Plumpkins

One year out

23 posts in this topic

I know this forum helped me out a lot when I was looking to have this surgery, so I just wanted to give prospective sleeve-seekers an idea of what my life is like 1 year out:

I'm not going to lie and say that I followed the diet plans, because I did not. I ate too soon, drank alcohol too soon, and stopped worrying about the surgery about the third month out. I didn't take any vitamins until about 9 months out, and if I can offer you any advice, don't do that! I was feeling oddly like crap until I started taking a Calcium citrate / magnesium aspartate / Vitamin D supplement (all in one). After that, I started to feel great, so at least take that aforementioned mineral cocktail.

As for food, at one year, I can eat about 1.5 home-made double decker tacos (soft shell + refried beans with a real taco nested inside). Any more than that, and I'm full as hell. I'll probably even barf slime a little. As for slime, you'll never see it unless you eat waaay too much of something home-made. Anything fast food or junk food will pour down your sleeve without a care. I could eat a whole bag of chips in one setting if I wanted to (although I'd really never want to anymore). Lastly, beer, carbonated drinks? They won't phase you one bit after a year. You will have to take 20 drinks to finish a soda instead of the 2-3 gulps you could do it in before, but you can finish it. That said, watch drinking beer, as it's one of the last things you can have as much of as you want since it goes right through you. That can be dangerous if you don't want to end up getting drunk all the time.

All in all, I lost 120 pounds so far. I'd like to lose more, and I will if I make sure to eat real food and ease up on alcohol and fast food. Some people here are sticklers for the rules, but they do so because those rules lead down a guaranteed path of weight loss. That said, I'm out there throwing cation to the wind on occasion, and I couldn't be happier with my results. I think if you balance your common sense with your inner-derp, you'll get the results you're after. Take care, and thanks for all the support!

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To each it's own.

tmcgee and Clickin like this

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I am only 2 months out, and I appreciate your candid post, but where do you think you might be in 1 or 2 years if you aren't a bit more strict with your eating and drinking habits? Are you still losing? I just read so many posts about people who lost, only to gain it back again. I'm afraid for you. Just wondering where you plan to go from here?

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Good luck keeping your weight off. 

ThinCVT likes this

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As my Grandmother said "common sense ain't common."  Good luck to you. 

Clickin, ThinCVT, Minfit and 1 other like this

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Your "honeymoon" period is just st about over.  Just about anyone CAN lose weight during that period-it's keeping it off that really requires diligence.  You are 73 pounds from your goal, do you think you will get there?  

Were you given an eating plan?

Hope you don't eat fast food on a daily basis.  It's mostly calorie laden junk.  You can rack up quite a few calories in one sitting.  Many of us have changed our eating habits so we don't end up in the same place we were.  For many an occasional treat won't kill us but make it a routine and it could very well.  It's easy to defeat your surgery.  

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You can defeat the whole purpose of this surgery one m&m at a time. Why would you have major life-changing surgery if you weren't committed to following a life-long eating plan? 

Granted that some of us are fortunate in losing all appetite, I struggle to get all my nutrition in every day or I feel terrible. You already know that you need the vitamin/mineral supplements or you feel horrible, you just have to fix the fast food/alcohol diversion and you'll get to your goal.

I wish you the best! :)

Cheesehead and Clickin like this

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Congratulations on your one year! You've done well with your weight loss. I wish you continued success.  

