Jabsie

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About Jabsie

  • Rank
    Senior Member

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Information

  • Surgeon
    Dr. Namir Katkhouda
  • Hospital
    USC - Keck Medical Center
  • Height (ft-in)
    5-05
  • Start Weight
    278
  • Current Weight
    159
  • Goal Weight
    160
  • Surgery Date
    9/2/2015
  • Surgery Type
    Vertical Sleeve

Recent Profile Visitors

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  1. I had terrible constipation on the pre-op diet as well as several months post. Prior to that I had never had any real issues with this. A couple of things to remember.... 1) Less in, less out. 2) You're not getting any bulk/insoluble fiber which on top of amble hydration, makes it easier to 'go'. Softeners seemed to do little for me so my nutritionist and doctor gave me the following advice.... Drink plenty of fluids If you don't have to go than it's not really a problem. It is a problem, however, if you need to go but can't. Don't let the constipation go on too long. The longer you experience it the harder it will be to 'go'. Use laxatives where necessary. Others have posted about a tea they found helpful that was a little more natural. I can't remember the name thought. Fiber supplements like Metamucil may not help in this instance because they provide soluble fiber (which keeps you regular) instead of insoluble fiber (which makes you go). I ended up needing Milk of Magnesia every couple of days. It was the only thing that did the trick. My doctor also suggested Magnesium Citrate should it get really bad. He referred to it as a 'digestive atom bomb' LOL! Not to be too crass but lack of a BM can affect the scale. It won't be 5lbs but you'll probably see a slight difference. Try to also remember that weight loss, especially for women, charts out like a jagged descending line, not a straight one. You've lost a lot of weight in a short period of time and your body is showing its objection with a stall. You're doing so great, Trish! Keep your eyes on the prize...we're all with you!
  2. You're welcome! I had heard a discussion about it when listening to a Sirius XM radio station called 'Doctor Radio'. It prompted a conversation with my Hematologist :-)
  3. Good luck! Let us know how you make out.
  4. Early out, I my daily protein goal was 80g. I changed that to 60g after about a year. On the initial topic of stalls/gains, here's a comment I made on another post that I think may also be applicable here..... Think percentages, not pounds: You could be losing the exact same percentage of excess weight every month even if you're losing less. Divide the amount you lost by your total excess body weight at the start of the month and you get a percentage (covert decimal to percentage). For example: If you had 100 lbs of excess weight to lose and drop 20 lbs, you've lost 20%. If you have 50 lbs to lose and drop 10 lbs, you've also lost 20%. This really helped me because there were times that I was initially discouraged when the total pounds I lost was less than the month before but when I did the math, my percentages were actually higher. Don't just weight, also measure: Shortly before my procedure, I started taking body measurements. This added metric turned out to be very valuable because there were weeks that I lost inches but not pounds. I too became religious about exercise after surgery so I think this may have had something to do with it. However, I know for me that weight loss is 90+% about the food and 10-% about exercise. I exercise not for weight loss but for the overwhelming health benefits, and how it makes my body look and feel. Weight is only one measurement of health: Metabolic health is measured by many things. Don't let the weight on the scale be your only motivational driver. Try and look at the other numbers that are improving as you transform your body. Blood sugar, cholesterol, blood pressure, muscle mass, increased mobility, physical stamina, etc... Those numbers are important too.
  5. Wow wow wow.....oh and WOW! What an incredible transformation!!!!
  6. I've been on Xarelto for over a year and have had zero issues with weight gain or water retention. I'll be on blood thinners for life and much prefer the relative low maintenance compared to Warfarin (Coumadin) where you have to have frequent blood work. The other possible side affects like bruising, excessive bleeding with cuts, heavy menstruation etc..., come with all blood thinners, not just Xarelto. Up until recently, the only significant drawback to Xarelto compared to Warfarin is that there was no reversal agent that would immediately counteract it in the instance of an emergency. That is no longer the case as the reversal drug was released last year. If you're still not comfortable taking it, contact your doctor about another drug asap. As I'm sure you're aware, Afib is not to be messed with. Weight gain and water retention is no fun but it's a small nuisance compared to a deadly blood clot. Trust me on this.
