Jabsie

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About Jabsie

  • Rank
    Senior Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
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Information

  • Surgeon
    Dr. Namir Katkhouda
  • Hospital
    USC - Keck Medical Center
  • Height (ft-in)
    5-05
  • Start Weight
    278
  • Current Weight
    199
  • Goal Weight
    164
  • Surgery Date
    9/2/2015
  • Surgery Type
    Vertical Sleeve

Recent Profile Visitors

3,479 profile views
  1. Jabsie

    Going bald! Help!

    Hair loss is a total drag. I'm sorry you're experiencing it. It may end of being one of those things you just have to wait out. It will not last and your hair will grow back. A couple of suggestions in the interim are to try not to keep hair pulled back in tight ponytails or buns, or at least alternate with hair-down styles from day to day. Pulling on the root can contribute to hair loss or breakage. Changing over to shorter styles or at least taking a few inches off, may also help. Some feel that taking biotin and keeping their protein up helps. Hang in there!
  2. Jabsie

    4+ years post sleeve

    "Treat your body like it belongs to someone you love." I love this, thank you!
  3. Jabsie

    Cpap after surgery

    I think you should wait until your doc gives you the ok. I would imagine that they will either use the data from your machine if you have one that does this or ask you to do another sleep study or have your loved ones observe you while you sleep without it. My hubby has tried a ton of different devices, none of which worked. The only thing that does is the cpap and has refused to wear it for the same reasons I suspect you hate it. He has a number of other health issues that are impacted by weight too so his doc has recommended WLS. Despite my success with it, his fear of surgery is preventing him from moving forward. The cpap is something we argue about regularly and honestly, I'm terrified he's going to die in his sleep without it.
  4. Jabsie

    Am I the only one that is FREEZING??

    I get much colder now than I did before WLS even in the LA "winter" where I live. My husband is from north east Canada and has pretty much worn shorts year round. The battles over the thermostat have escalated to epic proportions ;-)
  5. Man-o-man can I relate! I was going to post on this very topic today :-) My entire life I felt like I could eat a TON of food at one sitting. My hubby is 6'4" and a big guy and I could eat the same amount as him easily. Post op was the first time I ever felt limited by how much I could eat and the first time I ever experienced what it was like to not have the desire to eat as a constant companion. I lost most of my weight within 9 months of my surgery and got to goal by month 10, 119 lbs total. In the past year I regained about 35. My self talk has been so very similar to yours yet the feedback is so different. What I'd say to you is so much kinder than what I've been saying to myself. This conversation is really helping me to see that. Although you've had a setback, you haven't failed at WLS. The surgery and weight loss are just the short beginning. It's the rest of our lives that make up the bulk of our stories. For many, regain is part of the story. I have to remember that the surgery was only a starter....my commitment to changing my behavior is the fuel. I have to accept that short of a revision, I'm never going to feel the level of restriction in the first post-op months. God do I miss it. I'm a fan of analogies so here's what I've been thinking of recently (forgive any crudeness).... Having WLS is a little like falling in love with the right person. At first, it's easy. The person is at the center of your thoughts all day long and the sex is great. You can't wait to see them and getting to know them is so exciting. Here's the thing most of us know about true and lasting love.....when the early passion fades, and it usually does, you'd better have something to replace it. I'm madly in love with my husband but who we are now as a couple is very different than who we were in the beginning. We don't consume each other's thoughts the way we did when we first fell in love but our marriage is foundational to our lives. And just like in marriage, cracks will form in the foundation of my WL success if I take it for granted. I have to start by being honest with myself. Some reasons I think I've regained weight: Return to some pre-WLS eating behaviors Reduced exercise Taking my WL success for granted. I got too comfortable and took my eyes off the prize. I still think like a fat person. WLS isn't brain surgery I stopped doing many of the things that led to my WL success early on Reduced sensation of restriction Not accounting for potential weight gain caused by new medication and peri menopause What I know works for me: Track and limit my intake to between 1100-1200 calories, focus on protein first, and drink 80+ oz of water. Include my health goals when entering in my bullet journal every day. Click the link to learn more about bullet journaling. Be mindful about my eating, eat slowly and be aware of obsessive food thoughts. Weigh myself first thing in the morning every day and document my weight. This is essential to remaining accountable. I've also taken body measurements monthly. This data has proven to be very useful on more than one occasion when I needed to test my perception against reality. There were weeks that I lost inches but not pounds. I try to think of weight loss in terms of percentages not pounds. For example: 5% of 200 = 10 but 5% of 180 = 9. The percentage lost is the same, just not the pounds. Here's how I do that calculation: Figure out the total percentage of my body weight I'd like to lose (pounds overweight divided by total current weight). Figure out a reasonable and healthy length of time in which I'd like to lose this weight. Calculate what percentage of weight needs to be lost each week to lose the total percentage within the targeted time. Exercise. I don't do this for weight loss but it is very complimentary to my weight loss/maintenance/health efforts. Keep the things I want to avoid eating out of the house. This is a big one. If I know something is in my pantry, it will call to me all day. Besides, if it isn't good for me it probably isn't good for anyone else in the house either. All eating should be planned. I have to remember that I have little restraint for some things so it's best just to not to eat them at all. For me, saying no to the second cookie is way harder than saying no to the first one. With the previous bullet in mind, allowing for the occasional indulgence (a piece of cake on my birthday for instance) is healthy and key to being able to maintain my weight loss. It just has to be planned for ahead of time rather than a give-in to temptation. Practicing in extremes when I'm trying to learn how to live in moderation doesn't work great for me long term. When I do trip up, don't beat myself up. What I know about me is that the only thing that makes me feel better about anything is action. I have to try my best to take my emotions out of this and focus on the things that I know work for me. OK, I went on a lot longer than I should have....best of luck with everything. Please let me know how you're making out!
  6. Kim - I totally understand why you feel conflicted. As you and others have noted, the RNY isn't WLS, it's GERD surgery. If you had gallstones, you probably wouldn't feel the same way about having your gallbladder removed. Perhaps looking at it through that lens might help reconcile some of your feelings. You are already WL success story without the RNY.....and an inspiration to the rest of us :-) Good luck with your procedure. I'm sure everything will go smoothly.
  7. Jabsie