 

I want to offer a huge word of caution to anyone reading this who is considering WLS surgery or newly out.  It is scary to me that someone might read the op and think they can have surgery and do whatever they want and still lose.  That may be true for some but not many.  It's also likely that if you do lose you will regain the weight if you eat whatever you want. This surgery doesn't make you thin and it doesn't keep you thin.  The choices you make every day get you where you want to be and keep you there.  Deciding to have this kind of surgery is a lifetime commitment to taking vitamins, eating protein first, not drinking when you eat, etc.  Following the rules gets you to goal and works long term. Period. Much of the damage from not taking your vitamins is long term and irreversible. The list is extensive and they're nasty and many are debilitating. Take all your vitamins and act like your life depends on it because it just may. Eating whatever you want and seeing how much you can eat is ridiculous IMO. It gets you nowhere and I see no benefit in it at all. Eat for the nutrition food provides. I'm not saying never eat a cookie but make it a small part of your plan not the daily habit at least until you're at goal and even then monitor your progress so you don't look down one day and see the scale is up 25lbs.  Keep in mind drinking alcohol can be a slippery slope and it offers nothing to your progress. Drinking it earlier than your program allows is dangerous.  Many people handle the occasional drink and do fine with it but leave it until your program says ok and you're at goal. 

So if you're considering surgery and you think you can have surgery and do whatever you want and magically be thin you're sadly mistaken. Just skip the operation because you'll be better off staying where you are. 

Edited by Raeme

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I doubt that the OP will come back despite the wonderful, well thought responses people posted. 

You folks are just great. One of the reasons I stay here.

Clickin, Dunndeal, JulieW and 7 others like this

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Warning to newbies....

please do not follow the advice of this OP.  You will lose weight in the first year postop pretty much no matter what you do.  It's in the next few years after that when all the bad habits will catch up with you.  And while 120 pound loss is amazing, this person is still obese and is very unlikely to get anywhere near goal.  It only gets harder in year 2, 3, etc.  Maintenance is far harder than losing and unfortunately this poster will find that out the hard way.  There is a reason the stats show only a 60% EWL for WLS....because while I lost over 100% of my excess weight (and kept it off) patients like this bring the average WAY down. 

So for those starting out, please follow your plan, make the necessary lifestyle changes and take this seriously.  It's the only way to achieve long term success.  On the other hand, the OP is perfectly happy still being obese, so if that's OK with you, then go ahead and follow their advice.  And it's not just about weight.....this poster also seems hell bent on becoming one of the 90% of gastrectomy patients that develop vitamin deficiencies without appropriate supplementation.  Followup labs are crucial to avoid this problem.

WendyH, Clickin, tmcgee and 9 others like this

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On September 10, 2016 at 8:56 AM, Spunkycat said:

I doubt that the OP will come back despite the wonderful, well thought responses people posted. 

You folks are just great. One of the reasons I stay here.

You're awesome and supportive too, Cathy. (Forgive me if I got the spelling wrong.)

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I love how you daily forum posters all rally against anyone that posts something divergent from your dogma. I had the surgery because I saw the weight building, and I wanted to curtail it. I'm 6'2 and built like a tank. Do I need to lose another 50-75 pounds? Yup. Would I look like an emaciated gangly-man if I weighted less than 225? Yup.

My decision to live a fairly normal life after having this surgery isn't throwing caution to the wind. I eat a SIGNIFICANT amount less than I did before. What the hell did you guys do, pound bags of M&Ms every day? Who does that? My diet before wasn't that bad, it was just voluminous. I ate like a beast, calorie surplus and all that. This surgery helped me curtail that behavior pattern.

You people are ridiculous. I'm 100% sure you make it a point to tell everyone in your life about your incredible journey overcoming obesity by having major life-changing surgery. Get over yourselves.

To anyone thinking of having the surgery, do it. My wife and I both did, and we don't regret it one bit. It'll help you lose weight, and you'll appreciate good food over large quantities of food. Tapas will be your friends now, instead of feeling like they're inadequate for dinner. Don't think you have to sit in your house, eating a tablespoon of cottage cheese for the rest of your life. If somebody has like 2-3K posts in this forum, just realize they probably use this surgery as a way to validate their lives, and will bash you for not worshiping their manifesto.

