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Low hemoglobin


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#1 martha101452

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  • Surgery Date:03/08/2011
  • Surgery Type:Gastric Bypass

Posted 20 April 2011 - 09:07 AM

I went back for my 6 week checkup with the surgeon yesterday. They told me my hemoglobin was low but it was not due to iron. They said my iron level was excellent. I was scheduled for a colonoscopy. Colonoscopy only looks at the large intestines up to the end of the small intestines. I would think they would be looking at my stomach and small intestines. Anyway I have a colonoscopy scheduled in a week.

Anybody else had this problem. It would be find if my iron was low then it would be iron deficiency anemia. All oif my vitamins level were excellent.

#2 whiskeylullaby

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Posted 20 April 2011 - 09:35 AM

I went back for my 6 week checkup with the surgeon yesterday. They told me my hemoglobin was low but it was not due to iron. They said my iron level was excellent. I was scheduled for a colonoscopy. Colonoscopy only looks at the large intestines up to the end of the small intestines. I would think they would be looking at my stomach and small intestines. Anyway I have a colonoscopy scheduled in a week.

Anybody else had this problem. It would be find if my iron was low then it would be iron deficiency anemia. All oif my vitamins level were excellent.


Not all anemia is caused by iron. It could be just that your blood is low "overall". I had an upper and lower scope before the surgery. The lower one could be them looking for anything that could cause blood loss, or cysts, or even any abnormalities. When you have anemia, a lot of the time, it relates to something with the colon.
Scopes can't see into the small intestine. The hardware they use can only "reach" so far in, so they see what they can.
All the best!
~*~ Working towards a better me ~*~

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#3 cinwa

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Posted 20 April 2011 - 10:38 AM

Martha - our own Dr. Callery has some information here on T-T: http://www.thinnerti...deficiency.html

Are vitamin B12 and folate deficiency clinically important after roux-en-Y gastric bypass?

Brolin RE, Gorman JH, Gorman RC, Petschenik AJ, Bradley LJ, Kenler HA, Cody RP
Although iron, vitamin B12, and folate deficiency have been well documented after gastric bypass operations performed for morbid obesity, there is surprisingly little information on either the natural course or the treatment of these deficiencies in Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) patients. During a 10-year period, a complete blood count and serum levels of iron, total iron-binding capacity, vitamin B12, and folate were obtained in 348 patients preoperatively and postoperatively at 6-month intervals for the first 2 years, then annually thereafter. The principal objectives of this study were to determine how readily patients who developed metabolic deficiencies after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass responded to postoperative supplements of the deficient micronutrient and to learn whether the risk of developing these deficiencies decreases over time. Hemoglobin and hematocrit levels were significantly decreased at all postoperative intervals in comparison to preoperative values. Moreover, at each successive interval through 5 years, hemoglobin and hematocrit were decreased significantly compared to the preceding interval. Folate levels were significantly increased compared to preoperative levels at all time intervals. Iron and vitamin B12 levels were lower than preoperative measurements and remained relatively stable postoperatively. Half of the low hemoglobin levels were not associated with iron deficiency. Taking multivitamin supplements resulted in a lower incidence of folate deficiency but did not prevent iron or vitamin B12 deficiency. Oral supplementation of iron and vitamin B12 corrected deficiencies in 43% and 81% of cases, respectively. Folate deficiency was almost always corrected with multivitamins alone. No patient had symptoms that could be attributed to either vitamin B12 or folate deficiency Conversely, many patients had symptoms of iron deficiency and anemia. Lack of symptoms of vitamin B12 and folate deficiency suggests that these deficiencies are not clinically important after RYGB. Conversely, iron deficiency and anemia are potentially serious problems after RYGB, particularly in younger women. Hence we recommend prophylactic oral iron supplements to premenopausal women who undergo RYGB.


My hemoglobin level was a little on the low side early post-op. The nurse told me it could be related to not enough protein (not unusual in the early weeks post-op).

9/24/07 - Lap. - RNY with umbilical hernia repair

10/27/08 - Open - removal of omental mass, gallbladder, appendix, adhesions

11/12/10 - Open - bilateral femoral hernia repair


"Many of life's failures are people who did not realize

how close they were to success when they gave up".

