MargM

Regret and buyer's remorse 9 weeks post-op

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Having bit of buyer's remorse today. About 9 weeks out (6/20 RYN) and nothing tastes good - eating or drinking. Water (at all temperatures and with any type of addition - fruit, crystal lite, tea) tastes terrible and bothers my pouch. Same with everything I eat - it ether tastes terrible or does not sit well in my pouch. Eating with my family brings me to tears because I just want to *enjoy* something. Anything. The number on the scale and other NSV are fine but right now they are not enough to make me feel good about anything. Please tell me this will pass or that at least others have felt/feel the same. Really regretting my decision today.

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<< Sympathy >>

Yes I have felt the same exact way... angry or deeply remorseful can't eat something or other, what I recall as the taste is just not there, and at a festive dinner am only able to eat small amounts here and there. PIssed. Thinking I was nuts. With you on this. 

<< Empathy >>

_____________________________________________________

My experience is that it passes. Making a killer dinner tonight that I love, beans with bacon bits and roasted fresh tomatoes with melted Parmagian.  and even if my portions are very small, it tastes great, looks great, and shares great. Maybe because I was obese for longer than you, the benefits are more real on a daily basis to me: the fact my painful back is 99% better - I'm pain free most days - sex life better - walking better - exercise easier - I look trim and ship-shape now - ... but all this is words, you need to feel something real to you that has meaning. I think you'll be there soon. 

Congrats on the 40 lbs down, by the way. Not that I want to intrude into the solemnity around the buyer's remorse. 

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Ugh. So sorry you're feeling this way. Have you talked to your surgeon about nothing feeling right? I've had to mourn the change in family meals and special occasions. To me, it's worth it. I'm so sorry you don't feel the same. Glad you came here to vent. So much understanding here.

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Hi @MargM - my sympathies for not feeling happy at 9 weeks out. You may want to ask your team about things not sitting well in your pouch - not that it's something to worry about, but just to see if they have any ideas.

As for things tasting bad, this is true for me at 6.5 months out and I'm starting to feel like it might be forever-ish. (Yours may go away, though) However, I am looking at this as an advantage: I am not interested in food, so I am not tempted to eat things I shouldn't. I don't feel like I want to use food for emotional reasons because it's no longer comforting. That forces me to deal with stress/boredom/anger/joy/etc in different ways (probably for the first time ever), which is great training for when my honeymoon period is over and I start feeling real hunger again. I still feel a little disappointed that things don't taste good, but I'm getting used to it. 

I read a study a while back (can't find it now of course) showing that  people with more food aversions post-op have an easier time getting to goal and staying there. Makes a ton of sense! :) 

I've invented a new definition of the word "delicious" so I could stop driving my husband crazy: it now means "this food has plenty of protein and it's sitting well in my pouch," so when he asks how xyz food is, I can say "delicious," instead of "you know that nothing tastes good to me anymore." I used it at my MIL's at dinner and my husband nearly laughed out loud. 

Thats my positive spin on food aversions. Granted, I've had a few more months to get used to it. My "oh woe is me" period was around 1-3 months out.

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1 hour ago, Michael_A said:

FYI - that link did not work for me due to a need for a password - but here is the same page unlocked...

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:Kesyu7jPcIcJ:www.medscape.com/viewarticle/824138+&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us

Here are the first three paragraphs of the article:

Following gastric-bypass surgery, almost all patients will have a smaller appetite, but they will also probably find that some foods no longer taste or smell the same, a new study reports. Moreover, patients who develop a dislike for foods they enjoyed before — often meat — lose more weight than their peers.

These findings are based on questionnaire replies from 103 obese patients who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric-bypass surgery at a center in the United Kingdom. After their surgery, almost all patients (97%) reported a drop in appetite, and many reported that some foods tasted differently (73%) or smelled differently (42%).

"This was a snapshot study in time trying to put some sense to anecdotal patient comments about how their taste and smell senses have changed," senior author David J. Bowrey, MD, from the Leicester Royal Infirmary, United Kingdom, told Medscape Medical News. "The good part…is that patients who had aversions…to certain foods had greater weight loss than some of the other patients."

