Sharksgrl99

When did you truly start seeing weight loss regularly post op?

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Posted (edited)

Question - for those that had RNY, when did you really start seeing the weight loss?

I've been stalled since day 9 Day 6 (-12lbs) and on day 15 now. I'm getting in all my protein and water, vitamins, started adding soft veggies, carbs under 20 every day, (yes I'm having BMs), I walk multiple times a day, along with doing regular household stuff, errands, etc. Yes, I'm more than happy with the 12 lb loss so far and i have lost a couple inches overall.

I know there's typically a stall in the beginning after surgery as the body adjusts. I'm not getting discouraged at all. I have faith. I have been a daily weigher for 40+ years so that's not going to change. I'm just more interested in the process and when most started to see it move more post op.

From your experience, when did YOU truly start seeing the loss? A month out? 2 months? Is there anything I can do to help it?

 

Edited by Sharksgrl99
corrected day

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It took me months and months before I could see a slimmer me in front of the mirror but I knew from my clothes that I had lost weight from about the 12 week post-op mark and that's because my clothes were literally hanging off me - my work pants especially.  I had lost about 31 lb since surgery.

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I had probably lost about 35lb before I really saw it, and that was pre-surgery. It makes sense that the heavier your starting weight the more lbs need to drop before they'll be noticeable either to yourself or to others. These days I see a difference with just a few lbs lost, but I believe I'm now skating that thin line where any more loss might be too much.

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My first month was slow relative to many others - I lost 15 pounds, I think (it's in my signature line so you can see it). My second month was slower - only 10 or 11. By that time, I could sort of see it, but not that much. By three months out, it was more apparent to me, and I was *feeling* thinner. By four months out, I felt pretty great about my losses, and was starting to buy much better fitting clothes. 

Funny, at the time that seemed to take  F O R  E  V  E   R, but reading it like I just wrote it, it was obviously very quick. Actually, thanks for making me look at it that way!

My blog posts early out are full of me fretting about losing slowly- they might make you feel less alone if you like that kind of thing. They're over on the blog page.

Best of luck - it's going to be exciting!!

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I started to really "see" my weight loss about 2-3 months after my surgery. 

To put that in context,I began at 304 pounds.  :o

In the two months prior to my surgery I lost 20 pounds to be at 284 pounds.

After my RNY gastric bypass surgery in November 2013, my monthly weight loss rates were as follows:

1.  23 pounds

2.  16 pounds

3.  16 pounds

4.  12 pounds

5.  18 pounds

6.  7 pounds

7.  7 pounds

8.  2 pounds

9.  0 pounds

10. 4 pounds

11. 2 pounds - at which point (in mid-October 2014) I reached 177 pounds.  This is just below my current goal weight.

Thus, I lost 127 pounds in all - 20 pounds before surgery and 107 pounds after surgery.

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Thank you guys. I went back over everything and I was actually at day 6 when I started stalling. I'm out 3 weeks today and still at the -12. It moves up and down 1 lb but nothing else. 

Thank you @Res Ipsa, I'm right where you started as well at 308 (surgery weigh in). Of course I just keep thinking "i'm the one person that the surgery didn't work for". You would think being heavier it would melt off initially.

@Jen581791 I love that you have each month in your signature line. It truly helps in seeing someone's reality bit by bit.

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I lost about 25 lbs the first month. Ridiculously, I thought "that's it?". I thought that the weight would magically fall off and I would be a swimsuit model overnight. I had some delusional thinking some of which I attribute to my post op emotional state. I also thought that RNY had failed me.

At one month out, even though I didn't see it, I knew I had lost weight because my shorts fell off in a Target parking lot. Hand to God, that story is true. Despite physical proof, I didn't see any changes in my face and I was disappointed. My parents, who took care of me for a month, didn't see any big changes in my face or body. Boom! Another disappointment. As the months went by, i started losing, gaining and stalling in small increments. Five months later and I am 61 lbs down. 

I didn't *see* the change until about three weeks ago. It took me four months to see that while I am not a swimsuit model, I am much slimmer and healthier. one day, I looked on the mirror and legitimately did not recognize the person looking back at me. 

We each have our own journey and our bodies lose weight at different rates. Just look at @Trish1967's posts to see how she is triumphing over some major health concerns, while losing weight. 

I wish you well. I hope this is helpful and if I can be of any additional help, just ask. 

