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Cameron

Exactly Why Cant We Have Carbonated Drinks?

23 posts in this topic

I was wondering exactly why cant we have carbonated drinks?! I am almost 8months out and have been craving diet coke soo bad. I am sick of flavored water and diet powerade to the point im begining to hate it. I know diet drinks are bad for you etc but i just want to know why it

specifically bad for RNY patients!

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I think it's because it might stretch your pouch or something. And prolly cause alot of carbonated stuff like soda has alot of sugar and caffiene in it. Although, I had a beer on New year's eve without any problems. You'd prolly have to ask your doctor to know for sure.

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Somebody on here once said that their doctor said, not all his patients who gained weight back after surgery went back to drinking pop or diet pop, but all his patients who went back to drinking pop or even diet pop gained back weight. To me it is not worth the risk.

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The carbonation can stretch your pouch...definitely not worth it!

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My NUT and doc said that carbonation stretched the pouch and puts pressure on the staple line. You've gone this long without it, you can do it!

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I'm just not even gonna go there. The surgery is something I wanted and knew that soda was something i would have to give up. I didn't drink much soda to begin with, but every now and then I still have a temptation for an orange crush. Not worth it. SO not worth it. I NEVER want to go back to being as big as I was again. I was miserable, and it's just not worth it for a soda.

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I was in a situation once where the only drink option was soda. I decided to take a diet soda to "fit in." I took a drink and it hurt. I mean hurt a llllll the way down. One of my mom's friends had RNY many years ago, and she drinks them regularly...and takes Flintstone vitamins...and eats Snicker bars....and does not exercise. I can see how one thing could lead to another.

Edited by KimmyToo
cinwa likes this

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If your doctor has told you not to drink them then don't do it. I haven't had a soda in over 2 years....Do I crave it, yes but do I give in...Uh, heck no because I don't ever want to be 240 pounds again.

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Somebody on here once said that their doctor said, not all his patients who gained weight back after surgery went back to drinking pop or diet pop, but all his patients who went back to drinking pop or even diet pop gained back weight. To me it is not worth the risk.

That's exactly what my doctor said to me. Although my doctor said I could have anything I wanted in moderation, including carbonated drinks, but he strongly suggested they be along the lines of selzter

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ive never been a soda person. but at new years i was loving the champagne...and didnt have any issue other than gas going one way or the other.....certainly not something i would do regularly but not harmful

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I was in a situation once where the only drink option was soda. I decided to take a diet soda to "fit in." I took a drink and it hurt. I mean hurt a llllll the way down. One of my mom's friends had RNY many years ago, and she drinks them regularly...and takes Flintstone vitamins...and eats Snicker bars....and does not exercise. I can see how one thing could lead to another.

Yes and yes!

In all the post-op paperwork that I have been given, nowhere does it say "DO NOT"; it says avoid. I've avoided carbonated beverages and have only had a sip or two of sparkling water when there really wasn't anything else (not a big fan of tap water). It doesn't feel right. I don't want to say it was agonizing pain, but it just didn't feel right.

On New Years I had two sips of champagne...two! I felt like I was a huge ball of gas and couldn't stop burping for a full 5 minutes. I'm not one to enjoy belching in front of people, so I've decided that might be the last time I'm going to indulge on the bubbly.

I gave up diet soda almost a year before surgery, but it's the sparkling water I crave. I usually open a bottle in the morning and let it go flat. Even after hours of sitting, some bubbles are still in there and I swear I can feel them going down. Is it worth the discomfort? Not for me.

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I drink diet soda. I have one a day. The research abut if carbonation stretches your pouch is varied. There is no hard evidence, it is thought that you swallow air with every drink and it is expelled he same way that carbonation would be. At first it is important to not have the carbonation because of the pressure it may put on the staple line. My doctor said that after the stomach is healed the main reason to avoid carbonation is becasue carbonation drinks are typically soda is shown to be a gateway to craving other sweets. I do not have a sweet tooth and soda isn't a gateway for me.

You will not hurt yourself by drinking soda, and if you can keep it from you craving other sweets then go ahead.

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The others have said it: stretching the pouch is the foremost reason not to drink carbonated beverages. Even if you shake them up to fizz the bubbles out and flatten them, once they warm up inside the body, more carbonation will come out. Another reason not to is intestinal gas from the carbonation. Another reason, which may or may not apply to WLS, is that Coke and other soft drinks like that have a meat tenderizing effect. If you soak a piece of beef in Coke you'll see what I mean. It's almost like it digests it. Ick. Then there's caffeine, sugar, and the diet soda syndrome, where many people gain weight despite drinking the diet version. Some day it's because they then feel entitled to a few extra food calories, others say it's because of some hormonal and digestive response to the artificial sweeteners. I dunno.

For me, I think water will be the single best choice and I'm going to make that at least 80% of my intake. Crystal Light and herbal teas, or decaffeinated black tea are a second alternative and would take up the other 20%.

Edited by mussakka

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First, I have never been a soda drinker. But I have been interested in the reasoning being us being encouraged not to consume carbonated drinks.

I can understand that the carbonation may cause discomfort but it's difficult to understand how the carbonation can stretch the pouch any more than plain liquids ot foods.

I asked one of my docs why we are told to avoid soda - even sugar free - and he was honest enough to tell me that he didn't really know.