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@MargM

Perhaps not like you or the others, really have not found that my tastes in food have changed... have found that the amount I want to eat has changed.

For what it is worth I still really like a bunch of savory foods. I baked bacon in the oven to cook out the fat without frying, and crumpled it into some beans and tomatoes with cheese last night. Does that end of things no longer attract you too?

At the risk of suggesting something that you may be (appropriately) avoiding, I find a small glass of, uh, water that has been blessed by grapes, sometimes makes the food seem better, especially if ingested before the meal itself. But maybe that is true for everyone and not just people with WLS....

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1 hour ago, BurgundyBoy said:

@MargM

Perhaps not like you or the others, really have not found that my tastes in food have changed... have found that the amount I want to eat has changed.

For what it is worth I still really like a bunch of savory foods. I baked bacon in the oven to cook out the fat without frying, and crumpled it into some beans and tomatoes with cheese last night. Does that end of things no longer attract you too?

At the risk of suggesting something that you may be (appropriately) avoiding, I find a small glass of, uh, water that has been blessed by grapes, sometimes makes the food seem better, especially if ingested before the meal itself. But maybe that is true for everyone and not just people with WLS....

"blessed by grapes" made me laugh so hard. I have been avoiding this type of beverage since I am only 9 weeks out but maybe a sip would not be the worst thing.

I appreciate you reaching out.  I have not found new things that I like, just a giant list of things that i used like that now taste like garbage. I think that's been the hardest part - not having tasty new replacements for things that are on the gross list. I know it will come but this last week has just been horrible. Part of it is that my mind gets excited about something I have bee known to like and it doesn't know how to deal when I eat that thing that should be delicious but now tastes like nastiness. I know it's about changing my mindset a bit. I will get there, I just needed some lifting up today.

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Posted (edited)

18 hours ago, MargM said:

Having bit of buyer's remorse today. About 9 weeks out (6/20 RYN) and nothing tastes good - eating or drinking. Water (at all temperatures and with any type of addition - fruit, crystal lite, tea) tastes terrible and bothers my pouch. Same with everything I eat - it ether tastes terrible or does not sit well in my pouch. Eating with my family brings me to tears because I just want to *enjoy* something. Anything. The number on the scale and other NSV are fine but right now they are not enough to make me feel good about anything. Please tell me this will pass or that at least others have felt/feel the same. Really regretting my decision today.

I didn't enjoy food for a while post-op. Can't remember how long that lasted. The good news/bad news is my enjoyment came back. I don't feel the way I used to feel about food. I have no interesting in polishing off cartons, bags or containers of things. But, many things taste delicious to me now and it can be difficult to stop eating. 

Regarding family meals or eating with friends - I worked to focus more on the social aspect of eating with others and less on the food. I also spent time cultivating new hobbies and activities to replace the time I spent eating. I like things that make me feel good. While I was eating, food always made me feel great so I had to find new things that made me feel good. 

 

Hang in there. It gets better. Use this time to create new habits and a new relationship with food. You'll want to be prepared for when food does start to taste good again so you don't deviate from your plan on a regular basis. 

Edited by Stephtay
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17 hours ago, BurgundyBoy said:

<< Sympathy >>

Yes I have felt the same exact way... angry or deeply remorseful can't eat something or other, what I recall as the taste is just not there, and at a festive dinner am only able to eat small amounts here and there. PIssed. Thinking I was nuts. With you on this. 

<< Empathy >>

_____________________________________________________

My experience is that it passes. Making a killer dinner tonight that I love, beans with bacon bits and roasted fresh tomatoes with melted Parmagian.  and even if my portions are very small, it tastes great, looks great, and shares great. Maybe because I was obese for longer than you, the benefits are more real on a daily basis to me: the fact my painful back is 99% better - I'm pain free most days - sex life better - walking better - exercise easier - I look trim and ship-shape now - ... but all this is words, you need to feel something real to you that has meaning. I think you'll be there soon. 

Congrats on the 40 lbs down, by the way. Not that I want to intrude into the solemnity around the buyer's remorse. 