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I lost 22 pounds the month before surgery. Then by month: 16 pounds, 10 pounds, 12 pounds, 10 pounds, 10 pounds; last two months: around 5 pounds in total. I had stalls which stressed me at the time but looking back the trend was ineluctably downwards. I started noticing changes about month 3 - at month 8 everyone notices it.

To some extent, in the first year much of the weight loss follows its own momentum.

Things to do to help weight loss, based on my experience:

i) don't worry about stalls (I am a daily weigher too); you have a magic tool that will get you effortlessly over stalls (but only for the first year or so);

ii) build good habits. For me, this was high protein, low carb, intermittent fasting, walking one hour, hydration, vitamins/minerals and dental care;

iii) eat really delicious, high quality food (for me, salmon, 85% chocolate, French cheese) and do exercise you love (for me, walking with podcasts)

iv) don't make unsustainable changes (I still occasionally eat mouthfuls of cake, drink glass or so of alcohol and sparkling water daily)

v) it seems that too much exercise slows weight loss? consider not hitting the gym and walking instead

vi) avoid the pitfalls of WLS failure: grazing, slider foods, sodas

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Is it wrong of me to think something is wrong? I don't think I'm being impatient, I guess I was just expecting something "different". 

I've still been stalled and now I've even been gaining...gaining! Now I've technically only lost 8 lbs since surgery in 3-1/2 weeks and back up to 300.  How in the world can you gain eating less than 700 calories a day??? (and yes I'm having BMs)

I actually sent all my food logs to our dietician and he said it all looked good.I'm  I was going by what he told us in the classes and on the handouts for that day, for stage 3 soft foods, 500-700 calories and 85g protein, getting in about 64oz water a day, light walking. He said his only suggestion was to make sure protein and calories were evenly distributed through over all 3 meals (3 meals/no snacks). How in the world do you do that if only allowed 1 shake. If i want eggs, they only have 6g protein per egg and I'd have to have 4.7 to get 28.34g protein for 1 meal. That is not happening 3-1/2 weeks out, I can barely eat 1. Let alone get in 200 calories average per meal. 

Oh GET THIS!! Then in the same conversation, he says, just go by the sample menus in the book. The book/binder they gave us at the orientation had 2 sample days. I added them up and they are only 40g protein a day and 400 calories for Stage 3 Soft Foods. 

Now I'm seriously even more confused, stalled, upset I can't get this moving. Isn't RNY suppose to give you more weight loss? I lost more on pre-op. 

(can't stop crying over this)

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Aw, @Sharksgrl99, I'm so sorry this is getting you down. You're doing all the right things and, when you do all the right things, you have success (in your body's own time). You are so early out. I'm not at all surprised your body is prioritizing healing over weight loss. While I think sending your menus to the dietician was an excellent idea, don't let his advice make you crazy (Sometimes their advice doesn't all add up). If there are carbs you can cut out of your diet, do it. I only weigh once a week, and it is one of the keys to my happiness. Truly. The weight loss will happen. You'll look back and get a kick out of your old posts like this. And you'll reassure the next despairing post-op that success will happen for those who follow the plan.

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I truly know it is hard to *feel* that it's happening, but it is. It takes a while to add up. When one weighs a lot, losing 20 pounds is not a large percentage, so it feels like it's "not working." It is. It takes some time to show. You're just a few weeks out, and the week three (or thereabouts) stall is a thing. It will get better.

I'm sorry to say that your nut is perhaps not helpful saying you need to balance your protein between meals and at the same time eat three meals only - that's obviously not possible, as you've pointed out. Shakes are a big wallop of protein - hard to get that from anything else. When you can eat meat, that will change a bit, but even then... it would be hard to balance (and why is that helpful, anyway?).

You're doing great at the moment if you're getting in 85g of protein so soon out: keep doing that! Your calories will go up a bit as the weeks go on, and that's great. You will lose a lot of weight doing just what you're doing. You just need time to see it. As @NerdyLady said, if may take you weeks or months before you really see it - it doesn't mean it's not happening, it just means that our brains are powerfully good at maintaining a consistent view of things, despite the raw data coming in our eyeballs.

I know it's hard now. Be patient. In some of my posts and blog entries from March/April of this year, I was going through the same thing. I got over it once my losses started to add up to something more substantial. 

