Readytobeme

Surgery VS. Diet

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I have been thinking about this for a long time. From what I am reading it is fairly easy to lose weight after WLS. But, after 12-18 months when the honeymoon period ends, it seems that most people get their appetite back and it is easy to regain.

So, how is the surgery helpful compared to just dieting and taking the weight off? Seems like I have been through the same thing so many times. Lose the weight just to gain it all back eventually. I know that the weight loss can be maintained if we are vigilant but, same could be said for dieting as well.

I am having the surgery for certain. This has been on my mind and I would like to see what some of you think about this. Why is maintenance easier post op then it is with just dieting? Sooooooo many people seem to gain a good bit of the weight back eventually.

I know about restriction but if a person is hungry they could just graze. Am I right?

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My husband is very supportive but, he does have interesting comments at times. I was telling him that I would be eating mostly protein and staying 600-800 calories post op. His reply was that anyone can lose weight eating like that. I did explain the restriction and hopefully loss of appetite but that will likely be temporary.

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1 hour ago, Readytobeme said:

 Why is maintenance easier post op then it is with just dieting? Sooooooo many people seem to gain a good bit of the weight back even

Three words "metabolic set point"!

Sure we can gain it all back, but only by letting ourselves slip back into old habits. Even grazing doesn't have to cause regain if we choose our snacks wisely.

Fighting our stubborn  metabolisms without surgical intervention though is pretty much doomed to failure.

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The biggest difference to me is that now I have a tool to use that I never did before to help control my weight. Even if I were to get off track a bit I can only eat so much at a time and can't do the damage that I could before wls. People use the 5-day pouch test plan to get back on track if they have strayed as well. Going into this I decided I was tired of living to eat and needed to learn to eat to live. It does come down to discipline and how bad a person wants it in the end, but I'm so thankful that I had the surgery and I have a confidence with my new tool that I never had before. Make a list of pro's and con's maybe and ask yourself what your priorities are and what you'd like them to be. Best of luck to you.

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I’ve lost and gained many times. The difference for me so far is that I’ve been able to use this year of “I don’t care about food and I’m not hungry” to renegotiate my relationship with food. It’s not entertainment or comfort. It’s just food now. I don’t have the metabolic reaction to food that I used to (blood sugar rising then dropping, hunger hormones kicking in, etc). Going forward, I hope my metabolism has been fixed a bit, and research makes that look likely. On one previous regain, I managed to get up to about 165-170 eating 1200 calories per day! I don’t think that will happen this time. 

 

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I picked the surgery (sleeve) I did because of the hormonal benefits the medical community is only beginning to understand. They may not be able to explain them, but I certainly FEEL them, and they are a key to my success. Prior to surgery, when I used to eat the way I am now (low carb, high protein, low calorie), I used to feel terrible. Headaches, jaw aches, shoulder tension, lethargy, and constantly feeling hungry and deprived. I feel none of that now. Anyone can eat this way, but surgery makes it so much easier, and I feel so much better overall while doing it.

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I agree with all of the excellent points above.  In addition, the honeymoon period, besides allowing you to lose weight fairly quickly and without much of an appetite, gives you many months to develop and enjoy a new and more healthy "relationship with food."  Thus, when/if your appetite returns you will be prepare to deal with it because you will realize by then that food is not your friend, food is not a proper source of comfort, eating is not be viewed as a form of entertainment, and (perhaps most importantly) that no food is worth eating if it will result in gaining weight and losing all the joys of being thin, healthy and more active.  

For example, I no longer eat Oreo cookies (which I loved before my surgery), not because they won't taste good (I'm sure that they will), but because I know that I enjoy and appreciate my current life maintaining at (or just below) my goal weight so very much more than the taste of Oreos. 

Yes, many people do regain weight after their honeymoon period.  I suspect that all (or at least almost all) of them went back to their old bad habits of viewing food as a source of joy, comfort and entertainment.

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On 2/13/2018 at 4:12 AM, Res Ipsa said:

I agree with all of the excellent points above.  In addition, the honeymoon period, besides allowing you to lose weight fairly quickly and without much of an appetite, gives you many months to develop and enjoy a new and more healthy "relationship with food."  ......

...... 

This probably sums it up for me too.

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Most longitudinal studies show that the majority of WLS patients maintain at least a 50% excess weight loss after 5 years. 

I've never lost 50% of my excess weight on my own. Hell, I've never managed 20% of my excess weight on my own. While I would love to lose 80-100% of my excess weight, if I only hit 50% and stayed there, I'd be pretty content in my choices. 