@BurgundyBoy That's totally it too - I understand the theory and that it *will* get better but today, it's crappy. And I don't want theory or future or some day - I want to feel good about food today, enjoy things today. So, basically that makes me sound like a pouty 4 -year old but it's not just that. I think part of this is mourning - for the way things were, for the changes and the differences that will come, for foods that just won't work for me anymore. That's where the sadness comes in, anyway.

The physical part...well, I am not sure. Like I said, water of any kind or temperature tastes horrible. I did discover I can chew ice chips so that's what I am doing to stay hydrated. Food though....blah to pretty much all of it. Hopefully I will find something(s) I like (and soon) but right now, nothing is doing it for me. Taste is part of it yes, but it's also that my pouch sort of "grumbles' when I put anything in it. Literally, anything. Is that normal?

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2 minutes ago, Stephtay said:

I didn't enjoy food for a while post-op. Can't remember how long that lasted. The good news/bad news is my enjoyment came back. I don't feel the way I used to feel about food. I have no interesting in polishing off cartons, bags or containers of things. But, many things taste delicious to me now and it can be difficult to stop eating. 

Regarding family meals or eating with friends - I worked to focus more on the social aspect of eating with others and less on the food. I also spent time cultivating new hobbies and activities to replace the time I spent eating. I like things that make me feel good. While I was eating, food always made me feel great so I had to find new things that made me feel good. 

 

Hang in there. It gets better. Use this time to create new habits and a new relationship with food. You'll want to be prepared for when food does start to taste good again so you don't deviate from your plan on a regular basis. 

As usual, I 100 percent agree with Stephtay. :)

Not liking most foods right after surgery is a good thing as it helps break using food as a source of emotional comfort or joy.  This will give you time to develop a new and much more healthy "relationship with food" - which is crucial for long term success after weight loss surgery.

Your love of most foods will come back, it really will (unless the food makes you dump - I'm looking at you ice cream :angry:), but when it does you should be emotionally ready not to rely on food for comfort.  I love to eat food, I enjoy its taste and texture, but I now do not view eating food as a way to feel better when I am under stress or bored.

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7 minutes ago, Stephtay said:

I didn't enjoy food for a while post-op. Can't remember how long that lasted. The good news/bad news is my enjoyment came back. I don't feel the way I used to feel about food. I have no interesting in polishing off cartons, bags or containers of things. But, many things taste delicious to me now and it can be difficult to stop eating. 

Regarding family meals or eating with friends - I worked to focus more on the social aspect of eating with others and less on the food. I also spent time cultivating new hobbies and activities to replace the time I spent eating. I like things that make me feel good. While I was eating, food always made me feel great so I had to find new things that made me feel good. 

 

Hang in there. It gets better. Use this time to create new habits and a new relationship with food. You'll want to be prepared for when food does start to taste good again so you don't deviate from your plan on a regular basis. 

 

Thanks for sharing @Stephtay I needed to hear that it does get better so I appreciate you sharing you story with me. My family has been so loving and supportive of all of this and are very patient with where I am in the process. I mostly just miss the enjoyment of food - the tastes, the textures, the flavors. Just taking one bit of something and savoring it. I have not done that in so long it's making me so sad. I know that part of it is that I have not found my "new" food loves; I just keep running into "old" foods that taste like crap. And water. God, I miss the enjoyment of water so much. Ice chips are literally the only way I can stay hydrated. I miss just enjoying a nice cool glass of water on a summer's day. And I am sad because 1) I don't know if I will *ever* enjoy that and 2) I have not found any thing to replace that (no mater how hard I have tried).

I am just having a "moment", I know. I also know it will get better. I am not a "cook" in anyway, shape, or form, but I am now realizing that's going to have to change. Maybe some cooking classes would be helpful?

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4 minutes ago, Res Ipsa said:

As usual, I 100 percent agree with Stephtay. :)

Not liking most foods right after surgery is a good thing as it helps break using food as a source of emotional comfort or joy.  This will give you time to develop a new and much more healthy "relationship with food" - which is crucial for long term success after weight loss surgery.

