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tmcgee

So why are the early days so difficult?

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I don't know the source for this, and the information is invaluable!

 

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Yep that's me right now and kicked in at exactly two weeks post-op. Really hoping there is only another week left before things pick up again because I really can't afford to be spending most of my days curled up doing nothing.

tmcgee and Cadoddle like this

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What a nice way of explaining exactly how I felt several weeks after surgery! I thought it was depression at the time, but this makes a lot of sense. 

In case anyone who's at that stage is worried, I have so much more energy now than I did before surgery! The hibernation didn't last too long, but it did feel like a long time. Power through it with naps, I guess, like a bear or a squirrel.

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This is so spot on.  I'm 3 weeks postop and starting to feel like myself again. I think those weeks before and directly after the surgery I had to grieve the end of food as I once knew it.  I still miss food, but I simply can't go to it for comfort or celebration. Now the hard work starts: fixing the parts of my life that cause stress that I used to avoid with a binge.  

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No.  It sounds good in theory, but I cannot find any supporting documentation on this.

Why do we always have to have some special diagnosis, some medical reason for grieving instead of accepting that feeling bad is part of the process? What is it with this delicate flower, I'm-so-unique, nobody-understands-me mindset that so many of us bring to the party? I'm sorry; post-surgical depression is common and not just for bariatric patients. Can't it just be that we had major surgery, our bodies are still tired and healing, we came a long way to get here and are now feeling a little let down after the process (like after the holidays)? Could we miss the immediate comfort large amounts of food gave us? Do we have buyer's remorse when we realize the changes to our bodies are permanent and large quantities are off the table for good?

This reminds me also that there is no medical basis for the "Hormones Theory" I see so many people talking about. Our bodies are designed to eliminate excess hormones so if we are losing weight, the hormones stored in fat that affect our mood will actually level out and this will make us feel better, not worse. I can find no research that backs the claim that our change in digestive hormones changes our mood.

Would it be so bad to deal with the emotions that got us morbidly obese in the first place? Then maybe we wouldn't have to switch addictions at the alarming rate we seem to after surgery.

Every party has a pooper. That's why you invited me.

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2 hours ago, slars04 said:

No.  It sounds good in theory, but I cannot find any supporting documentation on this.

Why do we always have to have some special diagnosis, some medical reason for grieving instead of accepting that feeling bad is part of the process? What is it with this delicate flower, I'm-so-unique, nobody-understands-me mindset that so many of us bring to the party? I'm sorry; post-surgical depression is common and not just for bariatric patients. Can't it just be that we had major surgery, our bodies are still tired and healing, we came a long way to get here and are now feeling a little let down after the process (like after the holidays)? Could we miss the immediate comfort large amounts of food gave us? Do we have buyer's remorse when we realize the changes to our bodies are permanent and large quantities are off the table for good?

This reminds me also that there is no medical basis for the "Hormones Theory" I see so many people talking about. Our bodies are designed to eliminate excess hormones so if we are losing weight, the hormones stored in fat that affect our mood will actually level out and this will make us feel better, not worse. I can find no research that backs the claim that our change in digestive hormones changes our mood.

Would it be so bad to deal with the emotions that got us morbidly obese in the first place? Then maybe we wouldn't have to switch addictions at the alarming rate we seem to after surgery.

Every party has a pooper. That's why you invited me.

It's something to think about, and that's the reason I posted it. I have no idea if it applies to anyone here or not. The one thing I do know is that we all think about things in a different way after surgery. shifting addictions? Im not, and I know it does happen to some folks.

 

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On 5/25/2017 at 7:15 PM, Aussie H said:

Yep that's me right now and kicked in at exactly two weeks post-op. Really hoping there is only another week left before things pick up again because I really can't afford to be spending most of my days curled up doing nothing.

I hope you can get yourself through this yucky time!! I am impressed that you are opening up with your feelings instead of total isolation!! 