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32 minutes ago, Plumpkins said:

I love how you daily forum posters all rally against anyone that posts something divergent from your dogma. I had the surgery because I saw the weight building, and I wanted to curtail it. I'm 6'2 and built like a tank. Do I need to lose another 50-75 pounds? Yup. Would I look like an emaciated gangly-man if I weighted less than 225? Yup.

My decision to live a fairly normal life after having this surgery isn't throwing caution to the wind. I eat a SIGNIFICANT amount less than I did before. What the hell did you guys do, pound bags of M&Ms every day? Who does that? My diet before wasn't that bad, it was just voluminous. I ate like a beast, calorie surplus and all that. This surgery helped me curtail that behavior pattern.

You people are ridiculous. I'm 100% sure you make it a point to tell everyone in your life about your incredible journey overcoming obesity by having major life-changing surgery. Get over yourselves.

To anyone thinking of having the surgery, do it. My wife and I both did, and we don't regret it one bit. It'll help you lose weight, and you'll appreciate good food over large quantities of food. Tapas will be your friends now, instead of feeling like they're inadequate for dinner. Don't think you have to sit in your house, eating a tablespoon of cottage cheese for the rest of your life. If somebody has like 2-3K posts in this forum, just realize they probably use this surgery as a way to validate their lives, and will bash you for not worshiping their manifesto.

Pumpkins, the reality is what you are doing is not the norm.  You can be upset with us for pointing that out and thats fine, but the reality is that there is case after case after case in programs across there world where eating like you outline (even in smaller quantities) results in weight gain.  You might be the one in a rare few that does not happen to, but the odds aren't with you and in good conscious, those of us that have been here for a while cannot condone or promote your behavior as something others should emulate; the risks are too great for failure and these people have had hard enough lives struggling with obesity for decades and decades.

Also, please watch sweeping comments about things like "..you make it a point to tell everyone in your life about your incredible journey overcoming obesity by having major life-changing surgery. Get over yourselves."  You don't know these people and how they behave, I'm confident in saying that the vast majority of long-term WLS'ers never mention the surgery unless asked about it.  You have to expect coming to a WLS forum that posting that success is achieved through drinking beer and eating fast food would not be well received or condoned.  And by the way, I'm almost 3 years out and still don't drink carbonated beverages (beer or otherwise) because it is too uncomfortable.  If you can fine, that is your choice, but don't promote it as something everyone should do.

Now I'll say something I've never said on this forum, feel free to rant against me, imply that I am something and attempt to demean my comments as coming from someone who will only eat cottage cheese for the rest of his life (by the way I don't eat cottage cheese); that is your choice.  Regardless, I stand by my position and what the others have said, there is too much data to show that sticking to the program and eating healthy results in long-term healthy weight maintenance.

I wish you the best of luck, I truly do; it is your choice to believe me or not.

SuperMom69, Clickin, Lori88 and 8 others like this

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I don't post much on this forum, as I'm more active on another one, but I'm a 2 year veteran who has kept the weight off for a year and have been on forums for over 2 years. Still a babe in the woods, really, but here's what I know:

You're a year out. Still in your honeymoon period. You can pretty much eat anything you want and still lose weight during that time, because the overall lack of calories supports weight loss. It's science. But, you will not always have the great restriction and lack of hunger you feel now. Honestly, bariatric surgery is kind of temporary. Sure, you still have the tool, but people find ways to eat around it all the time. Otherwise, we wouldn't have an almost 50% (42% to be exact) regain rate, would we? As the months and then years go by, the results of the surgery wanes. Hunger and cravings return and capacity increases. It soon becomes all on you. So if you're still eating the crap you ate before the surgery with more hunger and larger capacity, what do you think happens? 

Weight gain, that's what. Ask 42% of people who regain with these surgeries. 

 

You HAVE to change your whole mindset when it comes to diet and exercise. You MUST eat healthier 90% of the time, choosing lean proteins, fruits, veggies and only whole grains when you choose to indulge in complex carbs. Once your metabolism changes, eating Tapas will not be conducive to maintenance. 