Your love of most foods will come back, it really will (unless the food makes you dump - I'm looking at you ice cream :angry:), but when it does you should be emotionally ready not to rely on food for comfort.  I love to eat food, I enjoy its taste and texture, but I now do not view eating food as a way to feel better when I am under stress or bored.

I am comfortable with managing the issue of avoiding food to comfort me (at least I think I am), I just want to be able to enjoy the taste of a well made dish (in appropriate portions!) I just have not found anything that tastes even remotely good. But thank you for telling me that it will get better and that my love of foods will come back. If you don't mind me ask, how long did it take it to come back for you? (Of course, I realize all of our journeys are different. Just curious.)

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6 minutes ago, MargM said:

Thanks for sharing @Stephtay I needed to hear that it does get better so I appreciate you sharing you story with me. My family has been so loving and supportive of all of this and are very patient with where I am in the process. I mostly just miss the enjoyment of food - the tastes, the textures, the flavors. Just taking one bit of something and savoring it. I have not done that in so long it's making me so sad. I know that part of it is that I have not found my "new" food loves; I just keep running into "old" foods that taste like crap. And water. God, I miss the enjoyment of water so much. Ice chips are literally the only way I can stay hydrated. I miss just enjoying a nice cool glass of water on a summer's day. And I am sad because 1) I don't know if I will *ever* enjoy that and 2) I have not found any thing to replace that (no mater how hard I have tried).

I am just having a "moment", I know. I also know it will get better. I am not a "cook" in anyway, shape, or form, but I am now realizing that's going to have to change. Maybe some cooking classes would be helpful?

Pre-op I knew I was really, really, REALLY going to miss Doritos. I sobbed in the chip section one day. Sobbed! I wrote break up letters to some of my favorite foods. I thought/feared post-op I would never enjoy food again. That just isn't the case. I've had the good fortune to meet a few of the ladies here on TT offline and share a meal with them. All of them enjoy food too. Pre-op I loved water. I would chug it, sip it and everything in between. Your capacity for liquids will change. I would call your dr. if you haven't already regarding your challenges staying hydrated. If ice chips are the only way you can get in your fluids I think your dr. should know that. I didn't cook pre-op and I don't cook now. I eat a lot of salads, cheese, nuts, yogurt. I tend to eat the same things over and over but I did the same pre-op. Keep reminding yourself you will like food again. It will just be different. 

 

Here is a great example about how my relationship with food has changed. Just yesterday my husband and I went for brunch. I'm not a big brunch person so we picked a steakhouse so he could have steak and bacon for brunch. I wanted something sweet so I ordered the cinnamon coffee cake fritters. I figured I'd have a few bites and either he'd eat the rest or I'd just leave what I didn't eat. They arrived and looked good. I cut into one and they weren't quite cooked all the way through. I didn't even taste it. I just told the server "these aren't done in the middle." He offered to bring me new ones and I told him no. Pre-op, I would have picked off the dough that was cooked or taken the server up on his offer to bring me new ones. Yesterday I had a salad coming as well as padron peppers. I knew I would have more than enough to eat so it was easy to move past the sweet dish I'd ordered. Also, pre-op I would have been quietly and only on the inside super mad that the fritters weren't perfect. I would have felt robbed so later in the day I would have gotten something else sweet to make up for it. (I'm laughing as I type this because as absurd as this sounds - this is exactly what I would have done pre-op!)

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6 minutes ago, MargM said:

I am comfortable with managing the issue of avoiding food to comfort me (at least I think I am), I just want to be able to enjoy the taste of a well made dish (in appropriate portions!) I just have not found anything that tastes even remotely good. But thank you for telling me that it will get better and that my love of foods will come back. If you don't mind me ask, how long did it take it to come back for you? (Of course, I realize all of our journeys are different. Just curious.)

My love of food came back gradually between months 2 and 5 after my gastric bypass surgery.  By 6 months out I could enjoy food just like before, but I was emotionally ready to limit my food intake to mostly healthy foods and always healthy amounts.

