mikef

RNY - Catheter ?

19 posts in this topic

Is a catheter required with RNY?  What about a drain tube?

Neither of these is required with the sleeve (VSG). But I wasn't sure about RNY. Thank you. 

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I had both a catheter for a day in hospital and came home with a drain but I had my surgery over 9 1/2 years ago and also had a large umbilical hernia repaired at the same time so that might account for the drain.

Neither were a problem for me.

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I don't know if I had a catheter or not (none when I went under, none when I woke up, didn't feel funny, so I suppose not?). I had a drain tube coming out right below the bottom of my breastbone, and although it wasn't pretty (goo coming out of my body into a receptacle? ew), it wasn't a big deal, and getting it removed at my first post-op check-up wasn't a big deal, either. 

Here's my blog post from three days after surgery, if you'd like a little flashback into that window of time. 

 

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I had a catheter put in after I was put under and removed the day after my surgery. This was used to measure fluid output after surgery. Believe me it's a benefit to not have to get your sore body out of bed for a pee on the first night. No drain.

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Posted (edited)

I didn't have either one. I think it's one of those things that varies.

Edited by athenarose

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I am not aware of a cath.  No drain here.

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Posted (edited)

I had a catheter for about 18 hours and a JP drain for about 48. My doc wanted the drain out prior to discharge, and it was. I went in on a Monday and was out Wednesday night. My surgery was supposed to be in the AM and got pushed back to 3 PM. He had me up and moving the next morning, walking the halls. I tried to get out of there Tuesday, but he was adamant that I stay another day to assure I had no leakage or other issues.

Edited by slars04

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Same as Aussie

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15 hours ago, mikef said:

Is a catheter required with RNY?  What about a drain tube?

Neither of these is required with the sleeve (VSG). But I wasn't sure about RNY. Thank you. 

Does it really matter in the scheme of things? Having read a few of your posts here I'm concerned that you are focussing your decision making on such short term comfort issues (and in this case on stuff that varies between surgeon's anyway), rather than on the bigger, longer term ones which to me were far more important. Ask yourself what weight your personal discomfort about having a catheter or drain inserted should hold over eg. the very real likelihood of exacerbating an already existing reflux issue. How much weight will you put on the very real possibility of having to have a revisional surgery which comes with multiple times more risk than a first weightloss surgery. 

There are times when I just don't understand why some patients torture themselves getting answers to certain questions that they will then just fret over, let alone allow those things to cloud the very import decision regarding choice of surgery. I considered myself well researched on the procedure I was about to face as it would affect me long term. I didn't ask certain questions about procedural matters because those were things for my surgeons and the anesthecist to worry about....not me. In fact I stopped the anesthecist from continuing her explanation of what would happen at surgery time as soon as she got to the part where I was out to it. While surprised she said she wished more patients would do the same, because so many worry unnecessarily about things they wouldn't even know about if they didn't ask. Perhaps I'm just lucky in that I had absolute trust in my surgeon and therefore in every decision he made for my benefit both prior to and during my surgery. I had been in his very capable and professional hands under anesthesia twice before. If you can't have faith in your surgeon making medical decisions that they believe are best for you, then maybe think about changing surgeons.

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Posted (edited)

18 minutes ago, Aussie H said:

Does it really matter in the scheme of things? Having read a few of your posts here I'm concerned that you are focussing your decision making on such short term comfort issues (and in this case on stuff that varies between surgeon's anyway), rather than on the bigger, longer term ones which to me were far more important. Ask yourself what weight your personal discomfort about having a catheter or drain inserted should hold over eg. the very real likelihood of exacerbating an already existing reflux issue. How much weight will you put on the very real possibility of having to have a revisional surgery which comes with multiple times more risk than a first weightloss surgery. 

