AK8483

Post op food suggestions

17 posts in this topic

Hi!

Today is my first day of the stage 2 diet. Yay! I'm having a complete brain freeze on meal ideas. Also if I could please have feedback on how you felt 14 days post op...

Thanks so much!

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You should find some ideas here in this guide from one of the best hospitals in Boston:

https://www.tuftsmedicalcenter.org/~/media/Brochures/TuftsMC/Patient Care Services/Departments and Services/Weight and Wellness Center/GBP Diet Manual12611.ashx

I felt great 14 days out, except that I became tired in the afternoons. The surgery, and giving up caffeine, doubtlessly caused this. But it got much better after week three, and the weight loss was wonderful. 

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Thanks! I feel good, but I wasn't expecting to be hungry. 

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Ugh I am sorry you are hungry !  I hope they take all the grenlin out when I get my sleeve ..ls it true that some people are and some are not hungry so soon after surgery?

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Beth's (MiladyB) Surgeon's Updated Menu Plans are worth taking a look at:  

 

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8 hours ago, tracyringo said:

Ugh I am sorry you are hungry !  I hope they take all the grenlin out when I get my sleeve ..ls it true that some people are and some are not hungry so soon after surgery?

It is true that some (VSG and RNY) don't feel hunger early post-op.  I haven't felt hunger as I knew it since my RNY almost 10 years ago but I do know when I'm empty.  And if it isn't feeding time, I hit the fluids (especially hot tea) and that normally calms things down.

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46 minutes ago, cinwa said:

Beth's (MiladyB) Surgeon's Updated Menu Plans are worth taking a look at:  

 

Great set of menu plans from @MiladyB, and should help keep me on the straight and narrow path...

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9 hours ago, tracyringo said:

Ugh I am sorry you are hungry !  I hope they take all the grenlin out when I get my sleeve ..ls it true that some people are and some are not hungry so soon after surgery?

 

11 hours ago, AK8483 said:

Hi!

Today is my first day of the stage 2 diet. Yay! I'm having a complete brain freeze on meal ideas. Also if I could please have feedback on how you felt 14 days post op...

Thanks so much!

I rarely feel physiological hunger now... am careful to have something, even if it is only broth, every 2-3 hours in the stomach. I can go 8 hours but then I DO feel real hunger. 

@ 14 days, two things: a bit tired in the middle of the day, and LIGHTER. :D Was already exercising every day, did not need any nausea or powerful pain meds (just on a nonsteroidal then with the occasional acetominophen). 

Weight loss is essentially involuntary and totally easy right after surgery ... I was -16.5 pounds at 2 weeks. 

 

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9 hours ago, tracyringo said:

....... I hope they take all the grenlin out when I get my sleeve ..ls it true that some people are and some are not hungry so soon after surgery?

Some do feel hunger (or what they perceive to be hunger) early out Tracy.  I did not although I knew when I was empty.  But if it wasn't feeding time, I was advised to hit some warm tea or broth rather than eat and that was usually enough to get me through to my next feeding time.

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Posted (edited)

@AK8483, I didn't feel any hunger at all for the first couple of weeks, but on the third week I felt some hunger. Once I started solids, it went away again, but now I occasionally feel hungry if I'm late eating. I try to stick to a pretty strict schedule. I eat breakfast, then 4 1/2 hours later I have lunch. 5 hours later I have dinner. Then if I need it I have a snack in the evening. My job is full time stay at home grandmother :) and I deal with agoraphobia, so I don't get out of the house much. I have to admit, when I'm out, I don't really get hungry, even if I go off my schedule. It's when I'm home and have more time to think about food that it happens most. But one thing is constant...if I don't get enough water in early enough in the day, I'm definitely more hungry than if I'm fully hydrated. And I do deal with a lot of head hunger, but at least now I can tell the difference :) 

Edited by Trish1967
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Love the meal plans! Sounds like I need to stick to a schedule. Although I feel some hunger, I don't eat much..

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25 minutes ago, AK8483 said:

Love the meal plans! Sounds like I need to stick to a schedule. Although I feel some hunger, I don't eat much..

Sticking to a schedule really helps me. I don't eat much either...chicken, turkey, eggs, cheese, fish, chicken or egg salad, etc... I can eat up to 3 ounces of those foods. I tried a burger last night for the first time (no roll or condiments), and I could only tolerate 1.5 ounces because it's so much more dense than poultry. 

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I try to stick to a schedule too.

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3 hours ago, cinwa said:

Some do feel hunger (or what they perceive to be hunger) early out Tracy.  I did not although I knew when I was empty.  But if it wasn't feeding time, I was advised to hit some warm tea or broth rather than eat and that was usually enough to get me through to my next feeding time.

