Cali2AK

Career Change

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Some major changes going on in my field right now.  I do community outreach to people who suffer with severe mental illness.  Love that everyday brings different set of issues and I get to work with people on improving their quality of life.  The funding for my position is in jeopardy.  I love my job, just hate the politics of it all.  So anticipating a possible lay off I started thinking about what else I could possible do.  Just kind of free floating thoughts.  Then I thought I should look into the Red Cross.  I went a step further and thought I should do this internationally.  Traveling around from one disaster area to another.  It's one way to see the world.  So then I think I am crazy and laugh about it.  But there is still a part of me that is thinking about it.  I went on their website to see what type of paying positions there are.  My TT friends  you are the only ones I have told about this. My family would not be thrilled.  Keeping my options open. 

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My changes have already started, and I'm still pre-op.  The changes weren't by my choice, but they turned out to work well in my favor.  

 

I started as a bank teller in 1996.  Then I became the teller manager.  In 2001 my branch was purchased and a brand new bank started. I worked my way up to VP (second in charge behind the CEO, very small bank).  Recently the bank failed in September and as of this coming Wednesday I will be out of work (I stayed on to help the FDIC wrap up).  While I'm sad that the employees lost their jobs and the bank can't continue its mission, this was personally a very good thing for me.  Although, overall, I enjoyed what I did, I spent much of my career there wondering if I should stay or go, but not having the courage to leave and being very resentful about a lot of things.  17 years is a long time in one place (I count my time with the other bank).  But, I have an awesome resume because of it and was always the one to take ANY opportunity that was thrown my way.  And there were a lot of them because of my work ethic and attitude.  I basically helped to build the bank from the ground up in terms of Operations.  But I was definitely ready to go by the time this failure happened.  It made it easy to leave since I had no choice.  So now I have the time to take care of my surgery (12/23!!) and recover.  I'll be OK on unemployment.  Luckily the hubby can pick up some overtime if needed.  I've already decided that I want to become a bank examiner and am in the process of applying for a few positions.  With the speed at which government moves, I've got plenty of time for surgery and recovery. :)

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There are two sides to every business, the profit making side and the expense side. You're far better off to be on the profit making side.

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I must say I have a job that I really like, and with each passing pound, it sems to be getting better and better. It must be my attitude, of course. I am in insurance, so it is sales, but also requires quite a bit of knowledge. This is my second career- I was an architect for 19 years, but the economy shot that all to hell.

I am looking forward to it getting better all the time, because unfortunately, sales is about how you look as much as your knowledge.

Kathy

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Well, I have decided to make some changes.  I am still pre-op.  Hormones are still intact.  :P  I am going back to school to get a degree in molecular biology. I may double major in chemistry.  Yes, I will have to leave my teaching career.  Of course, I was merely surviving.  I'm ready to live!  I really feel it is time to stop being afraid and do what I truly want to do.  Will everything be easy?  No, but I am ready for the challenge. :D

People often tell me that I'm "lucky". I smile and nod, but that kind of comment really irks me. Analyzing the elements of luck, I've discovered the 5 things it takes to be lucky: 1) be in the right place, 2) at the right time, 3) know you're there, 4) be prepared, and 5) be willing to take a risk. Do those things, and luck will find you. Education is an essential element of "preparation". Best of LUCK to you.

  

There are two sides to every business, the profit making side and the expense side. You're far better off to be on the profit making side.

  

I've been on both sides and agree with you.

I must say I have a job that I really like, and with each passing pound, it sems to be getting better and better. It must be my attitude, of course. I am in insurance, so it is sales, but also requires quite a bit of knowledge. This is my second career- I was an architect for 19 years, but the economy shot that all to hell.I am looking forward to it getting better all the time, because unfortunately, sales is about how you look as much as your knowledge.Kathy

Very true. Even people who aren't in "sales" need to understand that you have something to sell everyday - your credibility. Appearance is a part of that.

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I am calling this my blank slate year. 

 

I had surgery dec 18th so 2014 is all new as far as eating and habits changes. 

 

I quit caffeine and smoking as well.

 

Now for the job.  My husband is military so we move every 3 years or so.  It is difficult for me to really get a career.  I have a 4 year degree in business Finance and have worked in the finance field for several years now.  My last job was really good about transferring me. 

 

When we moved back to GA 6 months ago there was no transfer available.  I had been collecting unemployment up until Jan.  I have had  no luck finding work at all.  When ever I go on an interview I have the hole overqualified thing going on or you move too much.  However, if the job I am interviewing for is finance I cringe.  I have done it for so long because it is what I know, I am good at it and understand finances.  But dang is it hard work.  usually 6 day weeks, limited time off, never get to have holidays since that is the busiest time for the year.  And there seems to be no money in this field other then the place I was working. 

