to have this surgery in the first place was so I could be around a lot longer for my wife and son. That is ultimately the argument my wife used to convince me to pull back.

The dietician didn't seem to concerned with the excessive exercise, just that she want me to aim for balance between my intake and output. She put it basically "let your body lose the weight, don't force it".

I will have to check out that later article when I'm in a reading mood.

CJ your progress looks to be going great. I hope your hubby adjust well and is able to keep his diabetes under control.

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1 hour ago, cinwa said:

That must have been a pretty scary time Austin but kudos to you for your detective work.  I developed postprandial hypoglycemia after my RNY which I control with diet (exercise has no effect on it provided avoid all starchy carbs and eat at regular times although I admit, compared to you, I'm a couch potato).

It was definitely a wake up call, but I think I am in good hands with my PCP and dietician and on the right path now, only time will tell.

Both the dietician and my PCP referred to postprandial hypoglycemia but ultimately decided to refer to it as reactive hypoglycemia because they were not sure if it was due to just the food or a combination of food and exercise.

Has your postprandial hypoglycemia gotten better with time? My surgeon told me most people who suffer from it after LSG only deal with it while loosing and once they level off for awhile it tends to go away. It may be different for Gastric Bypass.

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1 hour ago, BurgundyBoy said:

@AustinJ - you are in part in the land of No One Knows if you are exercising 1250 calories a day and eating 800-1000 calories. To lose 86 lbs in "3 months 7 days" or about 97 days with 3500 calories per lb => you are talking being negative 3100 calories a day. Astonishing. 

That's basically what I was told by the dietician, that I'm running into unknown. Both my PCP and dietician want me to bring my exercise down to at least match my intake, maybe even a little less.

I hope all is still going well for you BB. I greatly appreciate your presence and knowledge in our amazing TT community.

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I had a follow up today, my blood work all looks good, but as my PCP put it I had 6 days prior to the blood work where I was forcing extra electrolytes and sodium into my body. He wants me to continue doing so.

Between my PCP, dietician and surgeon they want me to keep the anaerobic exercise to 2 days a week or less, but I can walk everyday. They also want me to keep my fluid and sodium intake up, but I can return to 800 cal and 30g of carbs per day. I am to keep my output less than or equal to my intake and let my body do the work to lose the weight.

I would like to thank everyone who took the time to read my extremely long post and get back to me. I feel blessed to be part of such an amazing community.

I will try to keep you updated if anything new develops.

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I had LBP around the time I got to goal. My dr told me to eat more salt. I do and I've been fine ever since.

@tmcgee is right, your changes are for life and there isn't any rush to get anywhere. Goals are great - I have them too and I want to caution you to not allow yourself to become obsessive about tracking and charting everything. Exercise addiction is real. I know two men who became addicted to it post-WLS. One in my offline support group and one here who no longer posts. It is very easy to replace the time we spent on food (eating, cooking, buying, ordering, shopping, dreaming about it, etc) with booze, shopping, exercise, etc.There are several posts from veterans who come back a couple of years after getting to goal and share they ended up with transfer addictions.

All that said, congrats on your weight loss and life changes! 

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2 minutes ago, Stephtay said:

I had LBP around the time I got to goal. My dr told me to eat more salt. I do and I've been fine ever since.

@tmcgee is right, your changes are for life and there isn't any rush to get anywhere. Goals are great - I have them too and I want to caution you to not allow yourself to become obsessive about tracking and charting everything. Exercise addiction is real. I know two men who became addicted to it post-WLS. One in my offline support group and one here who no longer posts. It is very easy to replace the time we spent on food (eating, cooking, buying, ordering, shopping, dreaming about it, etc) with booze, shopping, exercise, etc.There are several posts from veterans who come back a couple of years after getting to goal and share they ended up with transfer addictions.

All that said, congrats on your weight loss and life changes! 

Thanks for the compliments Stephtay. I have a very addictive personality and I knew this long before surgery. I though I would transfer my previous addictions into exercise, because how could that be bad.  Like smoking and eating (my previous addictions), I managed to push things to far again. My wife told me to find a hobby to fill my time.:) I think I may try a planted fish aquarium, but I will probably find a way to push that to far too.

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7 minutes ago, AustinJ said:

Thanks for the compliments Stephtay. I have a very addictive personality and I knew this long before surgery. I though I would transfer my previous addictions into exercise, because how could that be bad.  Like smoking and eating (my previous addictions), I managed to push things to far again. My wife told me to find a hobby to fill my time.:) I think I may try a planted fish aquarium, but I will probably find a way to push that to far too.

