slars04

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    87
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About slars04

  • Rank
    Advanced Member
  • Birthday August 27

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    Outer Suburbia, Illinois

Information

  • Surgeon
    Dr. Matthew Pittman
  • Hospital
    Delnor Community Hospital
  • Height (ft-in)
    5-08
  • Start Weight
    265
  • Current Weight
    185
  • Goal Weight
    145
  • Body Mass Index (BMI)
    28.1
  • Surgery Date
    02/13/2017
  • Surgery Type
    Gastric Bypass

Recent Profile Visitors

465 profile views
  1. Wowzers! I've grown! Apparently I am 5'8" instead of 5'7". I must have had a squatty stance in order not to topple over. Who knew?!
  2. I have a side job at a retreat center as a facilitator (Villa Desiderata Retreat Center in McHenry, Illinois). I asked about a scholarship they have set up, thinking it was for high school seniors and they told me, "Of course you can have one!" I was flabbergasted. It will pay for this semester of nursing school. Who knew?!? Life is good.
  3. This is probably not an emergency in the real world, but getting some underwear is a top priority. I keep thinking, "What if I'm in an accident? Is this how I'll be remembered?" Thank you, Mom.
  4. I had a young man offer to help me fill my tires today. I thanked him warmly and said I was good. 5 months ago, I couldn't have bent over to get the caps off AND I was invisible to most people because of how I carried myself. (Although I don't see how, since I took up 2 chairs everywhere I went.) My Converse fit again! My duck feet are gone, and I have no more pain (the gout, you know) so I can wear heels and tower over people like a good woman should. My wedding ring flew off my hand when I was reaching for something. And I could crawl around to find it. Speaking of crawling, I scrambled under my desk to plug in my phone and righted myself without incident. Previously, I would have been like a turtle on its back, at least for a few moments. I wore a skirt and top to work (first time in 4 years) and I didn't feel like I was in drag. I was confident enough to apply for a scholarship for school and got it! Holy Shikies! My underwear looks like a dirndl skirt and/or comes up over my belly button like Stuart on "Mad TV." Maybe not such a victory, especially for my husband's eyeballs. I believe it's time to go shopping, which I can do without tears now.
  5. I am not the poster child for self control or following directions, but I was back at work in 5 days and back at school the next day (after my release). I had minimal pain, just really tired, maybe a little goofy from healing / recovery, but not uncomfortable. Other people took more time off to get good habits in place and while that wasn't an option for me, it is a VERY wise thing to do. The physical recovery was really a piece of cake; it's the mental challenges that threw me for a loop (and still can). Who knew food was fuel? Make the act of eating, drinking, and exercising in a different way the focus of what you do early on and you will solidify the habits that will keep you successful over the long haul.
  6. Oh my Heavens! My driver's license is telling the truth for the first time in 26 years!
  7. I would venture to say this thread is inactive because most people here don't think they have a problem with food addiction, or any addiction for that matter. AA is the way to go. You cannot think your way through this. Being smart or not having enough willpower doesn't have anything to do with it. Addiction is a medical condition with an emotional / mental / spiritual component and you cannot beat it alone. The best family in the world is not a good enough reason to stop if you've reached that stepping off point. You do not have to do this by yourself, and the anonymous thing is for real. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop drinking. You don't have to announce to ANYONE that you're an alcoholic. You can just sit and listen, if you like. If a meeting doesn't suit you, try others. Your PCP may very well be a great doctor, but if he is not familiar with addiction, his understanding will be different than that of someone in recovery. Please avail yourself of all the resources you can as you go through this. Don't punish yourself for switching addictions, but don't resign yourself to it either. You will lose everything you hold dear.
  8. Probably 30 in the 30 years prior to my surgery. BWAHAHAHAHA!
  9. For the record, I have made 9 (!) afghans since my surgery, 2 full size and 7 baby blankets. Oh, and a couple of dog coats. No obsessive tendencies here.
