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Masquerading as a Normal Person

Jen581791

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I’ve been asked by a couple of people this week if I’m a “runner.” I’ve also been asked if I want to go overnight backpacking. And also which gym I belong to (because of course I belong to one). This is a new thing. I don’t think these people are being polite - I think they see it as an actual possibility that I am that kind of person (I’m trying to be). I’m still overweight: I won’t hit that magical “normal” BMI number for another 10 pounds. However, I look pretty normal.

This is all a little alarming. Number one, I’m definitely going to betray and abandon the old fat me. I’m living in a new place where no one knows me yet. I do not remotely feel tempted to tell anyone that I’ve recently lost a lot of weight. I’m trying to decide whether I’m trying to hide my past, run from my past, erase my past, or whether I’m just moving on in a healthy way. Number two, I’m going to have to do some awfully sporty things to keep up this facade. This is probably a very good thing for me. I tend to be a baseline fairly lazy person unless I’m pushed by something to work out a lot. Sometimes that something is vanity, sometimes it’s boredom, and sometimes it’s a quest to keep up with peer pressure. It’s what’s led to the periods in my life - sometimes they’ve been several years long - when I’ve been in good shape. This could be a really good motivator for me. 

I went camping with a group of people this weekend. I love camping. This was just car camping, so nothing athletic about it, but it was the group of people that was athletic. This is a group whose respective hobbies include: rock climbing, backpacking, weightlifting, cycling, long distance running, kite surfing, yoga, ultimate frisbee, surfing, and… well, you name it. If it’s an outdoorsy, athletic thing, at least one of these people does it. It was a little intimidating. They were all very nice, though, and are excited to incorporate us into their sporty group. I hope I can keep up. It may actually push me to do things I want to do in theory but am a bit chicken to do without some external motivating factors. 

This brings me to my love/hate relationship with running, which I am contemplating starting again. Weight loss has always been accompanied by running in my life. Chicken or egg sort of thing - not sure which spurs on the other, but they seem to go hand in hand. I wrecked my ACLs in my teens (soccer left and downhill skiing right), so I’ve had to be careful about how heavy I am when I run. Below 180, I seem to do OK. When I had my surgery, one of the things I promised myself was that when I got to that threshold, I would start running again. Running makes me feel good (eventually! it sucks for a while). It gets me in shape the way little else does. It seemed like a really long way off when I made that decision, perhaps an imaginary amount of time in the future. Maybe I’d never get there - statistically I wouldn’t, since average weight loss after RNY is something like 70% of total excess weight, and that would still put me above 180. 

Well, it’s been coming on the horizon for a while now, and I’ve hit and passed the 180 mark. I’m at 175 today (-82% of total excess weight). I have not started the running. This is where I confess to my “reasons” (excuses). 

Best reason, possibly an actual reason rather than an excuse: I broke some toes a few years ago and continued to wear high heels for a couple of months afterwards instead of buying some flats to let the toes heal properly. Hey, at least I quit running to let them heal. I realize how stupid this sounds in retrospect, but as a formerly sporty person, I have broken toes many times in my life, and you can’t really do anything about them. You just tape them up and let them heal. The stupid part, the high heels, was because at the time I only wore heels. I didn’t own any sensible flats other than workout shoes or hiking boots. I didn’t want to buy flats just for the few weeks it would take for my toes to heal. This was a mistake, as it had a knock-on effect on the rest of my foot. My metatarsals got a bit whacked out of alignment because of my idiocy. This led to some foot pain that led to me not getting back to running. More pain -> less exercise -> weight gain -> more pain -> less exercise -> weight gain -> more pain, etc. (depression fits into that equation somewhere, too) The good news is that the pain is getting better with the weight loss. The bad news is that my foot still hurts a bit when I walk for a long time. I’m thinking of testing out my pet theory that running will put pressure on different places and might not hurt. 

Next best reason, sort of an excuse, but maybe not?: my knees are delicate creatures and have now been put under the strain of me being a lot heavier for several years. I am also older. My parents both had/have knee problems. I don’t want to wear my poor knees out. Of course, this does not take into account the fact that running on the proper surfaces with good shoes shouldn’t be a problem if I’m not too heavy, and also that running can strengthen the muscles that help support my knees. And now I’m below that magical 180 threshold…

Worst reason, definitely an excuse: I’m afraid of looking fat when I run. I know I am not in running shape, and I fear people looking and judging as I get over that first few months hump of looking awkward and gasping for breath and not being in shape. I’m jiggly and bouncy. I want to look like a tiny gazelle running. I do not look like that now. If I try running, I’ll have to do it at the gym, on a treadmill, facing a mirror (why oh why are gyms full of mirrors) and in front of whoever is there working out. It’s still really hot here, so no outdoor running yet. The only way to NOT look bad running is to start running and get in shape, I know. But what if I wait another 20 pounds? 

Feel free to tell me of your thoughts on my reasons/excuses in the comments. I’m trying not to be stupid, but I’m also trying to not let my lazy and chicken-hearted inner voices control me. 

