HarperLee

Diabetes and WLS

16 posts in this topic

Hey all - I am wondering if anyone out there has had the surgery and not gotten rid of Type II diabetes? I read a study that says only 80% or so end up having diabetes resolved. What has everyone experienced? I would SO LOVE to have mine resolve.

Thanks!!

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Mine got worse instead of better, at first.. I thought for sure I would be one of that 20% for whom the surgery didn't help. My numbers shot up over 400 the day I had surgery and they ended up putting me on both slow and fast acting insulin and I was sent home having to give shots whereas prior to surgery I managed with oral meds only. To say I was devestated is an understatement.. but I sucked it up, learned to give the shots and did what I was told to get off the meds.

It took me about 3 months in total to be weaned off all the medications but I was finally able to drop all the insulin, plus the blood pressure and cholesterol medications. My last A1c was 5.2 which is slightly higher than it's been in the past.. my low post op was 4.8.. Not sure what has changed to make it rise but as long as it stays in the normal range I'm happy.

You won't know until you're through the surgery and living life post op whether you'll be one that it is completely resolved but even if not resolved fully, I would think your numbers would have to improve significantly!

Good luck!

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I was off the insulin within a couple of months, but needed to take Metformin for an additional 4 or 5 months after coming off of the insulin.

It may take some time, but it's so worth it.

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I was off my glyburide and my metformin dose was cut in half the day I left the hospital after surgery. About 2 weeks ago I was taken completely off metformin and also all my blood pressure medicines as well. :)

Diabetes was THE reason I opted for gastric bypass verses the lapband. I originally wanted the band but upon my consultation with my surgeon he convinced me that bypass was more ideal for me for my health reasons and boy was he right!

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I was taking Metformin HCL 500 mg twice a day-5 days after surgery-I was off the medicine. My sugar readings first thing in the morning are in the 104 range. Life is good for me. (FYI-metformin tabs crushed taste real bad :eek:)

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Hi, 80% hey, I didn't know the stats. I had a VSG and within 5 days there was no sign of diabetes - GONE! That was my first WOW moment, I'd gone in pre-op, taking 850mg metformin 3 times a day, 20 units of 24hr insulin and 10units of insulin 3 times a day. I left instructed that I no longer needed treatment for diabetes. All this dispite being told by the surgeon prior to surgery that there was little chance that my diabetes would go as I'd had it for around 12 years.

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The morning of surgery my BG was 270 or something like that, this morning its was 109:D:D:D:D. I have not taken any diabetes meds since I left the hospital on Friday.

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Thanks everyone for your stories. I am just so hoping I can come off the metformin and lantus. You all have given me hope!

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One of the motivations for my surgery was Diabetes 2 and getting it under control before it ravaged my organs, killing me. I told this to my surgeon on first interview, and he said that about 95% diabetic patients are cured of their Diabetes 2 and off all medication. He went on to inform me that the medical community has yet to understand exactly how the body metabolizes differently after GBS but once it does he may very well be performing GBS as a recognized cure for Diabetes 2. For me it worked! Off came the weight and away went the diabetes and goodbye needles and pills. The minimal damage to nerves in both my feet however was irreversible but not painful or obstructive to my life.

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One thing I encourage everyone to do is to keep monitoring your blood sugars.. my doctor stresses that we are not 'cured' but we are in remission and it could return if we're not vigilant.

I still check my numbers every so often to make sure I'm still in good range. (I actually go hypo more often than not) and we'll need to make sure we get our a1c checked as well. It's kind of a pain but necessary, IMHO.

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Very true, I still check mine a couple of days a week in the morning just to be sure.

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My last dose of Metformin was in the hospital after RYN surgery, I have not taken any since. I was on 1,000 mg a day, heading toward insuling again (had gestational with my second child who is now 8). My last A1C test my numbers were 5.2, prior to surgery it was in the low teens. I also check my blood a couple times a week, my last am reading was 92.

Good luck to you, I hope surgery is as sucessful for you as it has been for me.

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As a Canadian not sure on the conversions but I check periodically and am usually normal 4.5 - 7.0. This a.m. was 6.7 Your right doesn't hurt to check from time to time, especially when I am feeling either tired or not well for unknown reason(s). A lot of times it is not diabetes, it is I am either just tired or fighting off a cold or something (tends to hit me harder these days), or the odd time it is starting to go hypo (rare).

To those it does not help (GBS) go into remission, all I can say is I feel for you!

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I had the surgery for my diabetes, as well. At 44, I was pretty advanced. I used to take two oral meds, as well as Humalog and Lantus, about 5-6 shots daily. Even with those, my numbers were bad! My pre-op A1C was 8.9. (I know....not good)

I did not immediately go off all meds but, pretty quickly. I then had occasional bouts with low blood sugars which was scary. I never experienced that before. It was sometimes a result of having sweets and then my body over corrected. (yes, I'm one that does not get sick on sugar) I've also had that reaction from exercise but, only once or twice.

I not longer take any diabetes meds. About ten months after surgery, my A1C was 6.3 with no meds at all. That was a big turn around!

Am I still a diabetic? I like to tell people that I'm a "recovering diabetic". :D The truth is that I think I will always need to be aware of this problem. I sometimes still react like a diabetic. For example, I recently took a medicine that elevated my blood sugars quite a bit! I need to be very aware that I still have the tendency toward diabetes and weight gain would probably put me back on medication at some point. This is a motivator, though!

Was the surgery worth it? ABSOLUTELY! I would definitely make the same choice if I had to do it all over again. For me, the dangers of being diabetic (and an out of control diabetic, especially) made the surgery so worth it. I believe I've added years to my life. I suffer from neuropathy in my feet so I'm reminded every day of my past and possible future if I don't keep my weight under control. WLS surgery made this possible. It's very, very hard to lose weight when you take large doses of insulin and that's where I used to be.

Edited by Linda in MN

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Hi Harper! Great post!

I'm in the same boat. Hoping that WLS will help with my diabetes symptoms (not fully diabetic yet but very, very close - pre-diabetic - even though there really isn't such a thing...)

I can't wait to feel better! And hey, 80% is a pretty darn good success rate, if you ask me.

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Just wanted to pipe in on this subject of the diabetes. I do believe that most of the 20% are those that have type 1 diabetes or those that have diabetes from other things than poor diet and excercise habits like that of type 2 diabetes.

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