createchange

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About createchange

  • Rank
    Senior Member
  • Birthday 03/11/1979

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    Columbus, OH
  • Age
    37

Information

  • Surgeon
    Sonnenstein
  • Hospital
    Riverside Methodist Hospital
  • Height (ft-in)
    5-06
  • Start Weight
    240
  • Current Weight
    135
  • Goal Weight
    140
  • Surgery Date
    11/26/2013
  • Surgery Type

Recent Profile Visitors

2,802 profile views
  1. I ran before surgery. Half marathons and was slow. Now I've run two marathons and am on pace to run a sub 2 hour half (which is literally half the time it took me to run my first half). Improving is so much faster as you lose weight! As far as fueling for distances, I have done really well with quest bars or protein shake and toast for breakfast. I also do protein with carbs when I run if I need something, because I don't do well with just straight carbs.
  2. My doctor suggested it. I thought it wasn't a responsible choice for me at the time because I did everything "right" and still couldn't lose weight. It took me almost a year to come around to the idea that if doing everything right for 10 years to lose the weight didn't result in any weight loss that I needed to do something different.
  3. I was about your size, I wore a size 18. I carried it well. I was strong. I worked out. I ate healthy foods. People told me they didn't think of me as fat. I still carried almost 100 pounds too much. I wear a size 4. I am strong. i work out. I eat healthy food. People tell me they can't believe I was ever heavy.
  4. I'll be the example of the other side of things. I exercise 6 days a week. I average 14 hours a week. I run long distances, lift weights, bike, and swim. All of this is fun for me and getting stronger/faster/more athletic was a goal that went along with surgery. I still had my 10 pound regain. My dr isn't concerned and neither am I...I actually am pretty confident that most of the regain was muscle as I moved into lifting heavier weights and I wear the same size clothes or smaller than I did 10 pounds less.
  5. I worked out before surgery for years. I took 4 weeks off from anything other than walking, 6 weeks off all weights to recover from surgery and I eased back in. By easing back in, I mean I lifted a little lighter and I ran a little slower or shorter. By the time I was about 12 weeks post op, I was back to and better than normal because I was lighter. I'm three years out. Lost 100 pounds. Run 2 marathons and average about 30 miles a week, lift twice a week, and swim, bike too. I spend about the same amount of time working out as I did before, I just lift heavier and go further now!
  6. I had to provide a document that included my weight loss attempts over the years. I listed weight watchers and other programs, including a nutritionist through work. I don't know that a dietitian being used to control gestational diabetes would suffice for insurance because the goal there wasn't weight loss and it was management of a temporary health condition.
  7. My husband and I have been together since we were 19...and married for 15 years. He has always been my best friend and he my best friend. His celeb crushes have always been chubby brunettes and I bet they always will be, so I know he has a type and I don't fit that anymore...but there is so much more to our relationship than the way either of us look. He enjoys my competitive nature and supports me in my athletic pursuits. It took him a while to get comfortable with me not being able to eat large meals (I just have leftovers...great for me!), but otherwise, not much has changed.
  8. I'm about three years out and I have a chocolate premier protein ready to drink shake with a milkshake straw every morning for breakfast! I tried mixing in the blender early out and it was too frothy and thick. I realized that the ready to drink were easy, portable, and caused no problems for me.
  9. I'm sorry you experienced this. It has been my experience as a 240+ pound runner and now that most people on the trails really are waving to say hi or support you, and very few are rude or intending to be rude. Is is possible that she was giving you a thumbs up as encouragement? I have had people do that to me heavy and not. If it happens again, consider that someone like me is trying to send you a positive message and we just failed at the delivery. Because if I saw you, I'd probably try and give you a high five! Sometimes I forget I am not heavy anymore and don't have the automatic credibility with other heavy people when we are out exercising, but I still cheer!
  10. Congrats on this milestone! And I totally agree with Clickin...take photos. I HATED taking pictures of myself, but I got a much better idea of what I look like and I get much less upset when I see a bad pic of myself because I know what the angles can do and that I have 10 others that are good!
  11. This was my question about a year and a half ago. I'm happy to say since then I have just gotten over it and will wear a bikini and even run in just a sports bra when it is hot.
  12. I very much was looking forward to being at the gym with the new year's resolution people and NOT being told by someone who just showed up what I could do to really kick start my weight loss (I was an avid gym goer at 240+). Sad to say that even as a very strong size 4, even this year after running two marathons and the gym staff knowing me by name, I had a guy explain to me how once I really got into it, I wouldn't breathe heavy ( I will always sound like that, i have a collapsed vocal chord and that just makes the fact I can run a 7:30 mile that much more badass). The thing I was really looking forward to that did happen, was when I tried on clothes and sucked it in to see if I could zip, and then realize I didn't need to suck it in. And even sometimes it was just too big!
  13. I started running again when I was 250 pounds. The first 1 minute intervals were very, very hard. I think the first time I ran for 6 straight minutes I went less than half a mile and I did vomit. I got to the point of being able to run for 1 minute intervals by doing incline work on the treadmill. There are some great incline workouts on pinterest, but even something as simple as 3-4mph at 6-8+% incline at the run section, week 1 and 2 of couch to 5k for a is a great base. I think it is worth it to give the entire program a try. If you hate running after you do your first full 5k, maybe try something else. But I don't know of too many people that put the work in and get to the finish line that don't like it enough to do it again. This past weekend I did an indoor triathlon and ran 2.4 miles in 20 minutes. I did two marathons in two weeks this fall. I am a running machine now. And when I go more than a day or so without a run, I feel sick. Sick like I did the first time I ran so hard I vomited.
  14. I had a bypass and I lost pretty easily for 9 months and then held steady for about 4 months. At 12 months, I was having some issues with my belly skin and I had held steady for a while, so my surgeon said it was a good time as any to have it removed. It was getting in the way of my exercise (which is a big deal to me, I am kind of obsessed with endurance sports). After the surgery I lost another 10 pounds pretty easily. Then I held stead for over a year. I actually had another surgery for female issues and lost a little more, but that bounced back pretty quick. I ran two marathons last year and knew I would likely gain...I had to eat more carbs to support my activities and I built a lot of muscle. I wear a size 2/4 and weigh about 142 now at 5'6".
  15. I thought it was an interesting article. I think the point they were making about being happier, is that things that are not affected in large part by your weight, aren't going to suddenly get all better. If she hated school because she didn't fit in her desk and only for that reason, then school would be fixed...but that wasn't the problem so it couldn't be fixed with weight loss. And I agree with that point. I am not particularly happier because I had surgery. The things that were hard in work are still hard. The family dynamic is still hard. I just move through life a little easier. I am not also carrying around extra weight and the health challenges that come with it. I also feel like a year isn't enough time. I think they should have followed people for 2-5 years, but not longer because the people that had surgery much longer before did so in a much different atmosphere. I'm 3 years out and my surgeon said most people regain weight in year 2 to 3. Not sure if that is most people or most in his practice.