CherokeeGirl

Don't know about you, but I have to take one of these every day

12 posts in this topic

Are they prescribed or are they OTC?

Either way, I'd be inclined to print a copy of that article out and talk with your PCP or surgeon about it.

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Yeah, my surgeon has switched all of us from PPIs for a variety of reasons including risk of dementia and death. Goodbye omeprazole, hello famotidine. It's definitely worth talking to your surgeon about. Our bodies have multiple proton pumps, some of which we would not like to inhibit. Glad everyone is being careful and aware.

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No OVC not prescribed....if I miss even a day, I get heartburn so badly hot water comes up...just horrible

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The drugs in the famotidine class (H2 blockers: cimetidine, ranitidine, famotidine, etc) work pretty well, but perhaps not quite as well as the omeprazole class of drugs (proton-pump inhibitors). I took ranitidine for years and it worked fine for me.  Pepcid (famotidine) and Zantac (ranitidine) can be purchased over the counter. I had a distant relative who took a PPI and died of a rare complication - it wiped out his bone marrow and he died of infection. Famotidine has the advantage of no interactions with other drugs, so things like anticoagulants (warfarin) don't have to be adjusted. H2 blockers almost work quickly so if you have heartburn they work quickly. The PPI drugs take a while, so if you have heartburn you really need an antacid or something else while you wait for it to work. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H2_antagonist

One thing to be aware of is that the PPI drugs have been linked to an higher risk of bone fractures. Many of us with bypasses are at risk of fractures because of vitamin D and calcium issues to start with... so in that case it makes even more sense to try a H2 blocker drug like famotidine. 

 

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18 hours ago, BurgundyBoy said:

 

One thing to be aware of is that the PPI drugs have been linked to an higher risk of bone fractures. Many of us with bypasses are at risk of fractures because of vitamin D and calcium issues to start with... so in that case it makes even more sense to try a H2 blocker drug like famotidine. 

 

Bypasses shouldn't be needing PPIs. If they're prescribed they should be asking for a second opinion as to what is really going on in their bodies because bypass surgery is a cure for GERD. I know I was taking 2 PPIs daily (with no real effect) prior to surgery, but not a single tablet needed since.

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My program(me) prescribes PPIs for six months after bypass because of risks to the new pouch (incision lines healing etc.). Probably more of a precaution until things are healed up well (including any damage from GERD). I assume we will be stopping them after six months.

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That's interesting @Carina. I haven't taken any at all since surgery even though I was on maximum doses before. With RNY, because the acid enters the stomach below the staple line, it doesn't hit the intestines before the Y join. It was this realisation that gave me the light bulb moment as to why one of my surgeons said they don't do Omega Loop bypass (aka Mini Bypass)  on patients with prior GERD. Because the intestine isn't cut but rather just looped back up to the pouch, it is quite conceivable that the acid could cross through the join and back up into the stomach......for me that's a mystery solved.

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There's also newer research that links long term PPI use to a greater risk of dementia. PPI's weren't ever really intended for daily use - they're supposed to be used for 2-6 weeks in regards to healing ulcers and gastritis, and then stopped, but many docs prescribe them otherwise. 

Like with any med - only take it as long as you actually need it :)

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My programme had us take omeprazole (Prilosec) for 3-6 months post-op (I can't remember exactly).

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I believe I'll be on something for one month post-op.

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I've been prescribed omeprazole for 3 months post op. I just assumed it was preventative while my insides were healing. Now I'm worried...I think I'll call my surgeons office Monday :( 

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