But I have found that I do not enjoy eating foods that made me feel bad - so anything that has made me dump (like ice cream or really sweet drinks) or more likely to throw up (like steak, hamburgers or roast beef) or are tough on my stomach (like strong alcoholic drinks or carbonation) have become of little interest to me.  I enjoy chicken, cheese and fish more now than before.  I still eat and enjoy lots of spicy food.  Now that I am at my goal weight, I eat lower fat crackers in moderation (such as Goldfish and Wheat Thins), and most days include a little chocolate :D.  Life is good and food is still an important part of my life (I just eat a better diet and a lot less food). 

I do not miss my old diet at all, and truly wonder why I used to eat so much food and so much unhealthy food. 

While I do not drink much water, I drink lots of no-calorie flavored waters (like unsweetened ices tea, Vitamin Water Zero and Bai drinks). 

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I'm sorry this is getting you down. I'm disappointed that I no longer like water (although I have been liking it in the last week or so), but happy I like tea. Do you have a Camelbak Eddy water bottle? I got the insulated metal one (can't stand drinking out of plastic), & it really helps get the fluids in.

Maybe, once the worst of the mourning is over, you can have fun going on a hunt for new foods you enjoy. For me, paper wrapped chicken from a Chinese restaurant tasted AMAZING. So did crab legs. Maybe you'll find a deli with great chicken salad or egg salad. Maybe the marinated chicken at a Greek place will be the ticket. Or pulled pork from a BBQ place. Get out and go to some happy hours. I went to one and just loved the bacon-wrapped scallops. Just keep trying. Something will work.

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8 hours ago, Michael_A said:

Bingo. Can I use you as my personal google? I can just say "I saw this thing the other day, something about xyz, don't remember where," and you'll say "Was it this?" That will be so convenient. Thanks Micheal. You're great ;) 

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@MargM

By the way, after my surgery I found that I liked drinking water a lot more if I add a twist of lemon or lime to the glass. 

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18 hours ago, Jen581791 said:

Hi @MargM - my sympathies for not feeling happy at 9 weeks out. You may want to ask your team about things not sitting well in your pouch - not that it's something to worry about, but just to see if they have any ideas.

As for things tasting bad, this is true for me at 6.5 months out and I'm starting to feel like it might be forever-ish. (Yours may go away, though) However, I am looking at this as an advantage: I am not interested in food, so I am not tempted to eat things I shouldn't. I don't feel like I want to use food for emotional reasons because it's no longer comforting. That forces me to deal with stress/boredom/anger/joy/etc in different ways (probably for the first time ever), which is great training for when my honeymoon period is over and I start feeling real hunger again. I still feel a little disappointed that things don't taste good, but I'm getting used to it. 

I read a study a while back (can't find it now of course) showing that  people with more food aversions post-op have an easier time getting to goal and staying there. Makes a ton of sense! :) 

I've invented a new definition of the word "delicious" so I could stop driving my husband crazy: it now means "this food has plenty of protein and it's sitting well in my pouch," so when he asks how xyz food is, I can say "delicious," instead of "you know that nothing tastes good to me anymore." I used it at my MIL's at dinner and my husband nearly laughed out loud. 

Thats my positive spin on food aversions. Granted, I've had a few more months to get used to it. My "oh woe is me" period was around 1-3 months out.

I am in prime "woe is me" for sure. And I do know that's part  of it. But as you have clearly outlined so much of it is perspective. I appreciate you being honest about your experience and not just saying "it will get better" because honestly, there is always a chance it won't. So I guess my choice is to create a framework that works for me and allows me to put a positive spin on it or just be miserable for (a while? a long time? ever?) I LOVE the idea of re-defining what "delicious" means. I might try "tasty" or some other - I think I want to save delicious for when (see, optimism!) food does taste good. I will have to think about that and post here. That's a great idea and something I can incorporate today.

If you don't mind me asking, does all of this make you regret your decision? Would you do anything differently knowing what you know now?