  7. That sounds like my type of spreadsheet! I'm such a data nerd. Im' so glad you found the suggestion helpful, Jen.
  8. Wow, thank you! All the positive feedback I'm getting about that post is inspiring me to get my butt to the gym today :-) Getting to this point has been a big investment but not super crazy. I exercise for 60 min., 5 days a week. 2 of those days include weight training. As social as I am, I HATE exercise classes so I'm usually on the treadmill, stair climber, or bike. When the weather permits, I walk/run/hike for cardio. It's hot as heck in LA right now so that's mostly off the table until September.
  9. No one knows our bodies better than we do but it's important to temper this with open mindedness. About 6 months post op, my nutritionist wanted me to change my goal weight/BMI to be higher than I originally planned. She felt that the goal weight I had set for myself had not taken into consideration my body composition. My initial response was a bit defensive. I really really wanted to put a check in that box next to my goal weight and tried to justify my reaction with stats and data I had come across in my own research. After a long discussion, I came to realize that I had become emotionally attached to a number. I had it in my head that once I got to that number, I would have achieved success. As it turns out, the goal that started me on this journey, the most important one, had gotten away from me.....I want to live a long time. Living a long time requires good health. Good health requires....well....a lot of things. I changed my goal weight and am glad I did.
  10. *blushing* Thanks Cinwa!
  11. This is so great! Thank you all!
  12. LOL! You don't need me but maybe we could be workout buddies. I too am from LA and Boston.
  13. Thank you, you made my day!
  14. I absolutely gained muscle mass while losing. In the first few months after surgery this is trickier because your caloric intake is depleted so dramatically and you're losing weight really rapidly. We can also lose muscle mass because there's less of us to carry around. It takes more muscle to maneuver a 250 lb body than a 190 lb one. However; a weight training program can help minimize muscle mass loss during this time. I use a system called 'Power of 10'. I added it my weekly cardio program early out and noticed the changes within about 3 weeks. I've never been more fit and strong as I am right now. I don't do the nutritional part because of my bariatric history but I am huge fan of the exercise component. There's a ton of health benefits associated with weight bearing exercise and I love how it has changed my body composition. The pictures below are from right before surgery and 9 months later. What ever you choose to do as far as weight training is concerned (assuming it's safe), your body will be better for it.
  15. Ah natures little trick....the more you lose, the harder it is to lose more. Really though, the smaller numbers are somewhat of an illusion. My nutritionist encouraged me to try taking the emotion out of it and look at it analytically when, early out, I expressed similar frustrations. Here's how she suggested I do so: Think percentages, not pounds: You could be losing the exact same percentage of excess weight every month even if you're losing less. Divide the amount you lost by your total excess body weight at the start of the month and you get a percentage (covert decimal to percentage). For example: If you had 100 lbs of excess weight to lose and drop 20 lbs, you've lost 20%. If you have 50 lbs to lose and drop 10 lbs, you've also lost 20%. This really helped me because there were times that I was initially discouraged when the total pounds I lost was less than the month before but when I did the math, my percentages were actually higher. Don't just weight, also measure: Shortly before my procedure, I started taking body measurements. This added metric turned out to be very valuable because there were weeks that I lost inches but not pounds. I too became religious about exercise after surgery so I think this may have had something to do with it. However, I know for me that weight loss is 90+% about the food and 10-% about exercise. I exercise not for weight loss but for the overwhelming health benefits, and how it makes my body look and feel. Weight is only one measurement of health: Metabolic health is measured by many things. Don't let the weight on the scale be your only motivational driver. Try and look at the other numbers that are improving as you transform your body. Blood sugar, cholesterol, blood pressure, muscle mass, increased mobility, physical stamina, etc... Those numbers are important too. I understand and hear your frustrations. After waiting so many years to be our ideal size, we're tired of waiting. We want results....and fast. But before you know it, this time will seem like a distant memory as you stand in your new, fit, and healthy body. Hang in there, you're doing GREAT!