There are times when I just don't understand why some patients torture themselves getting answers to certain questions that they will then just fret over, let alone allow those things to cloud the very import decision regarding choice of surgery. I considered myself well researched on the procedure I was about to face as it would affect me long term. I didn't ask certain questions about procedural matters because those were things for my surgeons and the anesthecist to worry about....not me. In fact I stopped the anesthecist from continuing her explanation of what would happen at surgery time as soon as she got to the part where I was out to it. While surprised she said she wished more patients would do the same, because so many worry unnecessarily about things they wouldn't even know about if they didn't ask. Perhaps I'm just lucky in that I had absolute trust in my surgeon and therefore in every decision he made for my benefit both prior to and during my surgery. I had been in his very capable and professional hands under anesthesia twice before. If you can't have faith in your surgeon making medical decisions that they believe are best for you, then maybe think about changing surgeons.

I can't speak for the OP, but I know that, for me personally, knowing more information actually helps me feel less stressed and, in the case of something as major as WLS, I needed all the stress reduction I could get.  While you're right, it doesn't matter in the grand scheme of things, little details like whether I'd have a drain did matter to me because uncertainty is extremely stressful for me, and, with any surgery, there are so many potential unknowns that I appreciated all the knowledge I could get beforehand. Everyone is different and, what may seem like info overload or unnecessary info to one person may help someone else feel more at ease.  I had faith in my surgeon, but I wanted to find out as much info as I could before my meetings with her so that time could be more productive.  And frankly, I question everything and my doctors (and my kids' doctors) love it.  They appreciate that I'm willing to ask hard questions, challenge them on standard protocol and thoughtfully discuss things. For example, I trusted my ob-gyn, but I absolutely refused to induce using cytotec (his usual induction method). We discussed it, I cited medical studies for my reasoning and we decided on an alternative plan.  Even the best doctors are human and trusting them doesn't mean blindly following protocol without asking questions, regardless of how "unnecessary" some may deem the information.  Just my thoughts. :)

Edited by athenarose
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I completely appreciate your point of view athenarose. I guess where I'm coming from is those that'll themselves get so scared by procedural stuff eg intubation, strapping to the table, gowns on vs off etc, that they can't overcome their fears. We've all seen it here and on other forums before. I certainly knew as much as I could about the actual procedure as well as post-op care etc. These things we can to a degree control or at least need to know. It's the things we can't control, that have the potential to stress us, that are perhaps best left in the knowledge base of the professionals who are doing their jobs, with their professional approach, instead of potentially spiralling out of control in the mind of an already stressed patient.

I took what I'd describe as a very Zen approach to my surgery this time around, and boy it made a difference. I couldn't believe how calm I was right up until the time I was knocked out. The most stressful thing was choosing the playlist of music they used in theatre during my surgery.

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No drain.  I did have a catheter, but it was taken out shortly after I woke up from surgery.  No big deal.  

I suggest that you get the best possible surgeon, even if this means longer trips to another hospital, and then place yourself in their hands.

Did I worry about the surgery - yes.  But I worried a lot more about dying prematurely of a heart attack or stroke if I did not lose my excess 125 pounds.

Gastric bypass is a lifelong surgery that will allow you to regain control of your weight, your ability to lead an active lifestyle, and most importantly your health. I have no regrets in having it, except that I waited too long to have it. The discomfort of the pre surgery diet and of the recovery from surgery are trivial compared to the joy that I now have in being healthy, thin and active.  :)

Aussie H, cinwa, Jen581791 and 1 other like this

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8 hours ago, athenarose said:

