Cadoddle

Pro-Opt Medical Tests

7 posts in this topic

I am curious as to the different tests your surgeon has ordered prior to the procedure? I am awaiting a surgery date still for the sleeve, and in the time frame I must have the following: EKG; sleep study; Echo cardiogram; Doppler on my legs; Chest/lung X-ray;some kind of esophageal scope to rule out ulcers; blood work; & urinalysis. I think that covers it (lol) except of course the meeting with the psychologist and 2 meetings with the nutritionist. I am 65 and have Medicare and a supplemental insurance policy. I have over 100 pounds to lose to be at a healthy weight. My extreme weight gain has come and gone over the last 12-15 years and I have successfully lost weight 3 times only to gain it back.  Unless I lose this weight I cannot expect to enjoy the rest of my life!! I am miserable and unable to be very active.  I have been recovering from 2 fractures in my pelvis area and have been on non-weight bearing restrictions for the last 3 months. I have finally decided that surgery is my answer for not only losing weight quickly but also to restrict me in the years to come.  I am so encouraged by the success stories I have read on this site and I am looking forward to joining in on the Loser Journey!!

 

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HI @Cadoddle - your lab work sounds pretty typical. Vertical sleeves can really exacerbate acid reflux so the esophageal scope is very useful. For example, my surgeon repaired my hiatal hernia at the same time I had my sleeve.

Surgery is not an easy path, but unlike dieting it actually works to get the weight off. I'm just shy of 3 months after surgery and beginning to focus on how to maintain my weight loss once I get to the maintenance phase. People who have had surgery before me emphasize building a new relationship to food during the "honeymoon" period (right after surgery) when weight loss is easy - to carry you forward after you get the excess weight off without regaining. There is a lot of focus on navigating the initial period but one thing I like about this forum is you can get insight into the long term too.

Sorry to hear about your pelvic fractures, they can really be very painful. 

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48 minutes ago, Cadoddle said:

I am curious as to the different tests your surgeon has ordered prior to the procedure? I am awaiting a surgery date still for the sleeve, and in the time frame I must have the following: EKG; sleep study; Echo cardiogram; Doppler on my legs; Chest/lung X-ray;some kind of esophageal scope to rule out ulcers; blood work; & urinalysis. I think that covers it (lol) except of course the meeting with the psychologist and 2 meetings with the nutritionist. I am 65 and have Medicare and a supplemental insurance policy. I have over 100 pounds to lose to be at a healthy weight. My extreme weight gain has come and gone over the last 12-15 years and I have successfully lost weight 3 times only to gain it back.  Unless I lose this weight I cannot expect to enjoy the rest of my life!! I am miserable and unable to be very active.  I have been recovering from 2 fractures in my pelvis area and have been on non-weight bearing restrictions for the last 3 months. I have finally decided that surgery is my answer for not only losing weight quickly but also to restrict me in the years to come.  I am so encouraged by the success stories I have read on this site and I am looking forward to joining in on the Loser Journey!!

 

As part of my insurance requirements, I had to complete 6, consecutive visits with a Dr where I was weighed ("supervised" physician weight loss attempt). I am coming up on my 5th visit in a couple weeks. I also had to see a psychologist or psychiatrist to verify that I was mentally prepared for WLS, and had to have one visit with a nutritionist. 

Additionally, my surgeon had a whole gamut of labs done, requiring 17 tubes of blood all in all, required me to get an ultrasound of my liver. 

THEN, my PCP had me do an EKG, and is having me do a bone density scan next week, to have as a baseline to compare after WLS.

I checked off a good part of the list pretty quickly, in a couple months. I only have the two visits left before the surgeon's office submits it all to the insurance company, at the end of July.  

I highly recommend that you try not to get discouraged by the seeming mountain of pre-op requirements. Most of it is needed for your own protection and good.  :-)

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Hi Cadoddle, welcome to TTF. Lots of tests seems to be part of the deal - making sure we make it through surgery healthy and sound. But they're no fun :( They'll be ticked off your list before you know it, though. 

It sounds like you have lots of good motivating factors to help you be successful. Keep your eyes on the prize! Looking forward to seeing you on the losers bench.

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Your list of tests seems pretty standard. Many are standard for any surgical procedure, while the endoscopy is standard for WLS. I didn't have to go through many of these as I had a fairly low BMI, but I did have two endoscopies (12 months apart), a barium swallow test that was after the first endoscopy, plus a CT Scan of the abdomen and pelvis. I also had the standard raft of blood tests and an EKG during my pre-op testing at the hospital. These were pretty specific to my situation that required revision. At one stage the surgeon was suggesting I'd need an exploratory laproscopic exam and an esophageal manometry test. Fortunately he decided that the results of these tests wouldn't change the need for surgery, so he changed his mind about them.

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Thanks to you all for your responses.  I am more willing to be patient knowing these are ordinary procedures. I think part of my problem is the publicity some doctors have received abusing the Medicare system with unnecessary test preformed on "the elderly" of which I refuse to be labeled as!! Last night I had a practically sleepless night during my sleep study. The technician had very good regard for the surgeon and convinced me of the need for the test. Can you believe that 8 out of 10 obese men and 4 out of 10 obese women have sleep apnea. I usually fall asleep easily but not last night. What a night!!!  I came home and slept for 3 hours extra!! @BurgundyBoy, I am good at losing weight but my relationship with food has to be tamed in order for me to keep the weight off. I am very aware of how much I need to train my thinking. @Michael_A, medicare requirements are similar to your insurance.  First a BMI of over 40, plus a weight related diagnosis of 2 other illness (diabetes, heart condition, etc)  OR a 6 month recorded history with a doctor assisting you with a weight loss program. After providing the medical office with these stats from my primary care doctor, I was approved for surgery and then began the process for the testing for the surgeon. You have all made me feel confident that I am on the right track. That is a great feeling compared to the feeling of hopelessness I felt before considering weight loss surgery.

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29 minutes ago, Cadoddle said:

Thanks to you all for your responses.  I am more willing to be patient knowing these are ordinary procedures. I think part of my problem is the publicity some doctors have received abusing the Medicare system with unnecessary test preformed on "the elderly" of which I refuse to be labeled as!! Last night I had a practically sleepless night during my sleep study. The technician had very good regard for the surgeon and convinced me of the need for the test. Can you believe that 8 out of 10 obese men and 4 out of 10 obese women have sleep apnea. I usually fall asleep easily but not last night. What a night!!!  I came home and slept for 3 hours extra!! @BurgundyBoy, I am good at losing weight but my relationship with food has to be tamed in order for me to keep the weight off. I am very aware of how much I need to train my thinking. @Michael_A, medicare requirements are similar to your insurance.  First a BMI of over 40, plus a weight related diagnosis of 2 other illness (diabetes, heart condition, etc)  OR a 6 month recorded history with a doctor assisting you with a weight loss program. After providing the medical office with these stats from my primary care doctor, I was approved for surgery and then began the process for the testing for the surgeon. You have all made me feel confident that I am on the right track. That is a great feeling compared to the feeling of hopelessness I felt before considering weight loss surgery.

Same pre-requirements here- BMI over 40, and one of a few comorbidities. In my case, type 2 diabetes and sleep apnea. My PCP referred me to the sleep Dr. last year and I had to have the sleep study, and got a CPAP machine. I was able to talk them into letting me do the home study though, and it was STILL a fairly sleepless night! I totally sympathize with you.

It sounds like you have found some clarity regarding your decision for WLS, ans I am so happy for you!

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