    Threw me for a loop...

    All humans have inherent biases, and Dr.'S are no exception. It's unfortunate that any physician would give professional advice about a topic for which they are not a specialist. The data doesn't lie and currently there is no treatment more effective for reversing morbid obesity than WLS. It's 5 times more successful at long term weight loss than any other known treatment. Also, complications and related death rates reduced dramatically once surgeons started utilizing the laparoscopic method.
  8. Jabsie

    The power of negative memories

    That's such a great story, thank you for sharing it! It's crazy, probably my biggest NSV is the same type of thing. Rarely was I more painfully reminded of just how big I was than when flying. I have to travel a lot for my career and I always dreaded being on the plane. Not because I am afraid to fly but because there was always the risk of the seatbelt not fitting, I'd be stuck in the middle seat, the seats were especially narrow, etc... There was one time when I couldn't close the seatbelt and hid the fact from the attendant just so I wouldn't have to ask for the extender. My hips were always squeezed and the arm rests dug into my sides.....not fun. Fast forward to my first trip post WLS. I nearly cried (and I'm not a public cryer) when I had significant slack left on the seatbelt and my sides didn't come anywhere near the armrests. I took a picture of the seatbelt! People probably thought I was crazy.
  9. I love this update so much. I have struggled with some regain recently and I really really need to read this today. Thank you and keep them coming!
  10. What a great post! Your husband is a sweet guy :-) The moment that comes to mind like that for me is being on my first flight post op. I regularly have to travel for work and had always dreaded being squeezed into the airplane seats. The seatbelt never fit comfortably and in some cases, not at all. Being able to sit comfortably and have slack on the seatbelt blew my mind. I remember taking a picture of it and thinking that this small thing was going to make a huge difference. Keep these stories coming, I love them!
  11. Jabsie

    I’ve shocked a few people this weekend

    That sounds awesome! Always nice to get feedback like that :-)
  12. Jabsie

    Reconnecting

    Hi Everyone! It's been a while so I wanted to check back in and reconnect with my peeps Never thought it would happen but it did. I got comfortable, over confident, and took my eyes off the road......then BAM! regain. About 6 months ago, the demands of my career increased dramatically and I let it divert my attention away from what should have been my highest priority, my health. My weight had been stable up until that point but I regained about 25 lbs at what felt like break neck speed. There's no mystery as to what I need to do. I know what works, I just need to do it. Posting here is part of that. Hoping this note finds you all well. XO - Jabsie
  13. Jabsie

    I lost my dad tonight

    My heart is breaking for you and your family. I am so very sorry about your loss. Please know that I'm thinking good thoughts for you.
  14. Jabsie

    1 week since surgery....

    A lot of people report going through a period of mourning after surgery. Perhaps you're experiencing this on some level as well. Regardless, try and cut yourself some slack and put a pause button on weather or not you got the surgery for the right reasons or not until after you get through this period. You might feel very differently when you're cleared to go to a full diet, your body has healed, and life with your new baby stomach is more normalized. The lens you're looking through right now is clouded by a whole bunch of things. Many many people experience sadness and depression post-op. With rapid weight loss your system is flooded with hormones that cause depression. For many of us, eating was our go-to coping mechanism for...well...everything. With that no longer an option, you may be feeling things more intensely than you did in the past. It's also really hard to be happy when you're in pain and fatigued. I so appreciate your honesty. This is really hard stuff. We're here for you.
  15. Jabsie

    Already struggling.....

    I did a year of research about surgery before I made the decision to proceed with it. During this time I came across some interesting post-op statistics. It appears that there are 4 common correlations among those who regain all or a substantial amount of their weight. They are as follows: Untreated childhood trauma, sexual abuse in particular (never getting professional help). This is the strongest indicator and is true for obesity as well as addiction in general. Not keeping up with doctors appointments both immediately and long term post-op. Failure to accept responsibility for behaviors that lead to obesity and seeing surgery as a cure rather than a tool. Living with persons (family in particular) that do not support a patient's lifestyle changes, actively engage in unhealthy eating behaviors, or attempt to sabotage the patient's efforts. An analogy might be trying to quit smoking when you live with smokers that have no desire or willingness to quit smoking. Just because people may fall into one of the above risk factors doesn't mean they can't be successful. They absolute can and do.