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2 hours ago, Stephtay said:

Pre-op I knew I was really, really, REALLY going to miss Doritos. I sobbed in the chip section one day. Sobbed! I wrote break up letters to some of my favorite foods. I thought/feared post-op I would never enjoy food again. That just isn't the case. I've had the good fortune to meet a few of the ladies here on TT offline and share a meal with them. All of them enjoy food too. Pre-op I loved water. I would chug it, sip it and everything in between. Your capacity for liquids will change. I would call your dr. if you haven't already regarding your challenges staying hydrated. If ice chips are the only way you can get in your fluids I think your dr. should know that. I didn't cook pre-op and I don't cook now. I eat a lot of salads, cheese, nuts, yogurt. I tend to eat the same things over and over but I did the same pre-op. Keep reminding yourself you will like food again. It will just be different. 

 

Here is a great example about how my relationship with food has changed. Just yesterday my husband and I went for brunch. I'm not a big brunch person so we picked a steakhouse so he could have steak and bacon for brunch. I wanted something sweet so I ordered the cinnamon coffee cake fritters. I figured I'd have a few bites and either he'd eat the rest or I'd just leave what I didn't eat. They arrived and looked good. I cut into one and they weren't quite cooked all the way through. I didn't even taste it. I just told the server "these aren't done in the middle." He offered to bring me new ones and I told him no. Pre-op, I would have picked off the dough that was cooked or taken the server up on his offer to bring me new ones. Yesterday I had a salad coming as well as padron peppers. I knew I would have more than enough to eat so it was easy to move past the sweet dish I'd ordered. Also, pre-op I would have been quietly and only on the inside super mad that the fritters weren't perfect. I would have felt robbed so later in the day I would have gotten something else sweet to make up for it. (I'm laughing as I type this because as absurd as this sounds - this is exactly what I would have done pre-op!)

@Stephtay The smart, logical part of me knows (or at least *hopes* it will get better) but being in the now and not feeling or seeing any end in sight is a challenge. Something I realized today though - and this may be part of it - I am not a super fan of the unknown. And this is all about the unknown. I mean, I think I *thought* I knew what I was getting into but that's not the same as experiencing it, right? I think my issue too is that I *did* think I would enjoy food post-op; i did not expect to not enjoy eating so this period, whatever it is, is throwing me off. I do hope it passes but I also think I have to be prepared that it might not. WIth that in mind, I have to come up with a better framework for dealing and a way to positively spin things a bit. You guys have all given me great ideas, suggestions and feedback and I am going to work with some of these tips and see what I can come up with.

I love that you wrote letters to your foods. I think that's a great idea and I might have to do that. The one thing I miss soooooooooooooooooo badly that makes me want to cry is coffee. I can't handle it at all and I was a HUGE coffee drinker. Maybe writing a letter would help.I am going to try it and see what happens. Thanks for sharing yours stories. All of this is so personal. I am so grateful I found this group and folks here who are willing to be open and honest about things.

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1 hour ago, Gretta said:

I'm sorry this is getting you down. I'm disappointed that I no longer like water (although I have been liking it in the last week or so), but happy I like tea. Do you have a Camelbak Eddy water bottle? I got the insulated metal one (can't stand drinking out of plastic), & it really helps get the fluids in.

Maybe, once the worst of the mourning is over, you can have fun going on a hunt for new foods you enjoy. For me, paper wrapped chicken from a Chinese restaurant tasted AMAZING. So did crab legs. Maybe you'll find a deli with great chicken salad or egg salad. Maybe the marinated chicken at a Greek place will be the ticket. Or pulled pork from a BBQ place. Get out and go to some happy hours. I went to one and just loved the bacon-wrapped scallops. Just keep trying. Something will work.

I have every water bottle imaginable including that one. Still a no go with anything - water, tea, crystal lite. I will just keep doing ice chips and hope things get better.

 

Gretta, I do love the idea of making an adventure out of it....I have noticed that at least somethings interest me (i have not tried them yet) that I did not like before. For example, I was never a "fish" person but the last two days I have been thinking that fish looks and sounds delicious. I think because things have not been sitting well I have been afraid to try but maybe that's actually the point where i need to leap. Maybe I will try some fish and see how it goes. 

 

Thank you for your support and ideas! It has helped me so much and I really needed it these last few days!