There are always outliers. There are always people who know a friend of a friend who gained all their weight back and then some. But then, there are always people who use their surgery as a means to eat all the wrong foods, refuse to confront their food problems, and refuse to exercise.

Don't let them scare you off from it. 

 

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14 minutes ago, delilas said:

Most longitudinal studies show that the majority of WLS patients maintain at least a 50% excess weight loss after 5 years. 

I've never lost 50% of my excess weight on my own. Hell, I've never managed 20% of my excess weight on my own. While I would love to lose 80-100% of my excess weight, if I only hit 50% and stayed there, I'd be pretty content in my choices. 

There are always outliers. There are always people who know a friend of a friend who gained all their weight back and then some. But then, there are always people who use their surgery as a means to eat all the wrong foods, refuse to confront their food problems, and refuse to exercise.

Don't let them scare you off from it. 

 

I agree,  I lost all of my excess weight in about 10 months and have kept it off since then (except for adding 5 pounds to my goal weight about a year ago at the request of my wife who thought that I was too skinny).

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Thanks, everyone. @delilas no way will I be scared off from this surgery. I am more than ready to have it done.

I talked to quite a few people at the hospital that I am going to have this done that also had WLS. A few of them were not successful but did admit it was their own fault.

Once my husband saw and heard the stories of these people, I found it hard to come up with reasons that it is best to have the surgery done and that I WILL be successful where others failed. I knew that there were many reasons but for some reason I just drew a blank as to what they are.

Thanks to everyone for the input. I will be referring back to this thread next time something comes up that I don't have the answer for.

I think that I will be much like Gretta and the help with the hormones alone will be a huge help for me.

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In my late 20's I lost 100 pounds in a year. Within 4 years I'd gained 40 - 50 pounds back. In my early 40's I had WLS. I lost 140 pounds in less than 18 months. 4 years later I am pretty much at the weight I want to be. I got down to 159 at my lowest which was too low for me. I am happiest with my body in the 170's. When I lost over 100 pounds before WLS, I was hungry ALL THE TIME. I said NO to eating out, going to parties and doing other social things that involved food because I was so scared I would lose control and start eating the way I used to. Now, I say yes to nearly everything and I don't pay much attention to the food. I care FAR less about food than ever before WLS. In part, I had to admit and then learn how to manage my food addiction.

 

Even though my honeymoon is  long over and my hunger came back, I can go hours without eating or even thinking about food. Perfect example, I hosted a party for 40 people on Sunday. I ordered the cake and several kinds of cookies. I bought all the food to be served on Friday night and spent part of Friday, Saturday and Sunday prepping it. Almost none of the food was WLS-friendly. Chips, dips, candy, booze, etc. There was a veggie plate, a cheese plate and a fruit plate but most of what we served was a carb lover's dream. What I was most interested in was having a glass of wine in the fun disco ball cups I ordered. I had one bite of an oatmeal cookie because I was told it was the best of the cookies. I was handed a piece of cake. I had 3 - 4 bites of the icing and gave the rest to my husband. Pre-op I would have obsessed about the food for weeks before the party. I would have made all things I liked rather than what would have appealed to the guests. I would have started snacking hours before the party, ate through out the party and then continued to snack while I was putting everything away. My guess is I had 500 calories in party food and most of those would have been in the wine I drank. Pre-op I would have easily had 5,000 calories. 

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9 hours ago, Stephtay said:

In my late 20's I lost 100 pounds in a year. Within 4 years I'd gained 40 - 50 pounds back. In my early 40's I had WLS. I lost 140 pounds in less than 18 months. 4 years later I am pretty much at the weight I want to be. I got down to 159 at my lowest which was too low for me. I am happiest with my body in the 170's. When I lost over 100 pounds before WLS, I was hungry ALL THE TIME. I said NO to eating out, going to parties and doing other social things that involved food because I was so scared I would lose control and start eating the way I used to. Now, I say yes to nearly everything and I don't pay much attention to the food. I care FAR less about food than ever before WLS. In part, I had to admit and then learn how to manage my food addiction.

It's like you're spying on my brain. I did exactly this when I was 29 - lost 80+ pounds and eliminated all socializing because I couldn't trust myself around food. I was starving all the time. And I regained by continuing to eat 1200 calories per day :( Now I just don't care about food. I feel like I've been released from Food Jail. Sweet freedom!!!

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11 hours ago, Jen581791 said:

Now I just don't care about food. I feel like I've been released from Food Jail. Sweet freedom!!!

Yes, released from Food Jail! It is a whole different world - isn't it?! 

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