Renatapaz1984

Not excited at all

8 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

Hi everyone!!! I'm very happy to have found this forum because believe it or not, I felt a little bit intimidated with my doctor's former patient's group support. I don't know why. But I feel that everyone is like judging you even though they don't say it. Lol! Maybe it's me just going through a stage. 

Anyway. I just wanted to know if anyone didn't feel any excitement after getting sleeved. I am right now in the full liquids diet and I've been ok. I still had some chicken noodle soup with the noodles and the soft cooked carrots. I honestly needed to chew. Then afterwards I felt guilty because it said in the PostOp guide that we shouldn't eat with chunks, but I chew them until I made them puree LOL! I've lost in total  with Pre Op diet 18 lbs!! That's a lot. But I still don't feel the excitement of it. Is this normal? 

Thanks to everyone!! 

Edited by Renatapaz1984

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I felt a lot of emotions after my surgery, but I can honestly say that excitement was not one of them. Self doubt, frustration, overwhelm, apprehension, but no excitement. I totally understand the urge to want to chew. I would put protein powder in my yogurt and chew just to try to fill that need (yeah...it didn't really work).  Putting on my "been there, got past it" hat (which absolutely no judgment intended), you really need to follow your diet. Your sleeve is still healing and you don't want to risk damaging it right now. It sounds awful (and I might get flamed for this), but if you really need to chew something, then chew and spit it out. Don't risk hurting yourself right now. I approached my post-op diet like a nearly recovering addict- one day at a time, one hour at a time, sometimes one minute at a time. I literally had a calendar marked with the date I moved on to each phase and marked off each day. That liquid only post-op phase is really hard mentally, but it's only for a time.  Take care of yourself and find some coping mechanisms to try to distract you from the head hunger and urges.  Sleep, showers, reading, whatever keeps your mind & body occupied. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think I felt very excited until I got some energy back...

You can always chew ice chips and sugar free popsicles, as well. Liquids phase is long and boring, for sure, but best to follow it. I specifically asked my surgeon what might actually hurt me, and he said nothing I could do physically would probably hurt me (lifting, twisting, sleeping on my stomach, etc), but only eating something I shouldn't too early. He had some horror story of a patient getting back to the hotel from the hospital (in Mexico so hotel not home) and ordering pizza. ER visit, more operations, two weeks in hospital. Not sure if it was a real story or a scare story, but it helped me keep that in mind ;) 

Trish1967 likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, athenarose said:

I felt a lot of emotions after my surgery, but I can honestly say that excitement was not one of them. Self doubt, frustration, overwhelm, apprehension, but no excitement. I totally understand the urge to want to chew. I would put protein powder in my yogurt and chew just to try to fill that need (yeah...it didn't really work).  Putting on my "been there, got past it" hat (which absolutely no judgment intended), you really need to follow your diet. Your sleeve is still healing and you don't want to risk damaging it right now. It sounds awful (and I might get flamed for this), but if you really need to chew something, then chew and spit it out. Don't risk hurting yourself right now. I approached my post-op diet like a nearly recovering addict- one day at a time, one hour at a time, sometimes one minute at a time. I literally had a calendar marked with the date I moved on to each phase and marked off each day. That liquid only post-op phase is really hard mentally, but it's only for a time.  Take care of yourself and find some coping mechanisms to try to distract you from the head hunger and urges.  Sleep, showers, reading, whatever keeps your mind & body occupied. 

I think that you are totally right. You kind of shaked me. Yes this stage is sooo boring and I come from a Foodie family. So everyone loves to eat, but WAS the only one with no control of it. And they have to keep living their lives. I can't force them to eat what I'm eating, but they have been really nice to me. And very understanding. I will follow as you are saying and thank you very much for posting back! 

athenarose and Trish1967 like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, one way to make this period more tolerable is to use your Foodie Family knowledge.... think of some super smoothie flavors, maybe something VERY offbeat... and give it a shot!  Like athenarose suggests, I have chewed solids and then spit it out - just to have the mouth texture. 

Your family may support you but only you can do the hard lifting that is this post-surgery stuff. I'm only about a month post-sleeve and it's clear my family is delighted for me and tries to be helpful... but the hard work is the hard work. I've had to be persistent about what kind of restaurant we can go to, and it is still a bit shocking to them (and to me.... ) how little I can eat at one go. Plus, there is no way I can eat anything that isn't either liquid or very soft right now. But wow, the clothes fit better and my joints are better and... [the list goes on]

Trish1967 likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, athenarose said:

 I would put protein powder in my yogurt and chew just to try to fill that need (yeah...it didn't really work).

Lol, you should see me chewing my applesauce! :D

i like your "one day/hour/minute at a time" approach. I think that's how I'm doing it. Doesn't stop me from lusting after Mr. Carina's crusty-whole-wheat-roll-with-cheese lunch, but it does help me deal with it. 

Trish1967 and athenarose like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dear Renatapaz1984, I was just re-reading your post and noticed you said (perhaps I am wrong) that only you did not have the self control that the other members of your family had. Well, that may be part of it, but the science is that a lot of the "control" issue is out of our hands. 

We didn't get heavy and stay heavy because we lacked discipline. Almost everyone here has lost hundreds of pounds, which is REALLY REALLY HARD. The science is that our bodies will do anything to keep our weights up - deliver terrible hunger to us, turn our metabolic rates down, etc. These survival mechanisms must have been great when we were hunter-gatherers but are not helpful in the modern age. 

So I hope you are not beating yourself up on that score. It takes courage to have an operation and to accept the lifestyle changes, and perseverance.

There is a woman who had a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass about a decade ago in my post-op group, and she is a real hoot to listen to when she describes going to restaurants. She eats out 5-6 times a week with her friends and remains trim and thin. She just follows the rules. She clearly lives in a "foodie" world and, well, just eats less than she used to. I'm hoping that's where I end up.

Good luck!

Hotmamatime, NerdyLady and LeeC like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, BurgundyBoy said:

Dear Renatapaz1984, I was just re-reading your post and noticed you said (perhaps I am wrong) that only you did not have the self control that the other members of your family had. Well, that may be part of it, but the science is that a lot of the "control" issue is out of our hands. 

We didn't get heavy and stay heavy because we lacked discipline. Almost everyone here has lost hundreds of pounds, which is REALLY REALLY HARD. The science is that our bodies will do anything to keep our weights up - deliver terrible hunger to us, turn our metabolic rates down, etc. These survival mechanisms must have been great when we were hunter-gatherers but are not helpful in the modern age. 

So I hope you are not beating yourself up on that score. It takes courage to have an operation and to accept the lifestyle changes, and perseverance.

There is a woman who had a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass about a decade ago in my post-op group, and she is a real hoot to listen to when she describes going to restaurants. She eats out 5-6 times a week with her friends and remains trim and thin. She just follows the rules. She clearly lives in a "foodie" world and, well, just eats less than she used to. I'm hoping that's where I end up.

Good luck!

Thank you for your post. I loved it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now