Imagine Blue Skies

1 Year Post Op and Nervous

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I'm new here and just wanted to get started with finding others who have been through this process.  I chose to have surgery because I watched my mother die of diabetes, and didn't want to repeat her downfall. I was on insulin, had high cholesterol, a fatty liver, and pain in all my joints.  I'm almost exactly 1 year post op and have reached and exceeded my weight loss goal, am no longer on any diabetes meds, my liver enzymes are normal, my cholesterol is normal, and my knees don't hurt.  So why am I nervous?  

I've been reading a lot of posts and realize I'm in the "honeymoon" phase.  I'm frightened about what happens after the honeymoon ends, and want to find ways to prepare myself should the weight start to come back.  Any sage advice?

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Welcome to Thinner Times Imagine Blue Skies and congratulations on your weight loss - you have done a great job with your sleeve.

If you continue to follow the eating plan that got you to your goal, it should keep you there.  Personally, the only thing I avoid is starchy carbs, candy/chocolate and calorie/fat/sugar desserts.

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As usual, I totally agree with Cinwa.

Maintaining your weight at or a bit below your goal weight is not hard, but it is very important to take it very seriously.  All it requires is vigilence and refusing to accept any weight regain. I weigh myself every morning, eat a healthy diet high in lean protein and low in calories, take my vitamins, have an active lifestyle, and drink lots of liquids.

Importantly, I eat an especially low calorie diet, so that I will lose weight, whenever I gain a pound or two over my goal weight (usually on a vacation :rolleyes:).  

Never never accept any weight gain over your goal weight and fight hard to get immediately back down to your goal weight. The people who regain their weight after reaching their goal weight do so because they accept some weight regain, and five pounds becomes ten pounds becomes forty pounds and then it is very hard to get back to goal weight. 

For me, failure is not an option. 

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5 hours ago, Res Ipsa said:

...For me, failure is not an option. 

First, thank you for the reply.  You echoed my thoughts about the goal weight marker.  I feel sort of safe being a bit below, but from experience I remember (pre-wls) how quickly it can change to a slippery slope to significant gain.  I gather from those of you wiser than I that constant vigilance is the key.

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33 minutes ago, Imagine Blue Skies said:

First, thank you for the reply.  You echoed my thoughts about the goal weight marker.  I feel sort of safe being a bit below, but from experience I remember (pre-wls) how quickly it can change to a slippery slope to significant gain.  I gather from those of you wiser than I that constant vigilance is the key.

Yes, we have to stay on plan forever. People can and do stray, I don't intend to be one of them. I like weighing 196 a whole lot better than 356!

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4 years post op and I never let that fear out of my sight!  It keeps me vigilant.  Actively losing I weighed every other week.  Now I weigh every morning.  I can't do fried foods or alcohol.  They make me sick.  I don't keep sweets in the house...I avoid trigger foods!

i know 3 people who have gained it all back.  One keeps a coke and box of crackers on her desk.  My birth sister tried to talk me out of RNY (why?  Because I'd get sick and not be able to eat rice or pasta-she didn't make it to goal and has gained back).  Lol, jokes on her; I never liked rice and I view pasta as empty calories (very high calories for what you get out of it nutrition wise).  I still tend to read labels and compare in my head "are these calories healthy?  What's the protein to carb ratio? What's in it for me?"  If I'm craving candy at the store I read the bag-4 servings, 150 calories per serving-if I buy this what are the chances of me eating the whole 600 calories in one day?!  Not a good idea; put it back on the shelf!

keep the fear alive, it helps...

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I'm three years postop and am still maintaining at my lowest weight.  My secret to success is pretty basic.....

1) What you did to lose the weight is pretty much what you have to keep doing forever.

2) Never let a 1 pound regain turn into a 2, 5, 10 pound regain.  Nip the little gains in the bud.  Don't get "back on track" tomorrow.  Do it TODAY.

 

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I'm so happy to have found this group.  A point of curiosity: How would you describe the "honeymoon" phase and how long does it typically last?

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The honeymoon period is the time after surgery when you do not have much of an appetite. It typically lasts about nine months after surgery. 

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Here is more on the honeymoon period:

 

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21 minutes ago, Res Ipsa said:

The honeymoon period is the time after surgery when you do not have much of an appetite. It typically lasts about nine months after surgery. 

I'm beyond happy that mine has never ended!

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11 hours ago, tmcgee said:

I'm beyond happy that mine has never ended!

It's my experience that if you continue to follow the plan, our ability to maintain our weight without any problem continues.  It's only when we start to push the envelope and start to include the foods and treats that we don't need, that the struggle starts.

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