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Long plateau and now slowly gaining back


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I'm coming up on 3 years post sleeve in March 2016.  I did really well the first 6-8 months when I couldn't eat much and stuck to the protein, began exercising, etc.  Then, I didn't change a thing and was still doing everything I had been doing but the weight loss just stopped when I had lost 92 pounds.  After many months of that, I decided I was OK at that weight because I had lost that much, felt so much better, etc.  Then, about 6 months ago, I saw the scale start to creep back up a few times.  At first, it would be 2-3 pounds and then it would be gone again.  Then it would be 2-3 pounds and all but 1 pound of it gone again, then 2-3 pounds and then all but 2 of it gone.  Until, before I knew it I had gained back 10 pounds.  I know I have started eating things I shouldn't but my biggest problem now seems to be that I can eat a WHOLE lot more than I could back when the weight was falling off.  And, I don't stay full for nearly as long as I did so I find myself snacking more and more.

Any advice from someone having gone through this same thing?  I do NOT want to gain the weight back and I still do get full a lot faster than before surgery, but I feel like I am slipping back into my pre-surgery mode of sort of grazing.  None of my clothes are fitting me and that is very depressing.

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.  I know I have started eating things I shouldn't but my biggest problem now seems to be that I can eat a WHOLE lot more than I could back when the weight was falling off.  And, I don't stay full for nearly as long as I did so I find myself snacking more and more.

 

Those two sentences have everything to do with eachother. If you are eating the wrong foods (slider foods) then yes, you will be able to eat a lot more of them than you can dense protein, AND you won't stay full very long. Go back to dense protein and veggies at every meal, and eat the protein first, not the veggies. 

Also, are you drinking when eating, or too soon after eating? That makes a huge difference it seems, because it flushes out the food too fast. 

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I am just shy of 2 years and yes, what you describe is just about the same as me.  The first 8 -10 months were so easy.  No matter what I did I lost weight.  But then the restriction lessened (I probably hit my max capacity around 14 months) and all kinds of snacking and other bad behaviors tried to sneak in.  However, I was told over and over again by the veterans on the WLS forums that this would happen.  I needed to spend that honeymoon period developing new habits, I would have to be mentally strong to resist temptation.  I would have to develop new coping strategies that didn't involve food.  And they were right.  I get hungry, too, but I either choose a healthy snack or suck it up.  A few hours of being hungry never killed anyone.

At this point my sleeve does nothing besides prevent me from gorging on huge portions of food.  It's all on me at this point....the portions, the grazing, the snacking and making the right food choices.  So I do what I've got to do.  I eat a healthy, balanced diet of all food groups.  I do eat some of the "bad" carbs but moderation....maybe a few times/month.  I never let myself get even one pound over my bounce range.  If I do, I go back to strict protein and veggies, or even a few days of liquid preop diet.  I do this till I'm at the bottom of my range (I stay between 138 and 142).  This not only drops the lb's, but also resets my head and gets me back on track to eating the way we are supposed to.  I refuse to let any little gain turn into a big gain.

kinda sounds like you gave up as soon as you actually had to put some effort into it.  But success comes to those who never give up.  Some people take years to reach their goal weight, but they never stop trying.  You just need to recommit to your journey.  Think about why you had this surgery in the first place.  What motivated you?  Go back to basics.  Start like its day 1 postop and go through your food transitions.  This is more about fixing your head than fixing your sleeve.  You can do this.  Every single day is a challenge and every day is an opportunity to do it right.  it is a lifelong commitment but one that is certainly worth the effort.

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I still don't drink for a while after eating because my stomach wouldn't hold it and it would hurt.  I need to start filling my plate with smaller portions because one thing I have found is that I get full easy, push the plate away, and then pick it back up as soon as the full feeling starts to subside.

Yes, it does sound like I gave up when the effort is on me, but honestly I wake up every morning and bring the right foods with me to work and the correct portion and most days I do really good until I get home.  That is where the problem lies.  Too many tempting foods with others living in the house and night has always been my problem anyway.

But, I am starting to feel like crap again, knees hurting, low energy, etc.  So, I want to push that reset button and stop just "trying" and actually start "doing".  I am not getting any younger and I was one that had to self-pay for my surgery and that was supposed to be an investment in my life and longevity.

Thanks!

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You've identified: 

when (night)

 where (home)

the why(self-pay, knees hurting) 

how (smaller portions, planned meal times)

You've got this!!!!!! Keep us updated. 

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I can't add much more to the great advice already given here.  I gained 40lbs back my 2nd year post sleeve....after losing 200.   What is 40lbs compared to 200?  Not much technically but that also isn't the point.  The point is I put it back on.  And I have had to work 5x as hard as I did that first year just to take off 15 of it.

You have to set your environment up for success and hopefully the people that live with you love you and understand enough that things may need to be different for a while.  I had to "ban" my BF from having some things in the house for a while because I can't control myself if they are here.  You don't necessarily have to be a nazi over every 'bad' thing in the house but pick one or two things....  is icecream and crackers your downfall?  Then tell them you need icecream and crackers to not be in the house for 1 month (or 2 or whatever).  Give yourself some time without it there tempting you in order to get back on track.

The fact is some of us are just going to struggle more then others.  Its unfair and it sucks but it is what it is.  I'd love to be like some who have total control over food now;  I envy them beyond envy them!  That just isn't my lot and so I have to deal with the best I can....  but continueing to try and not giving up.  So I gained 40lbs back -  I got back on track and lost 15 -  so I gained 10lbs of that back again -  I need to get back on track and continue the course.  I can't ever give up.  If I give up I will be 400lbs again.  I am happy at 220's having lost my weight but I also know I can and have done better and so I strive for that again.

 

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Thanks everyone for the tips, personal stories, and inspiration.  I'll start with 1 day, today, and build upon it.  I had hoped this surgery would be the magic bullet I had always dreamed of and I wouldn't have to struggle anymore, but alas, that is not to be.  I have to be accountable now and the doctor and others always told me it was a tool in the tool-shed.  Now, I have to pick it back up and learn how to use it again.

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Listen to Jolls....she is an inspiration.  I feel like a fresh newbie next to her.  She has come so much farther than me and like I mentioned before, she is a true success in the sense that she doesn't ever give up.  She was the one who helped me find success with the back to basics liquid diet reset and I am truly grateful.

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What everyone else said and maybe try the five day pouch test to get a restart and reset your carb cravings? You can do this!!

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No magic bullet.  My honeymoon lasted 15 months and my body got to a weight it was comfortable at.  I did have a regain of 15 pounds last winter which took me 6 months to lose.   The surgery is only part of the recovery from food addiction.   I can eat more, but don't.  Everyone is different, but what has worked best for me is no sugar, low carbs.  I eat 3 meals and usually a late afternoon snack if dinner is going to be late.  It is a choice we make each day toward self care.  Some days are easier than others.  As Jolls and others have said,  just don't give up.  

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  • 2 weeks later...

Human bodies puzzle me, it seems that if we continue to do better than we would've ever dreamed of doing before surgery regain would never be a problem, and it's not in a lot of cases but for those whose bodies want to get back to their sweet spot (fat) it is a struggle that will always be there. Quite a sobering thought but it is what it is....

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thank you  for your sharing and honhonesty. lightening and inspiring! 

Stephen 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hey SCBeachGirl!  Just wondering how things are going.....

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