 

~*♥*~ Thomas Edison ~*♥*~

 


#4 martha101452

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  • Height (ft-in):5-04
  • Start Weight:225
  • Current Weight:113
  • Goal Weight:130
  • Body Mass Index (BMI):20.6
  • Surgery Date:03/08/2011
  • Surgery Type:Gastric Bypass

Posted 20 April 2011 - 10:48 AM

They tested my protein with all the other vitamins and lab work done. They said it was excellent. I always had a rather high hemoglobin. I am just worried that it may be something related to the surgery. I have had stomach ulcers in the past. You get this nawing pain that feels a littlel like hunger pain. I have been taking my prolosec and take Maalox occasionally.

#5 cinwa

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Posted 20 April 2011 - 12:47 PM

It's standard practice to perform a colonoscopy to rule out lower intestinal sources of bleeding which can be the cause of a lower hemoglobin level. They'll be looking for things like symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis, diverticulitis, irritable bowel, etc. etc.

And it's recommended we start having colonoscopies after 50 anyway.

9/24/07 - Lap. - RNY with umbilical hernia repair

10/27/08 - Open - removal of omental mass, gallbladder, appendix, adhesions

11/12/10 - Open - bilateral femoral hernia repair


"Many of life's failures are people who did not realize

how close they were to success when they gave up".

 

~*♥*~ Thomas Edison ~*♥*~

 


#6 gnaed

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Posted 21 April 2011 - 03:06 AM

It's standard practice to perform a colonoscopy to rule out lower intestinal sources of bleeding which can be the cause of a lower hemoglobin level. They'll be looking for things like symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis, diverticulitis, irritable bowel, etc. etc.

And it's recommended we start having colonoscopies after 50 anyway.


I know colonoscopies are no fun, but if there's ANY history of colon cancer in your family, I wouldn't wait until I was 50. My husband was 34 when he was diagnosed with colon cancer (and he's still alive and well at 50). I assume they're looking to see if you have unexplained blood loss because of something not necessarily gastric bypass related.

I'm glad they're not just assuming that everything is WLS related. I suspect a lot of things could get overlooked that way because we all tend to focus on that now.

Let us know how it, um, all works out.
~Karen~

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Weight:
247/210/135/129 = highest (11/25/10)/surgery (2/14/11)/Today/goal


Goals:
Under 200 / Halfway mark / 189 / 179 / 169 / 159 / 149 / 147 (100lbs.) / 141 (Normal) / 139 / 135
[size=6
Size [s]24 22 20 18 16 14[/s] 12 10
8[/size] [size=4]6

#7 cinwa

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  • Surgery Date:09/24/2007
  • Surgery Type:Gastric Bypass

Posted 21 April 2011 - 04:43 AM

I know colonoscopies are no fun, but if there's ANY history of colon cancer in your family, I wouldn't wait until I was 50. My husband was 34 when he was diagnosed with colon cancer (and he's still alive and well at 50). I assume they're looking to see if you have unexplained blood loss because of something not necessarily gastric bypass related.

I'm glad they're not just assuming that everything is WLS related. I suspect a lot of things could get overlooked that way because we all tend to focus on that now.

Let us know how it, um, all works out.


You are so right Karen.

There are two forms of hereditary colon cancer - Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) and Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) - both can be detected with genetic testing:

Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP)
Colon cancer develops at an extremely young age (20 to 45)
Virtually one hundred percent chance of developing colon cancer by age 45 (unless the colon has been surgically removed)
Hundreds or even thousands of polyps in the colon

Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC)
Increased lifetime risk of developing colon cancer (as high as 80 percent, compared with 5 percent in the general population)
Earlier cancer development compared to sporadic cancers, though not as early as in FAP. (In HNPCC patients, cancer often occurs around age 44, compared with age 64 in sporadic colon cancer, and age 39 in FAP)
Increased risk for cancer of the uterus as well as several other types of cancer


9/24/07 - Lap. - RNY with umbilical hernia repair

10/27/08 - Open - removal of omental mass, gallbladder, appendix, adhesions

11/12/10 - Open - bilateral femoral hernia repair


"Many of life's failures are people who did not realize

how close they were to success when they gave up".

 

~*♥*~ Thomas Edison ~*♥*~