You're doing great! Keep doing what you're doing! You'll be coming on here in three or four months, happy as can be about your amazing losses, sharing NSVs and great stories. 

I cant wait to read those posts :) 

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1 hour ago, Gretta said:

Aw, @Sharksgrl99, I'm so sorry this is getting you down. You're doing all the right things and, when you do all the right things, you have success (in your body's own time). You are so early out. I'm not at all surprised your body is prioritizing healing over weight loss. While I think sending your menus to the dietician was an excellent idea, don't let his advice make you crazy (Sometimes their advice doesn't all add up). If there are carbs you can cut out of your diet, do it. I only weigh once a week, and it is one of the keys to my happiness. Truly. The weight loss will happen. You'll look back and get a kick out of your old posts like this. And you'll reassure the next despairing post-op that success will happen for those who follow the plan.

@Gretta @Jen581791 thank you. As frustrated as I am at all this at this moment and the dietician, your words are comforting. I just keep thinking all this for 8 lbs in a month and nothing else? I can only hope it will start moving again. I'd be happy with another 8 next month if that much.

@Jen581791 in the beginning when you had the same issue, before the losses kicked in, how did you handle it mentally?

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@Sharksgrl99

I'm going to slide in here and steal one of @Res Ipsa 's moves. :D He usually provides this info and it's fantastic. 

I had my initial consultation at Tufts Weight and Wellness Center. They are designated a "Center of Excellence" by BCBS and have done some incredible work. Although I was unable to have my surgery at this hospital, I followed their dietary guidelines to a T. Perhaps you may want to take a look at the meal plan for Bariatric patients? This PDF was my bible in the first few months. https://www.tuftsmedicalcenter.org/~/media/Brochures/TuftsMC/Patient Care Services/Departments and Services/Weight and Wellness Center/GBP Diet Manual12611.ashx

I don't mean to suggest that your medical team doesn't know best. However, finding what is best for you may mean very carefully peeking outside your box. Good luck and keep posting. 

Edited by NerdyLady

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4 hours ago, Jen581791 said:

I truly know it is hard to *feel* that it's happening, but it is. It takes a while to add up. When one weighs a lot, losing 20 pounds is not a large percentage, so it feels like it's "not working." It is. It takes some time to show. You're just a few weeks out, and the week three (or thereabouts) stall is a thing. It will get better.

I'm sorry to say that your nut is perhaps not helpful saying you need to balance your protein between meals and at the same time eat three meals only - that's obviously not possible, as you've pointed out. Shakes are a big wallop of protein - hard to get that from anything else. When you can eat meat, that will change a bit, but even then... it would be hard to balance (and why is that helpful, anyway?).

You're doing great at the moment if you're getting in 85g of protein so soon out: keep doing that! Your calories will go up a bit as the weeks go on, and that's great. You will lose a lot of weight doing just what you're doing. You just need time to see it. As @NerdyLady said, if may take you weeks or months before you really see it - it doesn't mean it's not happening, it just means that our brains are powerfully good at maintaining a consistent view of things, despite the raw data coming in our eyeballs.

I know it's hard now. Be patient. In some of my posts and blog entries from March/April of this year, I was going through the same thing. I got over it once my losses started to add up to something more substantial. 

You're doing great! Keep doing what you're doing! You'll be coming on here in three or four months, happy as can be about your amazing losses, sharing NSVs and great stories. 

I cant wait to read those posts :) 

I think many of us came to this forum sad and hopeless. Trust in your surgery. I know it may sound cliche but every person on this board has their own journey. Some people lose quickly, others lose gradually. Eventually, determined people lose. If you compare yourself to other people, you will drive yourself nuts. You will lose the weight if you stick to your plan. Every one of us has needed this pep talk at one point or another. Like @Jen581791 said, I can't wait to read your posts several months down the line. 

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15 hours ago, Sharksgrl99 said:

in the beginning when you had the same issue, before the losses kicked in, how did you handle it mentally?

Badly? :lol: I weighed myself in the morning and then spent the rest of the day wondering what I was doing wrong: too many carbs? not enough? not enough exercise? the wrong kind? not enough water? not enough protein? too much protein? etc, etc, etc. I just couldn't stop thinking I was doing something wrong, and that I needed to change tactics or something. I didn't, and things just picked up for me, eventually. Well, actually, they just didn't slow down - none of my monthly losses are huge, like those amazing 40 pound losses you read about, but steady -15 or so for a bunch of months in a row is really good and got me in the same place. I stopped feeling desperate to lose faster when I got enough thinner that I was happier feeling about myself (about four months out). It's just a question of trying to be patient while time passes.