 

Don't believe me? Check out the literally hundreds of posts on this and many other WLS forums with the title "Help! I'm XX years out and gaining weight!" I'm sure they used to think they were invincible and had all the answers, too. 

 

Best wishes. 

 

 

 

Edited by Daisymom
Res Ipsa, Clickin, LeeC and 3 others like this

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This is a supportive community, we share the experiences we've had, those things that worked for us and those things that did not.

We are all different in the details, nobody is preaching as far as I can tell, it's just an exchange of information and offers of support for those who ask for it.

SuperMom69, Res Ipsa, LeeC and 2 others like this

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I can see both sides. I would hypothesize that the majority of people who seek weight loss surgery are either food addicts or exhibit some level of addictive behavior where food is concerned. Maybe this doesn't apply to you.

In my case, although I don't think I'm a full blown food addict, I do exhibit some addictive behaviors. The one that comes to mind is going back for serving after serving of desserts once I get started and hiding how many sweets I am eating by eating different servings around different people or hiding out and eating alone.

If there is truly no element of addictive behavior that led to your morbid obesity and you don't mind continuing to be heavy, just less so, it's your approach may provide results that satisfy you. The hard part will be maintaining your weight at that level.

I would caution you make sure you are maintaining a level of mindfulness about your behaviors that will allow you to replicate what's working for you as you get further and further away from surgery and your continued success is driven more and more by you and less and less by your sleeve.

Also consider that the human body is a remarkably resilient organism with a long memory. It will likely seek to betray you over time to try to rebuild the fat stores that you robbed it of, whether by head games or by gaining additional metabolic efficiency or both.

Res Ipsa and MarktheNerd like this

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4 hours ago, PapaG said:

Pumpkins, the reality is what you are doing is not the norm.  You can be upset with us for pointing that out and thats fine, but the reality is that there is case after case after case in programs across there world where eating like you outline (even in smaller quantities) results in weight gain.  You might be the one in a rare few that does not happen to, but the odds aren't with you and in good conscious, those of us that have been here for a while cannot condone or promote your behavior as something others should emulate; the risks are too great for failure and these people have had hard enough lives struggling with obesity for decades and decades.

Also, please watch sweeping comments about things like "..you make it a point to tell everyone in your life about your incredible journey overcoming obesity by having major life-changing surgery. Get over yourselves."  You don't know these people and how they behave, I'm confident in saying that the vast majority of long-term WLS'ers never mention the surgery unless asked about it.  You have to expect coming to a WLS forum that posting that success is achieved through drinking beer and eating fast food would not be well received or condoned.  And by the way, I'm almost 3 years out and still don't drink carbonated beverages (beer or otherwise) because it is too uncomfortable.  If you can fine, that is your choice, but don't promote it as something everyone should do.

Now I'll say something I've never said on this forum, feel free to rant against me, imply that I am something and attempt to demean my comments as coming from someone who will only eat cottage cheese for the rest of his life (by the way I don't eat cottage cheese); that is your choice.  Regardless, I stand by my position and what the others have said, there is too much data to show that sticking to the program and eating healthy results in long-term healthy weight maintenance.

I wish you the best of luck, I truly do; it is your choice to believe me or not.

Listen, I'm not here to troll or seek attention. I just read the hell out of this forum when I was at work, and I wanted some insight from others that have had this surgery. I'm using the forum as a journal, or sorts, for others that are curious about all different avenues of the surgery. I'm not giving advice to anyone in the pre-surgery forums. Please don't echo "But people will read this and...". Who cares? This post is a drop in the bucket in this forum. If any rational human being makes decisions based off statistic consensus of opinion, then my post is at worst benign background chatter.