I can't speak for the OP, but I know that, for me personally, knowing more information actually helps me feel less stressed and, in the case of something as major as WLS, I needed all the stress reduction I could get.  While you're right, it doesn't matter in the grand scheme of things, little details like whether I'd have a drain did matter to me because uncertainty is extremely stressful for me, and, with any surgery, there are so many potential unknowns that I appreciated all the knowledge I could get beforehand. Everyone is different and, what may seem like info overload or unnecessary info to one person may help someone else feel more at ease.  I had faith in my surgeon, but I wanted to find out as much info as I could before my meetings with her so that time could be more productive.  And frankly, I question everything and my doctors (and my kids' doctors) love it.  They appreciate that I'm willing to ask hard questions, challenge them on standard protocol and thoughtfully discuss things. For example, I trusted my ob-gyn, but I absolutely refused to induce using cytotec (his usual induction method). We discussed it, I cited medical studies for my reasoning and we decided on an alternative plan.  Even the best doctors are human and trusting them doesn't mean blindly following protocol without asking questions, regardless of how "unnecessary" some may deem the information.  Just my thoughts. :)

Yes. This is how it is for me. I haven't had my apointment yet with the surgeon of my choice. I have met with my back up surgeon. I just want to go into this fully knowing what to expect. I am having a hard time deciding between the sleeve and bypass. So little details matter to me. It's almost a coin toss. 

But I will not have a catheter. Not worried about the pain as I know there is none. But I can't deal with the thought of that. Sorry if you don't understand. But I just can't do it no matter what. Even if it means no surgery. 

I know my surgeon of chouce does not require a catheter for the sleeve. I was just wondering about the bypass before my appointment next Tuesday. I have researched every detail of the sleeve. But now I am looking at RNY.  

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Dear mikef,

I'm also a guy (assuming you are too by your reluctance to have a catheter) who would have been reluctant to have one. In past surgery I've had one and it was no big deal. They insert them while you are out and they don't hurt. My reluctance had to do with the small risk of urinary tract infection. 

I have a big prostate and some of the medications used increase urinary retention. When I was in hospital they were concerned about my low urine flow after surgery, and did an ultrasound - and indeed I had urinary retention. I persuaded the team to just stop the retention-causing meds and did fine without one. With just a bit of time the retention ended. Had my retention persisted I would have been the first to ask for one - it hurts. 

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11 minutes ago, BurgundyBoy said:

I'm also a guy (assuming you are too by your reluctance to have a catheter) who would have been reluctant to have one.

It's not only the guys who'd rather not. :D

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Here is a long TTF posting on catheters. 

 

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Fair enough! Never met anyone who LIKED having a catheter! They fall under the category of "sometimes necessary evil" - and I sure did my best to avoid one. 

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I had a catheter for VSG as well as numerous other surgeries. I don't mind them and I've never had a problem with them. I suppose it depends on your surgeon and hospital. If you don't want one, tell your dr and perhaps they will opt to not use one if that was part of their original plan.

Only drains I've ever had were for my tummy tuck. Didn't really like them but it wasn't that big of deal. As long as you keep them pinned to your clothing they won't move much and are less likely to get caught on things. If you need to shower with drains, I recommend wearing a lanyard around your neck and pinning or clipping them to the lanyard. Or, you could have someone in the shower with you holding them up for you. That would work too. 

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7 hours ago, Res Ipsa said:

Did I worry about the surgery - yes.  But I worried a lot more about dying prematurely of a heart attack or stroke if I did not lose my excess 125 pounds.

Gastric bypass is a lifelong surgery that will allow you to regain control of your weight, your ability to lead an active lifestyle, and most importantly your health. I have no regrets in having it, except that I waited too long to have it. The discomfort of the pre surgery diet and of the recovery from surgery are trivial compared to the joy that I now have in being healthy, thin and active.  :)

Again - Res Ipsa is spot on! The pain and discomfort are fleeting and a distant memory. And, I cannot find the words to accurately describe how much more I like my life post WLS.

 

Regarding fear, pre-op I read 7 or 8 books about WLS. I spent countless hours combing this site. I had a list of questions for my surgeon that  was so long it made the blood drain from her face. I started the process, stopped it, gained 10 pounds the following month and then re-started. Now I know most of my fear was just my food addiction talking. WLS was the best decision I ever made. I am very thankful that despite all my fears, I kept moving forward towards the operating table. 

 

 

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