ThinCVT

Two years ago today.....

Recommended Posts

.....I started my preop diet.  I consider this my anniversary date rather than my actual surgery since I lost 22 pounds on the preop.  Since surgery I have lost over 100% of my excess weight and have kept it off for over a year.  I don't measure or track my food.  I don't own a scale.  I never obsessed over numbers or details.  I just stuck with mostly protein and veggies while I was losing and stayed away from the "white carbs".  
 
For maintenance I simply eat a healthy balanced diet including protein, veggies, fruit and whole grains.  I make healthy choices (most of the time) and my sleeve helps control my portions.  I still indulge in sweets, desserts, alcohol, bread, rice, potatoes, etc, but definitely in moderation.  I still drink protein shakes and eat protein bars.  Although I don't officially track, I do keep a rough tally of protein and fluids and usually exceed 70g protein and drink 64-100+ oz of fluids every day.  I take my vitamins every day.  I have bloodwork checked annually as recommended by my surgeon.  I don't excercise but I have a physical job and active lifestyle.   It really has been a pretty easy journey.
 
So here's a recap some of my favorite year 1 NSVs....
 
I can cross my legs.  I can even cross them in a car and under a table.
 
I can hop up into my saddle without having to find a rock or log to climb on.  I feel so relieved that my horse no longer has to pack my fat @*# around the mountains.
 
No more knee, ankle or foot pain.  I lived on ibuprofen and tramadol before surgery.  I am now completely pain free. I can also squat down and kneel effortlessly without my feet going numb or needing a table or chair to heave myself back up.
 
I can sprint up stairs or hike up a hill without getting out of breath at all.  I've been on 15-20 mile hikes with friends and I am always out front, waiting for them to catch up.
 
I can shop in regular stores.  I can order clothes online and I know they will fit and look great.  I now dress to show off my body, not to hide it.
 
Now for year 2.....
 
Maintenance is boring.  NSVs are few and far between.  Everything is just "normal" now.  Spent most of the year finding and keeping that balance between what my head wants and what I know I actually need.  I rarely weigh myself, but I will step on the scale at work after an especially carby weekend or vacation.  I go back to strict protein/veggies or even full on preop liquid diet if I pop even one pound above my bounce range.  I know I have to nip any small gains in the bud before they become big gains.
 
But this year also brought about the biggest NSV of all.  It has nothing to do with my weight, it's all about my head and it's one I would love to not have experienced.  My best friend committed suicide 7 months ago and every day since has been a miserable struggle with the grief, anger, despair and confusion.  The victory in this is that I haven't buried my emotions with food and alcohol.  I spent over 1 1/2 years drinking and stuffing my face after my brother died 4 years ago.  In the end that only impeded my ability to heal and made me even fatter and more miserable.  I learned that you have to feel the pain before you can over come it.  So this time I'm feeling it all.  And it sucks.  I will never stop grieving either my brother or my friend, but maybe some day I can start living again, rather just going through the motions.
 
Anyways, thanks for reading this extended post, and good luck to all you newbies.  My advice is don't get wallowed down in the "now".  Don't be overwhelmed by the details. Life is more than just carbs and protein and minutes at the gym. You chose a chance at a new life....for the rest of your life.  The first few months are just a teeny tiny period and simply part of the process you have to go through.
 
First photo collage taken December 4, 2013 and December 4, 2014
Second set taken this morning.......I just had my gallbladder removed 8 days ago, so that's what's up with the new scars.  My belly is still a little swollen from surgery, too.  I also got a new tat last February - a tribute to my brother who was a wonderfully talented musician.
 
IMG_0455.thumb.jpg.fab0bab399d82279ad258
IMG_1155.thumb.JPG.e68b8ac6cd14bbec288fe
 
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow. Powerful words, messages, and pictures. Amazing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Happy 2nd surgiversary!

Your transformation is totally amazing - you've done an amazing job!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

some hard times for you,  but also many successes.  you can be proud.  and you look great.

keep up the good work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the inspiration!! I am definitely an emotional eater, I see a doctor specifically for this now. Your words of feeling the pain and grief are so true. Thanks again for being a warrior!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fantastic and inspirational.  Congrats on everything you've accomplished.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow thank you! You look and sound .