I am the same way. I used to smoke and I still identify as a food addict but I choose not to use food the way I used to. When I find something new I like or enjoy I have to work to keep it in balance. The upside of that is I have a variety of hobbies and interests that I never had when my focus was food. It is good you recognize you have the potential to go overboard. The guy in my offline support group looks great and all the compliments fed into his exercise addiction. He realized he had a problem when he was in the hospital for surgery on his arm due to an exercise injury and he got out of his hospital bed in the middle of the night and went to the stairwell to run the stairs for exercise. I think about how crazy that sounds and then I remember I would regularly eat 4,000 calories in a meal. Addiction is a nasty, insidious little troublemaker. 

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I kind of wish this was posted a few days ago. I watched a documentary on the benefits of exercise that used various research papers and concluded that beyond a certain level exercise no longer had any benefit to the body. I really wish I could remember the name now, but if I do come across it again I'll definitely post here. From memory the makers of the documentary and their researchers discovered that the body response to exercise is like it's response to diet, in that there is a point where the metabolic rate increases brought about by exercise actually stop in a starvation mode style like diet produces. I'm pretty sure they also concluded that the higher the level of exercise the body is regularly subjected to, the more exercise it will require before the metabolic effects will kick in. 

It would seem our bodies are determined to stay where they want to be regardless of what we might want for them.

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Wow, @AustinJ, glad you’re doing some troubleshooting and are willing to take the measures your doctors have recommended. Take it easy a bit, eh? ;)

I totally understand your desire to just hurry up and get there. I felt that way, too (although I’m apparently not as driven as you). I’m currently trying really hard to take it easy until my hip gets better. I injured the opposite knee in December but didn’t stay off of it enough and have pain in the opposite hip due to compensation while limping around on it. Not going to the gym is killing me! But I know it’s what I have to do... Sometimes resting IS taking care of yourself.

Best of luck and keep us posted.

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15 hours ago, Aussie Bear said:

I kind of wish this was posted a few days ago. I watched a documentary on the benefits of exercise that used various research papers and concluded that beyond a certain level exercise no longer had any benefit to the body. I really wish I could remember the name now, but if I do come across it again I'll definitely post here. From memory the makers of the documentary and their researchers discovered that the body response to exercise is like it's response to diet, in that there is a point where the metabolic rate increases brought about by exercise actually stop in a starvation mode style like diet produces. I'm pretty sure they also concluded that the higher the level of exercise the body is regularly subjected to, the more exercise it will require before the metabolic effects will kick in. 

It would seem our bodies are determined to stay where they want to be regardless of what we might want for them.

         This sounds like a very interesting film. If you find out what it was please let me know.

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        Being a former collegiate athlete (football and wrestling) we were taught  about building muscle mass and converting fat to muscle. We were also taught how to cut weight rapidly and safely, hence my extreme level of hydration and exercise drive. We were not informed on how to lose excess body weight for the long term, because this was never an issue and metabolism was a non factor due to the high level of continuous daily strenuous exercise. With or without metabolic rate increases exercise burns calories. With anaerobic exercise you can burn more calories in 2hrs than your body will use naturally all day, this is not including any metabolic rate increase. This simplified formula works for rapid weight loss but is not sustainable long term. I have used this process multiple times (5+) in the past, with only 2 weeks between football and wrestling, I would cut 40lbs, from 325 (football weight) to 285lbs (max weight for wrestling).

         That being said, I believe, this truly did crash my metabolism. Once I was done with college and no longer had a need for the 4-6 hrs a day of exercise, I cut back to a more relaxed rate of about an hour a day for couple years. During this time frame my caloric intake was the same as in college and I ballooned to over 450lbs. That was the first time I took a serious look at needing to change my life style. I learned about metabolism and where I should be caloric-wise to lose weight. Even working with Dr.s and dieticians, I had to consume far less calories (500-1000 less per day) than estimated and do extra exercise to lose weight. I went through this process several times over the years. I fluctuated up and down as much as 100lbs over any given year. The process being very strenuous on my body and mind, led me to call it quits about 3 yrs ago.

         I stagnated at 460lbs for over a year and my gallbladder quit working, forcing me to cut fats in my diet down to 10g or less a day. I lost weight on this new diet without exercise or any real effort due to getting sick anytime I stepped out of line, its was miserable, this is the first time ever tracked macros. Prior diet and exercise regiments all revolved around calorie intake and output. I had my gallbladder removed July 29, 2016. I was able to add fats back into my diet without getting sick. Between gallbladder surgery and May 2, 2017 I went from 402lbs to 504lbs.