This is Dr. Callery's response to a similar question:

chrystalpelton, on 24 March 2011 - 03:41 PM, said:

Hi doctor Ive asked this question several times...but noone really knows the answer...I hope you can explain it to me....I know we are not suppose to have soda....for obvious reasons...and Im not a soda drinker.... but my vice is carbonated water....it has nothing in it calories, anything but its carbonated...are we allowed to have this? Im almost 8 weeks out

Great question! The conventional wisdom is that carbonated beverages should be avoided after gastric bypass and vertical sleeve gastrectomy. Reasons stated include potential stretching of the pouch or sleeve and uncomfortable bloating caused by the expanding gas. These reasons make common sense, but to the best of my knowledge have never been tested in an objective manner. I suppose one would have to have half of a randomized group drink sodas for five or ten years and the other not. So you can see that that's just not going to happen. The question "do sodas stretch the pouch" will remain unanswered.

Another reason that surgeons advise against sodas is the possibility that drinking calorie free sodas will pave the way to drinking sugary sodas. Again, I don't know if that's likely or not, but drinking sugar sodas is the kiss of death to successful weight loss maintenance after bariatric surgery.

Really drinking any calorie containing beverages including juice bar drinks, vegetable juice, sodas, sports drinks, kids sugar drinks, ice tea containing sugar, coffee with milk, and beer will lead to intake than more calories than needed and weight gain. Now does that mean No Milk, No Juice.....? Well not really. It just means that if you drink liquid calories, you have to figure it into your daily calorie allotment and eat less of other foods. Since many calorie containing liquids have little nourishment other than sugar, that means eating less healthy stuff. A bad trade off. To summarize, if you do drink calorie containing liquids, make sure they are nutritious and include the calories in your daily calorie allotment. If they are of little nutritious value, make them small, occasional, a real treat. So have that glass of orange juice or glass of milk or glass of wine, but remember that they contain about 100 - 120 calories so skip something else and keep your calorie budget intact. Drink your calories responsibly.

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I have been wondering about carbonated beverages after bariatric surgery as well and came across this video on YouTube that makes sense to me. I have never liked either sugar or diet soda drinks but have definitely enjoyed sparkling mineral water. I purchased an electric "milk frother" tool that removes the carbonation from sparkling water causing it to go flat, but honestly without the effervescence the taste is so bad that I would rather not drink it at all. I came across this video that addresses this subject and found it very helpful. It really is a matter of if your body can tolerate the carbonation or not and not that it will stretch out your pouch or cause any damage.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z5nm1GXqrm4

Edited by Libbety

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I couldn't handle carbonation for a couple of years, felt like I'd explode. I stopped drinking soft drinks before WLS, and discovered I can tolerate a beer with dinner last summer. I might eat at a restaurant twice a year, no more than that.

LeeC likes this

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 After not drinking them for a couple years, I wet my lips with a tiny swallow of my hubby's and could not stand the taste!  To think I used to guzzle Diet Pepsi... I'll do without thank you.  

tmcgee likes this

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As most things go -  the more you do it, the easier it gets.  I started drinking sparkling water (calorie free carb free) because it filled me up fast, which discouraged wanting/being able to eat.  A couple drinks and whala - full stomach.  But as time progressed those 2 'gulps' took 4 'gulps' to feel the same full sensation and 4 to 6 and etc etc etc and at this point I basically can drink a bottle of sparkling water as if there was never any carbonation in it.

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At best I had one diet soda a week in the past, haven't missed it at all since two weeks before surgery (1/26).  Don't plan on going back to drinking them. I am looking forward to getting the okay to drink coffee, 1 plain skinny latte - I miss that.  What's important to me is getting the fat gone and staying healthy for the next 20 years (I'm 61). Anything that will lead to bad food behavior I'm avoiding.

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I don't believe carbonated beverages stretch the pouch any more than any other beverage or food. Why would it? I also don't believe that drinking diet soda leads to drinking regular/non-dietetic  soda. That reasoning is similar to smoking weed leads to heroin use. What I CAN tell you, is at least for me, drinking dietetic beverages, specifically Diet Coke, leads me to crave carbs and ultimately lose weight slower, AND retain sodium. I read once that not everyone who gains weight drinks soda, but most people who drink soda gain weight, and I am guilty as charged. It's really addictive too. If you haven't done it, then keep away.

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Early on, carbonation hurt my sleeve. About a month ago I drank about 4 ounces of diet coke and it was okay. The thing I fear is that if I start on diet coke again, I will start eating or craving the things that got me fat.

 

Raeme likes this

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This is an interesting topic to me. I rarely drank soda of any kind for years and was at a healthy weight. When I did drink a soda it was regular and never diet because I hated the chemical taste of the diet.  I loved tonic water and lime and often drank that at night or when we went out instead of alcohol. Again healthy weight and healthy eating. 

After I had children I wanted to lose weight and started drinking Diet Coke. Over about 5-6 years I gained a lot of weight. I was drinking 4-5 a day sometimes.  I think I craved food a lot more from the chemicals and caffeine??  I tried for two years to lose on ww and dc was my special friend.  I ate really healthy but couldn't lose more than 12-16 pounds total over 7-8 month time period. 

I know only one person who drinks diet soda who isn't heavy and she only drinks it when she's teaching a class two days a week. Otherwise she's drinking infused waters.  Now I'm totally off Diet Coke and I don't want to even take a sip of it. I feel good where I am and don't ever plan to drink it regularly so no loss.  But I wonder if all things were equal would there be a difference in those who followed the same plan with Diet Coke and those who didn't drink it. Thought provoking.  I would like some tonic and lime maybe eventually a sip or two if the surgeon says ok.  

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I sympathize. Soda was my ADDICTION before surgery. I stopped a few months before, and have not had any in months, but BOY do I miss it! People kept telling me that eventually I wouldn't want it anymore and it would taste nasty if I DID have it. Well, I sneaked a tiny sip of my friend's strawberry pop and it was like heaven! LOL  I know it is a trigger for me and I KNOW I can't do it, but sometimes I just want to whine about it! ;)

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