Jackie Sanchez

I'm scared

34 posts in this topic

Thank you Zyia for this post. Your success, and your ability to explain the pros and cons of a gastric bypass, are an inspiration to us all - and especially to newbies considering whether or not to have weight loss surgery. 

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I am scared, too, Jackie. I lost about 16 pounds so far pre-op and my blood sugar dropped to normal levels, my blood pressure is perfect and my lab results were ideal. All this just from exercising and dieting. Makes me think maybe I could skip the surgery (expected date in Sept). Then I remember that I have been unable to lose weight except when I was a teen and in my 20s. Now I am 60 years old. Each time I put on more weight. I developed diabetes in my 30s, it progressively got worse until I now take 2 kinds of insulin, plus pills, plus pills for high blood pressure, high fats in my blood, high cholesterol. I developed diabetic retinopathy, yes, I went from having good vision to becoming legally blind overnight, literally. Still, I ate what I wanted. I had to get laser eye surgery at least 6 times in each eye and then developed edema of the eyes which required injections IN THE EYE! Still, ate what I wanted. My feet burned at night (peripheral neuropathy). Still did not stop overeating. Then one day, last January, my general doctor told me I had to control my diabetes and lose weight or I would be on dialysis by Dec. Here I am pre-op. So, yes you are healthy right now, but life can change in a heart beat and you'd be surprised how much you can gain and still make excuses. I need to drop about 10 more lbs before surgery. For the rest of my life I have to make my weight control a priority. I hope the diabetes reverses itself. I hope I get a (late) second chance at being healthy. I hope you do not wait as long as I have to give yourself the advantages of a healthy weight and a healthy life.

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On 4/8/2017 at 7:27 PM, Jackie Sanchez said:

Thanks for your feedback that's true though but that doesn't take away my concerns of waking up something I didn't intend too. 

Hey Jackie,

I'll be honest, I thought about WLS for years and avoided it and went on diets, exercised and had periods of peaks and valleys where I would lose and gain and lose and gain and etc... I was also very lucky that like you I had NO problems that come with obesity (apart from obvious things like limited physical stamina and such) and even genetic ones that some of my family has that weight just exacerbates - like diabetes and hypertension.

But after talking to doctors about the pro's and con's of the surgery, spending some time with folks here and even talking to people who'd had issues after the surgery, my bottom line was this:
I'm 33 years old. I have no major health problems and by and large the odds of major negatives on my health from WLS are relatively less and less severe overall compared to the problems I could have being obese and decidedly unable to drop my weight and BMI lower than a certain point without repeatedly hitting a wall. So, I elected to go ahead, make the changes to my life and lifestyle that go with the surgery and hopefully with lower weight and better health, I'll be able to look forward to doing many things I can't really till now and being happier with myself and my life after losing this burden I've been carrying around with me for two decades. If I develop some minor deficiency or other health problem when I'm 50 or 60? Hell we all develop some problem or another as we get older and I'd rather be sick when I'm old I suppose than in the more active and energised days of my life.

Bottom line, you have to decide if it's right for YOU. Whatever all of us say here, everyone here who has had success, it's because they were ready to go down that path and deal with whatever came their way. You will find people even here and all over (I know 2 personally) who had the surgery and not only did they not become slim and fit, they lost some and then proceeded to put the weight back on and one started drinking a LOT, you hear about a lot of problems - but (1) they are not the norm and (2) it's important that like many things, You Must Be Ready and Comfortable. Period.

I found it helped to go to a therapist (a psychologist/psychotherapist, a trained professional - not some diploma holding psychiatrist!) who can help you assess your own state of mind, to see why you are considering surgery, what brought you to this stage, are you in a state of mind to deal with those things and change, are you in a place where you really want it or are you being pressured into it, regardless of that what you want for yourself and whether the surgery is for you or for someone else...

There are many things to consider and personally I say if you are worried and scared and such and do NOT have a pressing/urgent health problem that would benefit from weight loss, take an extra couple of weeks or a month or so - give yourself a deadline to decide and in the meantime tell everyone around to be supportive if they can but mostly back off and talk to people who you trust to be good, unbiased sounding boards and talk about it. Know where in your mind you are and what you want in life and what you are willing to do/deal with/risk to get there.