Trying to do everything *perfectly* also helped me feel that it was not my fault if I was losing slowly. Protein target: always. Exercise: every day. No junk. No refined carbs. No breaking any of the "rules." That made me feel like I was controlling everything I could, and whatever my body did, it did. I am still mostly *perfect* every day. I'll relax things more when I get closer to goal (well, relax within reason). 

Best of luck making yourself mentally OK with things! If it helps you at all, nearly EVERYONE feels this way in the first few weeks, even people losing 20+ pounds a month! 

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@NerdyLady thank you for that link. I've read it back and forth like 3 times now and saved it. Very informative. 

@Jen581791 thank you for your insight. You seem a lot like me. I think I just need to take a step back and not let it get to me as much right now. We will see how it goes. 

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8 hours ago, Sharksgrl99 said:

I think I just need to take a step back and not let it get to me as much right now. We will see how it goes. 

Easier said than done, but with practice, you may be better able to deal with your losses as more of a scientific measurement instead of a judgement of your worth as a person (my personal struggle). This morning, I weighed in and saw it was up a couple of pounds from where I thought I would be and made all kinds of noise about how I ate too much salty stuff yesterday, etc, etc. Then my husband noticed that the scale was on kg instead of lb... yeah, I weighed myself again, and was right where I thought I'd be. So apparently I have a ways to go, mentally speaking. I got myself worked up into a bit of a state over a couple of pounds, which turned out to not be true, anyway. (82kg = 180lbs, and I just saw the 82 and assumed). I'm going to drink ALL the water today and see what happens tomorrow :lol: OK, still some scale issues for me.

Edited by Jen581791
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9 hours ago, Sharksgrl99 said:

@NerdyLady thank you for that link. I've read it back and forth like 3 times now and saved it. Very informative. 

@Jen581791 thank you for your insight. You seem a lot like me. I think I just need to take a step back and not let it get to me as much right now. We will see how it goes. 

@Sharksgrl99 I'm glad you found it helpful. Frankly, it was much more helpful than the document provided by my surgeon. I saved the PDF to every device I own as well as printed it out. :D That dog eared hard copy is well travelled. I take it everywhere!

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I didn't start seeing any difference at all until I had lost over 50 pounds. 34 of which I lost pre op. And then it was only in my face and arms. I'm at 100 pounds now, and I can really see it in my upper body, but my belly and butt still look huge...despite what my family tells me. I only see my youngest daughter about once every 4-6 weeks, and when I saw her 2 days ago, she called me "tiny". ME...tiny. I'm far from tiny, but this is the smallest she has ever seen me, and now that she can put her arms all the way around me to give me a hug, she thinks I'm tiny. My therapist tells me that it takes some people months to actually physically "see" their own weight loss, despite what everyone else around them sees. 

As far as your stalls...my surgeon tells me that sometimes WLS shocks your body to the point of holding on to the weight for several weeks after surgery. It will start coming off. Stick to your plan. I know how gut wrenchingly hard it is, but try as hard as you can to not let these thoughts control you. I lost more weight preop, eating 800-850 calories a day for 8 weeks than I did immediately post op, only consuming like 250 calories a day. Try to hang in there...I know it's easier said than done, but trust the process ❤️

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@Sharksgrl99 Different things happen at different times. I first noticed that I lost some weight around my neck and face and developed a bit more delineation there. Some clothes fit more easily. My sleeping improved as my sleep apnea got better. My exercise tolerance improved. Each of these had its own pattern. I now have a slender, strong chest and arms... with a bit of a pot belly and still generous thighs. Early on though I noticed that when I cycled they no longer rubbed the seat, and with more loss I can dangle my crossed leg. -_- Now I can see the pulsing beat of one of the arteries in my wrist. 

You'll do fine. Just suggest you examine or look at all the different ways you might evidence the loss; your facial contours, the fit of your clothes, how much you can bend or move or walk or ride; the total of the inches around the various parts of your body that you are measuring... The scale is just one of the ways, which is a summary statistic...

