chrystalpelton

carbonated drinks after gastric bypass and vertical sleeve gastrectomy

5 posts in this topic

Hi doctor Ive asked this question several times...but noone really knows the answer...I hope you can explain it to me....I know we are not suppose to have soda....for obvious reasons...and Im not a soda drinker.... but my vice is carbonated water....it has nothing in it calories, anything but its carbonated...are we allowed to have this? Im almost 8 weeks out

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Hi doctor Ive asked this question several times...but noone really knows the answer...I hope you can explain it to me....I know we are not suppose to have soda....for obvious reasons...and Im not a soda drinker.... but my vice is carbonated water....it has nothing in it calories, anything but its carbonated...are we allowed to have this? Im almost 8 weeks out

Great question! The conventional wisdom is that carbonated beverages should be avoided after gastric bypass and vertical sleeve gastrectomy. Reasons stated include potential stretching of the pouch or sleeve and uncomfortable bloating caused by the expanding gas. These reasons make common sense, but to the best of my knowledge have never been tested in an objective manner. I suppose one would have to have half of a randomized group drink sodas for five or ten years and the other not. So you can see that that's just not going to happen. The question "do sodas stretch the pouch" will remain unanswered.

Another reason that surgeons advise against sodas is the possibility that drinking calorie free sodas will pave the way to drinking sugary sodas. Again, I don't know if that's likely or not, but drinking sugar sodas is the kiss of death to successful weight loss maintenance after bariatric surgery.

Really drinking any calorie containing beverages including juice bar drinks, vegetable juice, sodas, sports drinks, kids sugar drinks, ice tea containing sugar, coffee with milk, and beer will lead to intake than more calories than needed and weight gain. Now does that mean No Milk, No Juice.....? Well not really. It just means that if you drink liquid calories, you have to figure it into your daily calorie allotment and eat less of other foods. Since many calorie containing liquids have little nourishment other than sugar, that means eating less healthy stuff. A bad trade off. To summarize, if you do drink calorie containing liquids, make sure they are nutritious and include the calories in your daily calorie allotment. If they are of little nutritious value, make them small, occasional, a real treat. So have that glass of orange juice or glass of milk or glass of wine, but remember that they contain about 100 - 120 calories so skip something else and keep your calorie budget intact. Drink your calories responsibly. :)

ardita, John and BonnieRose like this

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Great question! The conventional wisdom is that carbonated beverages should be avoided after gastric bypass and vertical sleeve gastrectomy. Reasons stated include potential stretching of the pouch or sleeve and uncomfortable bloating caused by the expanding gas. These reasons make common sense, but to the best of my knowledge have never been tested in an objective manner. I suppose one would have to have half of a randomized group drink sodas for five or ten years and the other not. So you can see that that's just not going to happen. The question "do sodas stretch the pouch" will remain unanswered.

Another reason that surgeons advise against sodas is the possibility that drinking calorie free sodas will pave the way to drinking sugary sodas. Again, I don't know if that's likely or not, but drinking sugar sodas is the kiss of death to successful weigh loss maintenance after bariatric surgery.

Really drinking any calorie containing beverages including juice bar drinks, vegetable juice, sodas, sports drinks, kids sugar drinks, ice tea containing sugar, coffee with milk, and beer will lead to intake than more calories than needed and weight gain. Now does that mean No Milk, No Juice.....? Well not really. It just means that if you drink liquid calories, you have to figure it into your daily calorie allotment and eat less of other foods. Since many calorie containing liquids have little nourishment other than sugar, that means eating less healthy stuff. A bad trade off. To summarize, if you do drink calorie containing liquids, make sure they are nutritious and include the calories in your daily calorie allotment. If they are of little nutritious value, make them small, occasional, a real treat. So have that glass of orange juice or glass of milk or glass of wine, but remember that they contain about 100 - 120 calories so skip something else and keep your calorie budget intact. Drink your calories responsibly. :)

Excellent advice Dr. C. I think you hit the nail on the head. Calories count. Count your calories. Thanks for question and the advice. :)

ardita likes this

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I was a really big diet soda drinker before my surgery. I gave it up for good when I started my pre-op diet and I would venture to guess that giving up soda (yes, even diet soda) has contributed to my significant weight loss in the past 9 months (over 120 pounds!).

I did attempt to try a very small amount when I was a few months post op and was immedietly hit by sharp sharp pain. Totally not worth it.

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Great question! The conventional wisdom is that carbonated beverages should be avoided after gastric bypass and vertical sleeve gastrectomy. Reasons stated include potential stretching of the pouch or sleeve and uncomfortable bloating caused by the expanding gas. These reasons make common sense, but to the best of my knowledge have never been tested in an objective manner. I suppose one would have to have half of a randomized group drink sodas for five or ten years and the other not. So you can see that that's just not going to happen. The question "do sodas stretch the pouch" will remain unanswered.

Another reason that surgeons advise against sodas is the possibility that drinking calorie free sodas will pave the way to drinking sugary sodas. Again, I don't know if that's likely or not, but drinking sugar sodas is the kiss of death to successful weigh loss maintenance after bariatric surgery.

Really drinking any calorie containing beverages including juice bar drinks, vegetable juice, sodas, sports drinks, kids sugar drinks, ice tea containing sugar, coffee with milk, and beer will lead to intake than more calories than needed and weight gain. Now does that mean No Milk, No Juice.....? Well not really. It just means that if you drink liquid calories, you have to figure it into your daily calorie allotment and eat less of other foods. Since many calorie containing liquids have little nourishment other than sugar, that means eating less healthy stuff. A bad trade off. To summarize, if you do drink calorie containing liquids, make sure they are nutritious and include the calories in your daily calorie allotment. If they are of little nutritious value, make them small, occasional, a real treat. So have that glass of orange juice or glass of milk or glass of wine, but remember that they contain about 100 - 120 calories so skip something else and keep your calorie budget intact. Drink your calories responsibly. :)

I make my morning (decaf) tea count by using vanilla protein powder mixed with milk to make a morning tea latte. Although there is calories, I get almost 20 grams of protein in my 16 oz tea without pain!

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