 

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23 minutes ago, MargM said:

 I can't handle it at all and I was a HUGE coffee drinker. Maybe writing a letter would help.I am going to try it and see what happens. Thanks for sharing yours stories. All of this is so personal. I am so grateful I found this group and folks here who are willing to be open and honest about things.

Pre-op I drank several cups of coffee a day. I still drink it! I drink decaf with a protein shake and milk. It is not exactly the same but I like it just as much. Lots of people here who still enjoy coffee (regular and decaf) and have WLS recipes to recreate the various Starbucks drinks if that was your thing.

You are right, you might not ever enjoy food again. But I think that is very rare. Pre-op I remember telling my therapist (with tears running down my cheeks), "I'm afraid I will miss food everyday for the rest of my life." She told me I might, but it wasn't likely. Thankfully that wasn't the case because I'm not someone who believes 'nothing tastes as good as skinny feels'. Skinny or thin feels pretty great but I can think of 800 things that taste fantastic. 

 

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One last thought for you to consider is this - as you lose weight, as you become thin, healthy, and able to effortlessly be active, you will come to realize so many wonderful joys in life that are beyond imagination now. 

For example, walking into a room and not being adversely judged due to your weight, being able to fit easily into an airplane seat, being able to buy attractive clothing anywhere, being able to be active and not get hot and sweaty, being able to sit on any chair and not worry that it might collapse, being happy to be in group photos rather than avoiding them, waking up in the morning and feeling so very healthy and alive, going to the doctor and not getting the lose weight lecture, fitting into amusement park rides, and finally (and perhaps most importantly) knowing that you probably will live your life ten or more years longer (growing old with your family and friends) due to your weight loss. 

Nothing tastes as good as skinny feels. Yes, it's a cliche statement, but it also is very true. 

CurvyMermaid, cinwa, LeeC and 4 others like this

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12 minutes ago, Stephtay said:

 Thankfully that wasn't the case because I'm not someone who believes 'nothing tastes as good as skinny feels'. Skinny or thin feels pretty great but I can think of 800 things that taste fantastic. 

 

I'm with you! I dislike that saying in a major way.

Stephtay likes this

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1 hour ago, Stephtay said:

 Thankfully that wasn't the case because I'm not someone who believes 'nothing tastes as good as skinny feels'. Skinny or thin feels pretty great but I can think of 800 things that taste fantastic. 

 

 

59 minutes ago, Gretta said:

I'm with you! I dislike that saying in a major way.

"Nothing tastes as good as skinny feels."

After my surgery, I originally did not like the saying at all.  I was trained as a chef when I was younger, and I loved and still love the taste of good food.  I wanted to be able to fully enjoy food and still remain skinny. 

However, over the years since my weight loss surgery I have come to embrace this saying as it reminds me that remaining thin and healthy is the most important thing with respect to eating.  I accept that other people may feel differently. 

Over my years here at TTF I have witnessed many people come on this forum, have weight loss surgery, lose lots of weight and then after a few years regain much of that weight.  Everyone's weight loss surgery journey is different, but I intend to do everything that I can to make sure that weight regain does not happen to me.

I spent decades unsuccessfully trying to lose weight and keep it off.  My gastric bypass was and is my last option.  Thus, for me personally, it is totally unacceptable to regain any of my excess weight now that I have reached my goal weight.  Failure is simply not an option, and I will not allow my love of food to allow me to regain any of my excess weight.  That is not to say that I do not and cannot enjoy good food now that I am at my goal weight, I do, but I do it as part of a balanced healthy diet.  I eat out at restaurants on a regular basis, but I am careful overall what I eat each day.

Thus, to me the saying simply reflects my belief that no food is worth regaining weight for.  I truly love the taste of food, but I enjoy even more the freedom and joys of being thin and healthy.  Most importantly, I had the surgery so that I could live longer with my family and friends, and hopefully witness lots of weddings, births and other joyous family occasions that would not be possible if I remained overweight and at risk for an early death.

So to me the saying simply means that no food tastes so good that it is worth gaining weight for and becoming overweight again.

Aussie H, Sally L, MargM and 7 others like this

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