  10. So... I understand both sides of this and that being said, I have found it is easier to tell people who ask than to lie. It is easier for me to keep it straight and to be perfectly frank, who gives a #@$% what other people think? Even my family. It has taken me since way before my surgery date to get to this place. Today, I know that this is not a quick fix, that my head will be my worst enemy, and that I am worth saving. I was a person who thought WLS was the easy way out until I did more research and watched a friend of mine go through it. I know that I have tried traditional methods of losing weight and have been somewhat successful, but I've never been able to keep it off. I am tired of putting a moral judgment on a physical and mental condition (obesity and food addiction ,in my opinion, have components of both) for myself and anyone else subjected to this battle. For me, AND I SPEAK ONLY FOR MYSELF HERE, feeling like I could not talk about my surgery to people who know me fairly well meant that I was ashamed of my decision. After some "fudging of the truth" with people in my outer circle, it started to get too complicated and ultimately no one really cares other than they haven't seen me for a while and I'm no longer the Larson twins. It would be weird, actually, if no one noticed or said anything. I also realized that people ask if I'm ok out of concern because many people who have certain cancers lose a lot of weight quickly. People also notice because I'm not dressing like a Ninja all the time anymore. Part of my awkwardness also centers around my sexuality and control issues. Most people are just going to be more attracted to me as a thinner person. They are not bad or evil, and not everyone is out to hurt me. I knew going in that I would be confronted with certain aspects of my past due to sexual attention and I would not have food as a buffer. Knowing it and actually walking through it are animals of a different stripe, but the people who find me attractive are not being creeps (for the most part). They are being human. I'm the one who needs to figure out my own boundaries, not them. I'm the one who has to find my limits and speak up, or easier yet, walk away. People are allowed to be who they are. I do not have to participate, but getting so over-the-top enraged about some sexual attention / flirting says way more about my maturity level and coping skills than it does about the other person. Please understand here that I am not condoning any kind of forced sexual contact, or saying that I am responsible for making other people feel ok at any level; I'm just saying that healthy sexual interaction is something I am continuing to define as my weight drops. I have had a few uncomfortable moments with several women in my recovery community who yelled across the room about it (How'd you lose all that weight? What are you doing? Did you have "the surgery"?) and/or would not let it go in a public atmosphere. After I dragged them to the side and got them to let go of the death grip on my leg, I discovered they had been considering surgical options themselves and really wanted more information. They just had a messed up way of going about it. Again, not about me. I do encounter some jealousy about my weight loss and people baiting me with food, particularly family, but they would do that whether they knew about my surgery or not. HAHA! One thing I do with my family (read "Mother" and certain associates I must see fairly regularly) is say, "I don't want to talk about it." and walk away, hang up, or leave if they won't let it go. Works like a charm. They may never get it, but I am a grown-a$$ woman and I can decide what is discussable and what isn't. If their lives are so boring that they talk about me when I'm not there, all I can say is, "I'm here to help." This is your decision about whether or not to talk about your health issues. I support whatever you decide to do.
  11. I am sure this is more than you ever wanted to know about Poop Pills, but you eat someone else's encapsulated poop because they have the needed bacteria to fight C Diff. that your colon doesn't. It's sort of an immunological transplant, if you will, usually done because someone has had repeated C Diff infections and the traditional treatments (antibiotics) do not work. Probiotics won't replace or grow the needed bacteria to cure it at that point. It's actually kind of awesome. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3365524/
  12. We called them Poop Pills in micro. Who knew encapsulated turds could be a treatment instead of a punishment? Reminds me of the credits in "Polyester." They (poop pills) can cure C. diff, but I do not want to be the first in line for this. Much prefer yogurt to enhance my flora.
  13. I made it! I am officially overweight. BOOM!
  14. I am baffled as to why your doctor gave you a sleeve knowing you had GERD. Has he given you an explanation? You deserve answers.
  15. Food aversions are real and they suck. It's some primal thing to make us avoid things that will poison us, but Yikes! It is very hard to overcome. I have to wait about 3 weeks and then MAKE myself try some things again. Like chicken, beef, and eggs. I am trying to be patient, but I am getting pressure (and rightly so) from my healthcare team to eat as much "real" food as possible. I don't want to live off shakes, yogurt, and pudding either, but I sure don't want to yak in public. I didn't realize how much dehydration affects my ability to swallow - if I don't get enough fluids it feels like I have a lump in my throat. When I get to that point, I'm pretty dry and I don't even want to drink. I still have to think about drinking enough every day but generally speaking, eating and drinking are getting a lot easier and more automatic. I know you are talking about dumping, and it seems I've gotten off topic. Again. Oops...