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2 hours ago, Cadoddle said:

I hope you can get yourself through this yucky time!! I am impressed that you are opening up with your feelings instead of total isolation!! 

I'm feeling a bit better every day now thanks. I was so busy immediately post-op, plus had a huge revisional surgery, and needed to give myself more time to rest. I've had no problems at all with my actual surgical procedure, which I'm extremely grateful for, just really still need to take it a bit easier later in the day. I had a lot of scarring and adhesions to be either removed or taken down, and a fair portion of the omentum excised due to damage from prior surgeries. I didn't really factor any of that into my recovery because I felt so good after my surgery. We live and learn.

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On 5/30/2017 at 7:48 PM, slars04 said:

No.  It sounds good in theory, but I cannot find any supporting documentation on this.

Why do we always have to have some special diagnosis, some medical reason for grieving instead of accepting that feeling bad is part of the process? What is it with this delicate flower, I'm-so-unique, nobody-understands-me mindset that so many of us bring to the party? I'm sorry; post-surgical depression is common and not just for bariatric patients. Can't it just be that we had major surgery, our bodies are still tired and healing, we came a long way to get here and are now feeling a little let down after the process (like after the holidays)? Could we miss the immediate comfort large amounts of food gave us? Do we have buyer's remorse when we realize the changes to our bodies are permanent and large quantities are off the table for good?

This reminds me also that there is no medical basis for the "Hormones Theory" I see so many people talking about. Our bodies are designed to eliminate excess hormones so if we are losing weight, the hormones stored in fat that affect our mood will actually level out and this will make us feel better, not worse. I can find no research that backs the claim that our change in digestive hormones changes our mood.

Would it be so bad to deal with the emotions that got us morbidly obese in the first place? Then maybe we wouldn't have to switch addictions at the alarming rate we seem to after surgery.

Every party has a pooper. That's why you invited me.

@slars04!! Deal with our emotions that got us morbidly obese in the first place??!! You must be joking!! Not that!! Better to put everything on some post-surgery physiological change than admit our heads were in the wrong place!! ^_^

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For me it was also the loss of animal protein. I would not eat any pureed meat because it's gross. It wasn't until I could get animal protein back in my diet that I felt like a real human being again. 

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1 hour ago, lightenupwoman said:

For me it was also the loss of animal protein. I would not eat any pureed meat because it's gross. It wasn't until I could get animal protein back in my diet that I felt like a real human being again. 

So are you Paleo now?

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On ‎5‎/‎30‎/‎2017 at 7:48 PM, slars04 said:

No.  It sounds good in theory, but I cannot find any supporting documentation on this.

Why do we always have to have some special diagnosis, some medical reason for grieving instead of accepting that feeling bad is part of the process? What is it with this delicate flower, I'm-so-unique, nobody-understands-me mindset that so many of us bring to the party? I'm sorry; post-surgical depression is common and not just for bariatric patients. Can't it just be that we had major surgery, our bodies are still tired and healing, we came a long way to get here and are now feeling a little let down after the process (like after the holidays)? Could we miss the immediate comfort large amounts of food gave us? Do we have buyer's remorse when we realize the changes to our bodies are permanent and large quantities are off the table for good?

This reminds me also that there is no medical basis for the "Hormones Theory" I see so many people talking about. Our bodies are designed to eliminate excess hormones so if we are losing weight, the hormones stored in fat that affect our mood will actually level out and this will make us feel better, not worse. I can find no research that backs the claim that our change in digestive hormones changes our mood.

Would it be so bad to deal with the emotions that got us morbidly obese in the first place? Then maybe we wouldn't have to switch addictions at the alarming rate we seem to after surgery.

Every party has a pooper. That's why you invited me.

You are so right on this. I went to a spectacular dinner party last night for a friend - of course could only eat a little here and there, but the point was the wonderful people there - and after dinner the owner of the restaurant talked to me for half an hour about WLS, which he could benefit from. He zeroed right in on the emotional eating he does - a very self=aware person. I'm going to talk to him again soon...

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