         That's when I decided to look into bariatric surgery. With a family history of early onset heart disease and diabetes I knew I needed to get my weight under control so I could be around for my wife and son long term. I went to every support group meeting, educational class and bariatric conference available in my area, as well as read in depth studies on several different surgery options. During the six months leading up to surgery, I learned more about nutrition and the affects of macros on my body than I had ever learned in total before. This new information led to a 97lb weight loss during that time frame without anymore added exercise than I was already doing. Hydrating fluid consumption became key and still remains key today.

         I believe by getting my macros appropriately aligned and ample hydrating fluid consumption I have reset my metabolism to a working fashion again. Other than the last few weeks I have felt 100x better than I have since leaving college. Over the last few weeks I began pushing myself exercise wise again, I believe this has thrown off the balance I found with my macros and fluid making me have the unexpected issues. The last few days I have cut back my exercise and refound that balance. I am glad to report no orthostatic hypotension or reactive hypoglycemic incidences since Wednesday. This is truly a learning process, I will have to continually find that balance as my body changes and my exercise fluctuates.

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10 hours ago, Jen581791 said:

Wow, @AustinJ, glad you’re doing some troubleshooting and are willing to take the measures your doctors have recommended. Take it easy a bit, eh? ;)

I totally understand your desire to just hurry up and get there. I felt that way, too (although I’m apparently not as driven as you). I’m currently trying really hard to take it easy until my hip gets better. I injured the opposite knee in December but didn’t stay off of it enough and have pain in the opposite hip due to compensation while limping around on it. Not going to the gym is killing me! But I know it’s what I have to do... Sometimes resting IS taking care of yourself.

Best of luck and keep us posted.

Thank you for the support Jen, you are an inspiration! Congrats on the surgiversary.

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@AustinJ i know you have your lego gig, but you really should have gone into exercise physiologist!  you know so much about it and are an expert in your own rite!

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5 hours ago, CheeringCJ said:

@AustinJ i know you have your lego gig, but you really should have gone into exercise physiologist!  you know so much about it and are an expert in your own rite!

LOL, I must not know enough, I almost landed my self in the hospital earlier this week by over doing it.

I never really cared about any of it until I was in college and we had to learn about it. The sports nutrition program cared more to teach us what we needed to stay alive through the extreme physical conditioning that was required for collegiate athletics than to teach us the in and outs of how to care for our bodies for life.  Its taken me 10 years of failures to get to this point. As Thomas Edison Said “I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work.”

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11 hours ago, AustinJ said:

LOL, I must not know enough, I almost landed my self in the hospital earlier this week by over doing it.

I never really cared about any of it until I was in college and we had to learn about it. The sports nutrition program cared more to teach us what we needed to stay alive through the extreme physical conditioning that was required for collegiate athletics than to teach us the in and outs of how to care for our bodies for life.  Its taken me 10 years of failures to get to this point. As Thomas Edison Said “I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work.”

Well, I suppose that is true....you know just enough to be dangerous, as they say...haha!  stick with the Minifigs!!! ;) 

Seriously though, you do know a lot (and are still learning)....I picture you being a part time personal trainer when all is said and done!

Edited by CheeringCJ

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1 hour ago, CheeringCJ said:

Well, I suppose that is true....you know just enough to be dangerous, as they say...haha!  stick with the Minifigs!!! ;) 

Seriously though, you do know a lot (and are still learning)....I picture you being a part time personal trainer when all is said and done!

That is a possibility, I have helped develop strength training programs for local athletics before.

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13 hours ago, AustinJ said:

LOL, I must not know enough, I almost landed my self in the hospital earlier this week by over doing it.

I never really cared about any of it until I was in college and we had to learn about it. The sports nutrition program cared more to teach us what we needed to stay alive through the extreme physical conditioning that was required for collegiate athletics than to teach us the in and outs of how to care for our bodies for life.  Its taken me 10 years of failures to get to this point. As Thomas Edison Said “I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work.”

Just to echo @CheeringCJ I find these posts very useful. Just came out of an intense work period with no exercise and hitting the gym again - did 888 calories yesterday (well that's what the calculators and gizmos said) and hoping to keep this pace up for at least a month. My intake is about maintenance for me at my current weight so maybe with this I will get under 200... have achieved my health goals so that is a vanity goal!

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