So, operation Masquerade as a Normal Person is in full swing. I am a Healthy Person who eats very little, mostly protein. I am a Person Who Exercises Regularly. I am a Sporty, Outdoorsy Person. No one knows any different here, so I’m just going to go with that. 

Am I betraying my formerly fat self? I’m of two minds about that. She is me, and neither of us liked being that person, suffering physically and emotionally all the time and beating herself up for her failures and shortcomings. It was awful and depressing, and leaving that chapter behind is a positive step forward. On the other hand, she is me, and erasing her from the picture is not honoring the she who became me, or the me that comes out of her suffering. I am the product of all of the experiences of my life, whether they were experiences I want to talk about and share or not. She will always be there, even if I don’t acknowledge her to anyone else. It feels a little like photoshopping out an ex from all of my photos, though. 

Carving out a new identity is a big part of extreme weight loss. I know that. I’ve done that before (several times). Carving out a new identity is also a big part of moving to a new country, far from people you know. I know that. I’ve done that several times, too. Put both of those factors together, and I’ve got the potential for a whole new life, one that I can mold and shape as I want to. At some point, rearranging your life to consist of entirely new behaviors and experiences does actually make you a different person - the underlying personality is there, but with new thought processes and habits layered on top. I think that’s called growth. 


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29 Comments




Oh my goodness, Jen! EIGHTY-TWO PERCENT!!!! Yahoo! Well done!

I don't think you're betraying your former self by living in the present. I think living for today is the best way to live.

I love exercise, but I've never been, nor ever plan to be, a runner. Just too hard on my joints and not enough fun. So I'm not a great person to ask about that. If you need someone on Team Avoid Running, I'm your gal. I have a friend (a fitness instructor!) who says, "If you ever see me running, you should run too, because it means something's chasing me".

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I'm definitely one for the clean slate moves. I did it after my first WLS, and I'll be doing it again in the next couple of years. Sometimes it's the best thing we can do for ourselves.  Mindful exercise isn't something I do very often but I know that I have to start sometime. For now my excuse is being non-weightbearing on orders from my ortho. I know I'll never run...in fact weight-bearing exercise is out for life in my case. I've decided I'll try pilates....everyone I know that hates exercise seems to like pilates, so hopefully I'll be the same. I need the core strength and toning, but for now that can wait.

Congrats on the 82% EWL. It's an amazing feeling once you hit the 100%.....won't be long now for you to experience that goal.

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5 hours ago, Gretta said:

"If you ever see me running, you should run too, because it means something's chasing me".

:lol::lol::lol: Absolutely understand that. That's exactly how I feel until I've been running for a few months! That's how long it takes to not be torture...

82% seems pretty unreal. If it stops tomorrow, it will have been totally worth it. The next 18% is really just bonus.

Edited by Jen581791
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4 hours ago, Aussie H said:

I'm definitely one for the clean slate moves. I did it after my first WLS, and I'll be doing it again in the next couple of years. Sometimes it's the best thing we can do for ourselves.  Mindful exercise isn't something I do very often but I know that I have to start sometime. For now my excuse is being non-weightbearing on orders from my ortho. I know I'll never run...in fact weight-bearing exercise is out for life in my case. I've decided I'll try pilates....everyone I know that hates exercise seems to like pilates, so hopefully I'll be the same. I need the core strength and toning, but for now that can wait.

Congrats on the 82% EWL. It's an amazing feeling once you hit the 100%.....won't be long now for you to experience that goal.

Thanks, @Aussie H - I'm looking forward to joining you on the 100% completed bench. I know that's exactly when things get tricky, but I'm looking forward to it. 

Pilates is supposed to be great. Let us know when you try it - I'd love to hear how it goes. 

 

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82% is fantastic!!!  Ok, I have a silly question - do you count this from your highest weight?  Or from your weight at the time of surgery?  For me, those would be very different numbers.  :)  

I applaud you on your successful masquerade, too.  But I wonder if you're having a bit of imposter syndrome?  You seem like you're sporty now because you ARE so much sportier than you used to be!  You used to be a Winnebago... now you're a cute little Fiat.  ;) And you're far more physically active than you were before, too, and it probably shows.  You may be looking at the you of today through the eyes of a year ago...

I get you on the running - it's something I have always associated with fitness, since my dad used to be a distance runner.  He had an accident later in life and became very, very unfit, which he remained all his life.  But that early training has stuck with me.  I was never able to do much running even as a kid - I think 3 miles is the most I ever managed, and that with extreme reluctance.  Now... well, I'd have to see truly significant improvement in my knee pain before I could even think about it.  There are plenty of forms of exercise that won't chew up whatever cartilage I have left!  (Still - being the horror fan that I am, I am deeply looking forward to the ability to outrun any zombies that come my way...!)

I'm really glad to have you around - it's so interesting to see someone acclimating to the process of getting to goal.  I think you're handling all of this with extreme grace and wisdom!