It's not an easy choice. It's not a small choice. You can come out of it with issues (as you note) but you can also come out of it largely (thankfully) fine and dandy like many of us on the forum with only the odd issue like a little smelly flatulence every once in a while - which you can get a dog/cat and blame it on easily! :)

Take your your time, clear your own mind and just do what is right for you.

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You've gotten really good feedback on here from people at all different stages.  I hope it helps you!  It's a scary decision for lots of us.  Fear of the unknown is very real and can become overwhelming.  I caution you to weigh the facts and not the opinions.  Ask your surgeon about complications in his or her practice and get their real numbers.  After that go with your gut for what's right for you.  

I honestly believe that if you can change your diet and lose weight and not need surgery then that's what you should do.  I couldn't.  I tried. I really really really tried. 

I had sleep apnea, rarely got even a cold, had occasional migraines, and was 50 when I had my surgery.  I was pretty active but was beginning to struggle with even walking and every day maneuvering.  As a result I was becoming more lazy, eating more, moving less.  Although I liked myself, I honestly didn't like my body. 

I thought about surgery for about two years before I did it.  My work insurance changed and dropped the benefit the first time I looked at going through the process.  I was thinking about self pay but momma guilt over kids in college stopped me.  Finally my insurance added back the coverage it so that was it. I'm glad I had to wait because I think it has helped me stay committed.  I'm 27 months out and don't have one regret about the surgery.  

 

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9 hours ago, Aksh said:

Hey Jackie,

I'll be honest, I thought about WLS for years and avoided it and went on diets, exercised and had periods of peaks and valleys where I would lose and gain and lose and gain and etc... I was also very lucky that like you I had NO problems that come with obesity (apart from obvious things like limited physical stamina and such) and even genetic ones that some of my family has that weight just exacerbates - like diabetes and hypertension.

But after talking to doctors about the pro's and con's of the surgery, spending some time with folks here and even talking to people who'd had issues after the surgery, my bottom line was this:
I'm 33 years old. I have no major health problems and by and large the odds of major negatives on my health from WLS are relatively less and less severe overall compared to the problems I could have being obese and decidedly unable to drop my weight and BMI lower than a certain point without repeatedly hitting a wall. So, I elected to go ahead, make the changes to my life and lifestyle that go with the surgery and hopefully with lower weight and better health, I'll be able to look forward to doing many things I can't really till now and being happier with myself and my life after losing this burden I've been carrying around with me for two decades. If I develop some minor deficiency or other health problem when I'm 50 or 60? Hell we all develop some problem or another as we get older and I'd rather be sick when I'm old I suppose than in the more active and energised days of my life.

Bottom line, you have to decide if it's right for YOU. Whatever all of us say here, everyone here who has had success, it's because they were ready to go down that path and deal with whatever came their way. You will find people even here and all over (I know 2 personally) who had the surgery and not only did they not become slim and fit, they lost some and then proceeded to put the weight back on and one started drinking a LOT, you hear about a lot of problems - but (1) they are not the norm and (2) it's important that like many things, You Must Be Ready and Comfortable. Period.

I found it helped to go to a therapist (a psychologist/psychotherapist, a trained professional - not some diploma holding psychiatrist!) who can help you assess your own state of mind, to see why you are considering surgery, what brought you to this stage, are you in a state of mind to deal with those things and change, are you in a place where you really want it or are you being pressured into it, regardless of that what you want for yourself and whether the surgery is for you or for someone else...

There are many things to consider and personally I say if you are worried and scared and such and do NOT have a pressing/urgent health problem that would benefit from weight loss, take an extra couple of weeks or a month or so - give yourself a deadline to decide and in the meantime tell everyone around to be supportive if they can but mostly back off and talk to people who you trust to be good, unbiased sounding boards and talk about it. Know where in your mind you are and what you want in life and what you are willing to do/deal with/risk to get there.

It's not an easy choice. It's not a small choice. You can come out of it with issues (as you note) but you can also come out of it largely (thankfully) fine and dandy like many of us on the forum with only the odd issue like a little smelly flatulence every once in a while - which you can get a dog/cat and blame it on easily! :)

Take your your time, clear your own mind and just do what is right for you.

:wub: i love it! thank you so much for replying to me.. 