 

So back to the blank slat for 2014......  I am now a waitress.... again..... at 34.  I started there because I needed something to bring the money in and it was the only place that would hire me.  I have decided to go back to school.  Yes I have a degree but I want to get into the medical field.  I am going to school to get my vet tech certification.  will only take a year since I have most of the core classes.  I will no longer have to wear suits and heels.  I can wear scrubs!  and I will get to work with animals.  a big plus for me. 

 

I am excited about the change.  It is difficult on us financially for me to not work full time and I feel like a kid again since I work as a waitress and go to school but I love the freedom and the money isn't bad at all!!! 

 

Change is good, scary, but good. 

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 I am going to school to get my vet tech certification.  will only take a year since I have most of the core classes.  I will no longer have to wear suits and heels.  I can wear scrubs!  and I will get to work with animals.  a big plus for me. 

Good for you! Doing something you love is what it's all about.

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I'm going through a career dilemma at the moment.  Although I've made my decision I figured I'd share anyway.
 
I was at my former company for almost 20 years.  It was a very small start-up company and I wore many hats and climbed the ladder quickly during my time there.  Everyday was different.  Often frustrating, as small companies can sometimes be, but challenging and it really stretched me.  I was a manager.  I always had my hands in everything and I built an awesome resume.  Fast forward to last September when the company failed.  Afterwards, I was presented with an opportunity to hold an IT-type position (Company A).  I turned it down because that was the one aspect of my old job that was incredibly frustrating.  Also, I was contacted by a Federal agency about a job and it suddenly dawned on me that THIS is what I wanted to do.  Unfortunately, the job didn’t materialize (tough application process). I then spent some time on me (gall bladder removal and WLS) and also spent a lot of time trying to figure out which aspects of the old job were most appealing so I could start applying for jobs in the new year. Because I was so enamored when the Federal agency reached out to me, I concluded I wanted to get into a job dealing with compliance regulations (one aspect of my old job).  Company A contacted me in early December before my second surgery, wanting to talk about another opportunity.  I didn’t reply right away, but eventually I emailed twice and never heard back.  So end of January comes and I hear from a former colleague who wants to know if I’m interested in a job at her company (Company B).  It was a newly created position.  I interviewed.  End of the week comes and CEO at Company A calls me to talk about the opportunity he emailed about in December.  I listened, but told him I want to see what happens with B, as that is the direction I want to go.  I got the job at B the very next day and started a few weeks ago.  I emailed A and said sorry, but I would keep him in mind if this doesn’t work out.  When I parked my car in the lot on the first day I got this overwhelming feeling that I was in the wrong place.  Hadn’t even gotten out of the car yet.  It’s a slightly bigger company, but it’s so segregated.  Meaning, everyone  has their own job and there’s no overlap.  I can’t just jump in and write a custom report or trouble shoot what’s wrong with the core processing system.  That’s what Sally or Bob are for.  I feel very boxed in and realized that thinking about working in compliance again isn't what I want to do.  I’m not a manager anymore and am now a worker bee (I thought I wanted to be a worker bee with less stress).  All I can think about is the exciting, high-level projects I’d be working on at B (even with the long commute).   So, a week later I was completely plagued with doubts, wondering if I made a huge mistake.  This was my biggest fear, that after being in one place for so many years I would pick the wrong job and be doomed to eternal misery.  And I did exactly what I was trying to avoid.  
 
I know people should try to stick it out in a new job for 6 months to a year, but I just couldn't face that. But I felt terrible about leaving the new boss in a lurch (down one person, new system, etc.).  I must have asked 8 different people and all except 2 told me to call company A and ask for the job.  I then visited the psychologist that did my pre-surgery evaluation, just to talk with someone who has no stake in it.  She agreed that I should try and get the job at the other company.  She said that I should look at the current job as a rebound relationship and that this was bound to happen since I was in one place for so many years.  She said many people don't know they don't want something until they're in the situation and it suddenly dawns on them that it's all wrong or not the right fit, or whatever.  She also said she thinks the reason I picked this job is that it's the "safe" choice, and that's what I always did before surgery.  She then said it's a new me and I need to spread my wings and stop always trying to be safe.  After all this I thought about it and realized she's right.  I also realized that I didn't think through the decision between the two jobs.  I said yes on the spot when Company B called me, and that's not like me not to think things through.  
 
So, where it sits now is that I've emailed the CEO of Company A to say I'm interested and why (not "I made a mistake", but "here's why I want the job") and asked if the job is still available.  I haven't heard anything yet.  I only hope he still wants me; I turned him down twice already.  Now that I've emailed him I feel at peace.  For now I'll keep plugging along at the current job.  It's not terrible.  I know what I'm doing, I work a straight 40 hours and I'm stress-free.  I can deal for now.
 
One thing I want to say is that I actually don't feel emotional or hormonal in any way after surgery.  I feel just like I did beforehand.  The psychologist agreed that I don't seem to have any deeper issues going on in regards to the WLS, which I'm really thankful for.

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