*or what they perceive to be hunger* I think is important to at least explore, even if you determine that's not what's going on in your particular case. 

I know it sounds super insulting to say "head hunger" to someone who is experiencing hunger, but for me, it was an important part of the process to understand what was going on in my guts and my head and reconcile the two. "Head hunger" sounds like you are hallucinating hunger or just have a craving, when it's more like your brain and stomach are used to eating more, so they actually go through the whole getting-digestion-going process when you think about food - they secrete the hormones, your guts start doing their thing, so you feel like you're hungry, when in fact your body doesn't actually need food. You have what you perceive to be hunger signals, but it's not because your stomach is hungry, per se. I learned that when my stomach growled it was actually my intestines doing whatever they do and it didn't mean I was actually hungry. I learned to ignore my intestines, basically, particularly as they are so very busy doing I have no idea what after surgery - very noisy. There's also that sort of gnawing feeling that I used to interpret as hunger that is probably actually stomach acid doing something useful, I assume. I drink a glass of water or have some tea and it goes away. What I've learned is to know when I'm actually hungry, as in my body needs food, and this took a few months of really listening. It includes symptoms such as feeling a bit light-headed or low on energy, or just really empty, not sure how to describe that. Basically, I think I've spent most of my life assuming I was hungry when there was something else going on with my system. Sugar, in fact, sets off all of these processes in me very rapidly - a chewy vitamin can do it (so I don't take chewy vitamins - I don't like having to convince myself it's not hunger).

Anyway, I don't want to imply that you're not hungry, as I'm not in your body, but it may be useful to at least think about the systems at work in your body. Here's a link to a video that helped me to think about this. I don't totally agree with his method of assessing hunger, but the information about my guts was helpful in getting me to assess hunger in my own case. 

 

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3 hours ago, Trish1967 said:

Sticking to a schedule really helps me. I don't eat much either...chicken, turkey, eggs, cheese, fish, chicken or egg salad, etc... I can eat up to 3 ounces of those foods. I tried a burger last night for the first time (no roll or condiments), and I could only tolerate 1.5 ounces because it's so much more dense than poultry. 

Very very helpful thanks everyone!

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@Jen581791, the lightheaded or low energy feeling is my cue to real hunger as well. I stopped listening to my stomach/intestinal growling a while ago. But I do get a lot of head hunger...it happens when I'm stressed out and used to eat for comfort. I could have just eaten, know that I'm physically full, then 10 minutes later feel like I've never eaten. I'm just thankful I can tell the difference now, because in the beginning, it's really difficult to know which is which. 

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3 hours ago, Jen581791 said:

*or what they perceive to be hunger* I think is important to at least explore, even if you determine that's not what's going on in your particular case. 

I know it sounds super insulting to say "head hunger" to someone who is experiencing hunger, but for me, it was an important part of the process to understand what was going on in my guts and my head and reconcile the two. "Head hunger" sounds like you are hallucinating hunger or just have a craving, when it's more like your brain and stomach are used to eating more, so they actually go through the whole getting-digestion-going process when you think about food - they secrete the hormones, your guts start doing their thing, so you feel like you're hungry, when in fact your body doesn't actually need food. You have what you perceive to be hunger signals, but it's not because your stomach is hungry, per se. I learned that when my stomach growled it was actually my intestines doing whatever they do and it didn't mean I was actually hungry. I learned to ignore my intestines, basically, particularly as they are so very busy doing I have no idea what after surgery - very noisy. There's also that sort of gnawing feeling that I used to interpret as hunger that is probably actually stomach acid doing something useful, I assume. I drink a glass of water or have some tea and it goes away. What I've learned is to know when I'm actually hungry, as in my body needs food, and this took a few months of really listening. It includes symptoms such as feeling a bit light-headed or low on energy, or just really empty, not sure how to describe that. Basically, I think I've spent most of my life assuming I was hungry when there was something else going on with my system. Sugar, in fact, sets off all of these processes in me very rapidly - a chewy vitamin can do it (so I don't take chewy vitamins - I don't like having to convince myself it's not hunger).

Anyway, I don't want to imply that you're not hungry, as I'm not in your body, but it may be useful to at least think about the systems at work in your body. Here's a link to a video that helped me to think about this. I don't totally agree with his method of assessing hunger, but the information about my guts was helpful in getting me to assess hunger in my own case. 

 

 I wish I could like this post more than once. I feel the exact same way. 

@AK8483It gets a little easier to navigate hunger once you get to know your "pouch" a little better. Some days I'm not hungry at all, some days my mouth and brain have cravings for all the food in the world. However, I've learned that much of that is my own learned behavior and I truly am not hungry. 

Congrats!

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