I totally agree with you. From the bottom of my heart i now feel i'm ready to have this surgery. Despite the risks there might be i still want to do this and praying i will be one of the good odds of the statistics. About Health 5 months ago when i started my six month process my blood work came back with high levels from my cholesterol  i was afraid when i was told about this :( so my doctor told me to immediately stop consuming fried food and believe i did stop i didn't want to get sick and then 2 months ago all my blood levels came out okay. And after speaking with someone else here really got me thinking and therefore i have decided to proceed without fear. Thank y'all for your support and your wonderful time y'all such wonderful people. 

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On 8/4/2017 at 6:22 PM, Gretta said:

They'll put you on a chewable vitsmin. Look at page 44 of your binder :)

 

:( gosh now i have to buy more.. then i bought them all without making sure they were the right ones. 

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47 minutes ago, Raeme said:

You've gotten really good feedback on here from people at all different stages.  I hope it helps you!  It's a scary decision for lots of us.  Fear of the unknown is very real and can become overwhelming.  I caution you to weigh the facts and not the opinions.  Ask your surgeon about complications in his or her practice and get their real numbers.  After that go with your gut for what's right for you.  

I honestly believe that if you can change your diet and lose weight and not need surgery then that's what you should do.  I couldn't.  I tried. I really really really tried. 

I had sleep apnea, rarely got even a cold, had occasional migraines, and was 50 when I had my surgery.  I was pretty active but was beginning to struggle with even walking and every day maneuvering.  As a result I was becoming more lazy, eating more, moving less.  Although I liked myself, I honestly didn't like my body. 

I thought about surgery for about two years before I did it.  My work insurance changed and dropped the benefit the first time I looked at going through the process.  I was thinking about self pay but momma guilt over kids in college stopped me.  Finally my insurance added back the coverage it so that was it. I'm glad I had to wait because I think it has helped me stay committed.  I'm 27 months out and don't have one regret about the surgery.  

 

that's very true however i have had tried so many different options to lose weight and i probably did lost couple pounds but that's just about it. I been doing this for so many years and i notice my only problem i have is my precious stomach pouch it doesn't get full it takes for ever to tell me when its full and when it tells me it's when its about to explode! 

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7 minutes ago, Jackie Sanchez said:

:( gosh now i have to buy more.. then i bought them all without making sure they were the right ones. 

Maybe just get the Flintstones Complete vitamins. I think you might have the same trouble with the Centrum chewables that I did. Remember you have to take 2 a day after surgery (1 morning, 1 evening).

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I don't know if it helps, but for multi-vitamins I've been using these that my Doc's office gave me post-op:

Bariatric Fusion

I order the orange flavoured ones as I find the berry types overly sweet and these are quick and easy to chew and seem to be very good and unlike many others, are apparently meant for bariatric patients. You should ask your Doc for alternative recommendations including his opinion on many of the ones suggested on this forum.

13 hours ago, Jackie Sanchez said:

that's very true however i have had tried so many different options to lose weight and i probably did lost couple pounds but that's just about it. I been doing this for so many years and i notice my only problem i have is my precious stomach pouch it doesn't get full it takes for ever to tell me when its full and when it tells me it's when its about to explode! 

I think that was one thing that became clear as I looked up weight loss pre-deciding on going for surgery - turns out if you're fat enough for long enough, your body's baseline for "normal" shifts and when you try and drop more than a few pounds/kilo's your body itself fights you in terms of Metabolic Rate, in fact it slows it down. So if normal exercise would make your metabolism go up by X, your body slows it down from that so you need to be physically able to push EVEN HARDER to even reach X rate of calorie burn and that's on top of trying to minimise calories which also your body wants to fight to store because it thinks you're ill and/or starving or something due to the drastic weight drop.

It's kind of funny if you think about it.

Also your stomach cells are producers (as I understood it) of Ghrelin and the larger the stomach pouch, chances are the more Ghrelin your stomach produces and this is the hormone that (a) makes your brain say "im hungry" and (b) is partially responsible for storing and making fat-cells.

So the combination of the above it seems is why such a small percentage of obese people can successfully lose huge amounts of weight and more importantly keep it off. A friend of my Mom's lost 50 kilo's (that's the better part of 100 lbs!) and the moment she stopped the extra-intense diet+exercise for a little bit, the fat just started piling back on, because that was her body fighting back. Biology is so weird!

(also yes, I type loooong posts, it's like my thing in life...)

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