DaniLiz

Vitamins and More!

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I am 3 months post op, and this is hard work. Forget monitoring food, but my medications and my multis, the B's and the calcium!!! I'm also having soo much trouble with the drinking and not eating some days. Does anyone have an app or method they use to make this easier? Or a way for me to take less vitamins that contain all I need?

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The advice I was given was to take my supplements with my meals and choose a multivitamin that did not contain iron so that I could take my multivitamin and calcium together (calcium can inhibit iron absorption).

This is my basic schedule:

AM (breakfast):  multivitamin, calcium citrate.

Midday (lunch):  calcium citrate, B complex.

Early Evening (dinner):  multivitamin, calcium citrate.

1/2 hour or so before Bed:  Iron + vitamin C to aid absorption.

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Do you take a lot of calcium? Or is this a lower dosage?

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My programme recommended the ASMBS Guidelines of 3 x 500mg of calcium citrate (with D3).  

Table 5 of this document outlines our requirements depending our what surgery we had:  ASMBS Allied Health Nutritional Guidelines for the Surgical Weight Loss Patient.

The ASMBS is the body responsible for the Bariatric Centers of Excellence (ASMBS BSCOE) program.

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My program is also in a BSCOE hospital. No mention of calcium yet; they may be waiting for the first blood results. I'll ask.

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26 minutes ago, Carina said:

My program is also in a BSCOE hospital. No mention of calcium yet; they may be waiting for the first blood results. I'll ask.

This is a thread I started a few years ago.  It's something everyone (men and women) need to take notice of:  Osteopenia/Osteoporosis - Think you're safe? Well, think again! UPDATED!

I've posted many times about getting a DEXA/DXA (bone density) scan.  

And I'm going to tell you why.

First - I exercise every day, I have never skipped a beat with getting in my multivitamins and additional 1,500 mg/day calcium citrate, I also take extra vitamin D3 because vitamin D promotes calcium absorption in the gut - especially important for gastric bypass patients and I drink milk/eat cottage cheese and/or yogurt at least twice a day.

In September 2009, I posted the excellent results of a DEXA scan.  My "T" score (1.3) compared my bone mineral density with the optimum bone density of a 30 year old woman.  Not bad as I was 53 at the time.  My "Z" score was 3.1 - again, outstanding for what's normally expected for someone of my age, sex, weight, and ethnic or racial origin.

I had another DEXA (hip and spine) scan on Thursday.  Yesterday afternoon I got a call telling me that there was concern about my results.  

Unfortunately, the caller would not tell me what, just that I would need to speak with my PCP and that couldn't happen until Monday afternoon. 

At this stage, I don't know whether we're talking about osteopenia (early signs of bone loss that can turn into osteoporosis) or whether it's full blown osteoporosis.  I'll report back on Monday.

But this is a warning to all.  There are studies going back years that indicate that gastric bypass surgery leads to an increase in bone turnover and a decrease in bone mass.

2009:  The Decline in Hip Bone Density after Gastric Bypass Surgery Is Associated with Extent of Weight Loss:  Conclusions: After Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, there was evidence of calcium and vitamin D malabsorption. Bone turnover increased, and hip bone density rapidly declined. The decline in hip BMD was strongly associated with weight loss itself. Vigilance for nutritional deficiencies and bone loss in patients both before and after bariatric surgery is crucial.

A 2004 study that showed "Bone mineral density decreased significantly at the total hip (7.8 +/- 4.8%; P < 0.001), trochanter (9.3 +/- 5.7%; P < 0.001), and total body (1.6 +/- 2.0%; P < 0.05), with significant decreases in bone mineral content at these sites. In summary, within 3 to 9 months after LRGB, morbidly obese patients have an increase in bone resorption associated with a decrease in bone mass.".   http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15001587

You have to be proactive and get those DEXA/DXA scans done.

And to the guys - THAT MEANS YOU TOO!  Osteoporosis isn't just for women.

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Thanks!

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If you work in an office setting, you will find that it makes life much easier to keep sets of your vitamins at home and at work. That way you do not need to carry vitamins with you when you commute to and from work. 

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