 Thank you for sharing 

 

Stephen 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
.....I started my preop diet.  I consider this my anniversary date rather than my actual surgery since I lost 22 pounds on the preop.  Since surgery I have lost over 100% of my excess weight and have kept it off for over a year.  I don't measure or track my food.  I don't own a scale.  I never obsessed over numbers or details.  I just stuck with mostly protein and veggies while I was losing and stayed away from the "white carbs".  
 
For maintenance I simply eat a healthy balanced diet including protein, veggies, fruit and whole grains.  I make healthy choices (most of the time) and my sleeve helps control my portions.  I still indulge in sweets, desserts, alcohol, bread, rice, potatoes, etc, but definitely in moderation.  I still drink protein shakes and eat protein bars.  Although I don't officially track, I do keep a rough tally of protein and fluids and usually exceed 70g protein and drink 64-100+ oz of fluids every day.  I take my vitamins every day.  I have bloodwork checked annually as recommended by my surgeon.  I don't excercise but I have a physical job and active lifestyle.   It really has been a pretty easy journey.
 
So here's a recap some of my favorite year 1 NSVs....
 
I can cross my legs.  I can even cross them in a car and under a table.
 
I can hop up into my saddle without having to find a rock or log to climb on.  I feel so relieved that my horse no longer has to pack my fat @*# around the mountains.
 
No more knee, ankle or foot pain.  I lived on ibuprofen and tramadol before surgery.  I am now completely pain free. I can also squat down and kneel effortlessly without my feet going numb or needing a table or chair to heave myself back up.
 
I can sprint up stairs or hike up a hill without getting out of breath at all.  I've been on 15-20 mile hikes with friends and I am always out front, waiting for them to catch up.
 
I can shop in regular stores.  I can order clothes online and I know they will fit and look great.  I now dress to show off my body, not to hide it.
 
Now for year 2.....
 
Maintenance is boring.  NSVs are few and far between.  Everything is just "normal" now.  Spent most of the year finding and keeping that balance between what my head wants and what I know I actually need.  I rarely weigh myself, but I will step on the scale at work after an especially carby weekend or vacation.  I go back to strict protein/veggies or even full on preop liquid diet if I pop even one pound above my bounce range.  I know I have to nip any small gains in the bud before they become big gains.
 
But this year also brought about the biggest NSV of all.  It has nothing to do with my weight, it's all about my head and it's one I would love to not have experienced.  My best friend committed suicide 7 months ago and every day since has been a miserable struggle with the grief, anger, despair and confusion.  The victory in this is that I haven't buried my emotions with food and alcohol.  I spent over 1 1/2 years drinking and stuffing my face after my brother died 4 years ago.  In the end that only impeded my ability to heal and made me even fatter and more miserable.  I learned that you have to feel the pain before you can over come it.  So this time I'm feeling it all.  And it sucks.  I will never stop grieving either my brother or my friend, but maybe some day I can start living again, rather just going through the motions.
 
Anyways, thanks for reading this extended post, and good luck to all you newbies.  My advice is don't get wallowed down in the "now".  Don't be overwhelmed by the details. Life is more than just carbs and protein and minutes at the gym. You chose a chance at a new life....for the rest of your life.  The first few months are just a teeny tiny period and simply part of the process you have to go through.
 
First photo collage taken December 4, 2013 and December 4, 2014
Second set taken this morning.......I just had my gallbladder removed 8 days ago, so that's what's up with the new scars.  My belly is still a little swollen from surgery, too.  I also got a new tat last February - a tribute to my brother who was a wonderfully talented musician.
 
IMG_0455.thumb.jpg.fab0bab399d82279ad258
IMG_1155.thumb.JPG.e68b8ac6cd14bbec288fe
 
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find this very iinspiring. I am just getting prepared for my journey. I have always taken care of everybody else but decided it'seems my time. So I am older than most getting started. I am 68 yrs young and scared to death. But even this is not going to stop me. I hope to have my surGerman by mid Feb. So keep on inspiring me!   SNOOKS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for sharing. Made my day reading your story. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Congrats to you and thanks for posting this.   I really appreciated reading it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow!  First I am so sorry about your brother and friend. Truly heartbreaking.

But here you are...seriously an inspiration, and I am thankful that you shared all of that.  You look amazing too!

Thank you so much!

Donna

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now