Don't forget to consider things like your blood pressure or heart rate or (if you were/are diabetic) your sugars. I had only borderline hypertension and sugars but my blood pressure is down. To my surprise my resting heart rate, which I check in the morning before getting out of bed, went down a lot after surgery; some due to being more fit, and some due to the sleep apnea going away (lack of oxygen at night not good for your heart). Your body will whisper things to you as you get slim.

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3 minutes ago, BurgundyBoy said:

 To my surprise my resting heart rate, which I check in the morning before getting out of bed, went down a lot after surgery; some due to being more fit, and some due to the sleep apnea going away (lack of oxygen at night not good for your heart). Your body will whisper things to you as you get slim.

As usual, I totally agree with BurgundyBoy. 

With respect to the resting heart rate (or "pulse"), before gastric bypass surgery I had a quite rapid heart rate.  When I recently went to the Red Cross to donate blood (yes, you can donate blood after weight loss surgery!), the nurse told me that my pulse rate was very low and was almost too low to donate blood. 

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5 minutes ago, Res Ipsa said:

As usual, I totally agree with BurgundyBoy. 

With respect to the resting heart rate (or "pulse"), before gastric bypass surgery I had a quite rapid heart rate.  When I recently went to the Red Cross to donate blood (yes, you can donate blood after weight loss surgery!), the nurse told me that my pulse rate was very low and was almost too low to donate blood. 

Res Ipsa, That's interesting! Maybe we should do a poll of people and see if they have before-after numbers. As I recall you are quite the trim gentleman. 

@Sharksgrl99 for what it is worth, "normal" heart rate is 60-100 for adults. In the mornings, mine was in the 70s before surgery but would surge up into the 90s if I had been really apneic. Recently have been in the 48-52 range which is a sign of being aerobically fit. My WLS surgeon was more than a little surprised at my 3 month visit (was 51 then). 

I bet a lot of us have hearts that are so used to being flogged - I read someplace that each pound of extra weight is another 50 miles of blood vessels that needs to have blood pushed through it - that as we start to lose weight our hearts seem like those of a very athletic person and they just don't have to beat so frequently to do the job. 

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@BurgundyBoy I was shocked when they took my blood pressure the afternoon of my orthopaedic surgery. I should have been quite stressed at that time and when "normal" for me was around 137/85, it came it at 114/70. Added to that my O2 saturation was 100%, which I don't think I've ever achieved before. Now I see I should have paid more attention and checked out my resting HR.

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On 9/12/2017 at 10:17 PM, Aussie H said:

@BurgundyBoy I was shocked when they took my blood pressure the afternoon of my orthopaedic surgery. I should have been quite stressed at that time and when "normal" for me was around 137/85, it came it at 114/70. Added to that my O2 saturation was 100%, which I don't think I've ever achieved before. Now I see I should have paid more attention and checked out my resting HR.

Aussie I bet you are nearly pulseless. ;) it's funny but I can't find any science papers on this, just lots on BP. 

Now that I think about it I bet your docs have HR values recorded. .... part of the standard vital signs. I find the values when still abed in the am the lowest of the day, but consistency from the docs office should be there...

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On 9/8/2017 at 4:44 AM, Skinnykat said:

I lost 22 pounds the month before surgery. Then by month: 16 pounds, 10 pounds, 12 pounds, 10 pounds, 10 pounds; last two months: around 5 pounds in total. I had stalls which stressed me at the time but looking back the trend was ineluctably downwards. I started noticing changes about month 3 - at month 8 everyone notices it.

To some extent, in the first year much of the weight loss follows its own momentum.

Things to do to help weight loss, based on my experience:

i) don't worry about stalls (I am a daily weigher too); you have a magic tool that will get you effortlessly over stalls (but only for the first year or so);

ii) build good habits. For me, this was high protein, low carb, intermittent fasting, walking one hour, hydration, vitamins/minerals and dental care;

iii) eat really delicious, high quality food (for me, salmon, 85% chocolate, French cheese) and do exercise you love (for me, walking with podcasts)

iv) don't make unsustainable changes (I still occasionally eat mouthfuls of cake, drink glass or so of alcohol and sparkling water daily)

v) it seems that too much exercise slows weight loss? consider not hitting the gym and walking instead

vi) avoid the pitfalls of WLS failure: grazing, slider foods, sodas

@Skinnykat At what point in your journey did you start IF? 16/8? 20/4? How long of a window do you give yourself? 

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