I don't know why everyone infers that when I state I'm back to a normal ability to ingest a variety of things, only at a reduced rate and quantity, that automatically indicates that I am eating nacho cheese for dinner every night. I never said that. I can eat it, if I want to. But for the most part I'm eating a 1/4 cup of broccoli and a 1/4 cup of chicken breast for lunch or dinner like every day, and if I snack, it's on almonds (for the fiber). I like broccoli and grilled chicken, so that may be cheating, but that's beside the point. I also like to drink, so I do it on the weekends occasionally.

I only post this information, because I don't think you all realize how dark you make a future with this surgery sound sometimes when you post. I was on this forum before the surgery, and I started to contemplate not having my VSG of some of the posts on restrictions here. This forum is well structured, and I like the layout, so I frequent it more, but it was other random and sporadic posts on VSG websites that actually made me confident the surgery was a good fit for me. Those websites had people talking about what they could and could not do after surgery, and mostly talked about being able to do whatever they wanted (yet with restriction). They were not advocating to eat fast food, or drink, but knowing that you still could was comforting to me, because sometimes you want a taco, and sometimes you go out for some drinks. I didn't want that taken away.

When I read posts here, a lot of you longer term folks like to state your limitations in such a way that to someone seeking the surgery, it would appear that people can't drink carbonation anymore, or some other restriction. When someone like me comes along and says "Yea, you can drink carbonation", everyone looses their mind like I'm telling impressionable people to fire several cans of soda down. I never said that, I said you CAN drink carbonation. Can, as in it's an option, it's not off the table for the rest of your life. Sometimes I feel like this forum is treated less like a place to share experiences, and more like a support group for people addicted to food.

There are other places to discuss addictions. I just feel like this is a place to discuss VSG results / experiences / questions. I'm not trying to be abrasive, but it will be most likely construed that way.

Anyway, it's been a pleasure folks. Please continue to support this community, people appreciate it. I'll leave you to it, no more posts from me. Not said will malice, I'm just good to go now, I'm starting to get to the point where I forget what it was like to eat without the sleeve, and I'm good with that change.

Jabsie likes this

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I'd rather you would stick around, differing viewpoints are what makes life interesting.

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I agree with Tom, its too bad you're going; differing opinions are valuable.  Best of luck on your journey.

MarktheNerd, tmcgee, Raeme and 1 other like this

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Based on your follow-up, it sounds like you are making healthy food choices as well. Problem with this medium is we don't know you personally, we don't know your history, and we don't know your behaviors. All we have to go on is what you tell us. 

Go back and reread the post you made when you started this thread. You said you haven't followed the diet plan, didn't take your vitamins at first, drank too soon, drink carbonated drinks. You said that you eat tacos and fast food and that you're "throwing caution to the wind on occasion" (your words, not ours). You said that you will lose more weight if you ease up on alcohol and fast food and eat more real food.

It wasn't until your second rebuttal that you let us know that the majority of your eating is foods that fit a post-bariatric eating plan. It all finally makes sense now. You provided the missing piece that explains the disconnect that was generating concern. We really do care and want the best for each other.

 

 

Clickin, tmcgee, PapaG and 3 others like this

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I have absolutely no judgements of you. But as a new WLS patient, my nutritionist told me I couldn't ever have soda again. 

I hope you continue to contribute to the forum. And I wish you a lifetime of success with your post-op journey. If each of us individually had all the answers, we wouldn't be on this site. We each seek to support and get support/advice/perspective.

-Kim

tmcgee and Makenna Collicot like this

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plumpkins.

what gives you the right to tell anyone what to write or not right. The last time I looked, our country is founded on among other rights, freedom of speech. Nobody told whatbyou to write or not write. As a matter of fact several people asked you to remain. You sound angry in several parts of your posts. That is okay but anger is not okay when it hurts other people. I hope you stay on this forum and participate in further discussions. Best.......

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Plumpkins - I think your original post may have given folks the wrong idea, myself included. Your last comment helped to clarify things. Although we don't agree on everything, I hope you come back to the thread because there's some fair and important points you made that we could all benefit from discussing.

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