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38 minutes ago, Kio said:

82% is fantastic!!!  Ok, I have a silly question - do you count this from your highest weight?  Or from your weight at the time of surgery?  For me, those would be very different numbers.  :)  

I applaud you on your successful masquerade, too.  But I wonder if you're having a bit of imposter syndrome?  You seem like you're sporty now because you ARE so much sportier than you used to be!  You used to be a Winnebago... now you're a cute little Fiat.  ;) And you're far more physically active than you were before, too, and it probably shows.  You may be looking at the you of today through the eyes of a year ago...

I get you on the running - it's something I have always associated with fitness, since my dad used to be a distance runner.  He had an accident later in life and became very, very unfit, which he remained all his life.  But that early training has stuck with me.  I was never able to do much running even as a kid - I think 3 miles is the most I ever managed, and that with extreme reluctance.  Now... well, I'd have to see truly significant improvement in my knee pain before I could even think about it.  There are plenty of forms of exercise that won't chew up whatever cartilage I have left!  (Still - being the horror fan that I am, I am deeply looking forward to the ability to outrun any zombies that come my way...!)

I'm really glad to have you around - it's so interesting to see someone acclimating to the process of getting to goal.  I think you're handling all of this with extreme grace and wisdom!

Thanks, @Kio! I'm counting from my highest weight, which was about a month before surgery. I lost 20 pounds in that pre-op month, which I definitely count in my WL total. I've seen people on the internets do it both ways, but to me, the losses pre-op are pretty much due to the mental click that getting surgery scheduled made happen, and we ALL know I would have gained those 20 back by now if I hadn't had the surgery, so it seems legit to me. 

I may be having impostor syndrome may be a piece of the puzzle, but I am truly much less in shape than these people are assuming. I guess in a few months that might not be the case... at that point, I'll give in an consider myself an in-shape kind of person. 

Being able to outrun zombies is a useful skill to have. I am a deeply committed zombie genre fan (RIP George Romero), and these kinds of thoughts do cross my mind. There is actually a running app that does the audio of story about zombies chasing you, and you have to outrun them when it indicates they are on your tail. I may look into that (furiously googling zombie running app). 

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I have that app!  It's called Zombies, Run!  (appropriately enough) and has tons of "seasons" of story now, though my favorite is still the first.  I use it for walking, but walk faster when I'm supposed to run.  :)  It's awesome!

Leah is fond of saying "I don't have to outrun the zombies; I just have to outrun you!"  It won't be long now before that's not a sure thing.... ;) 

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Hmmm.

You're like 110% successful, even-keeled, and excellent proof you don't need exercise to lose weight. You have had one the most admirable trajectories seen on the Forum recently. You've done it with perseverance, and adherence to a substantially restricted caloric intake that many of us admire. 

Independent of the weight loss issues, people who exercise live longer, live more healthy lives, and have fewer cardiovascular Bad Things happen to them. Just this past week, the Lancet reported a giant study of a gazillion people conducted in a zillion countries, and there was a gradient of benefit that matched the gradient of exercise. Controlling for things like weight, smoking,etc etc - fewer strokes, fewer heart attacks, less death. It's not Big News because it conforms to the preponderance of scientific evidence that already exists. It just nails it in a big, international way. Was the magnitude really big? Yes. Was it as big as reducing yourself to half your former size? No. But that is only because the health risks of obesity are unbelievably high. 

All of us should exercise because the health benefits are substantial. Yoga, cycling, swimming, kayaking, Pilates, lifting weights, rowing, martial arts, tai chi, ... lots of things that would not put knees or toes at risk. These facts are not negated, or made larger, by your trajectory. You may not be giving yourself enough credit, since you have posted about achieving your walking goals.... that is exercise (and one that involves your foot and your knees). :rolleyes:

I think you best honor yourself, include the "Incredibly Brave Person who decided to have WLS" version, and the "Incredible Jen who is being created now" version, by doing everything you can to be healthy. Externally speaking, not being in your shoes, this objectively should include exercise.

The issue of being an Imposter is one many of us, including me, wrestle with. Migrating from the view of being an Imposter to the view that this wonderful health is now yours, that you own it, that the True You is the fit you .... maybe it could be in part cemented by the endorphin release, companionship, personal satisfaction, touch of vanity, and other things that exercise brings. It's not just pain and sweat. Plus adding some more exercise now will help cement your loss and keep you from re-gaining, which is the Deep Dark Fear that helps feed the notion of being an Imposter.  

When I cycle I see the changing of the seasons, I get waves from other cyclists who know me by my appearance, I stop to help people who forgot to pump up their tires or bring a tire patch kit. Every weekend there are parents with very young children teaching them how to ride their bikes, and I'm reminded of the similar tender moments with my parents, and with my own son. When I row in the gym I briefly relive the highs of rowing in college. When I'm near the water I hear the birds and see the wildlife and the beauty in nature. So this rubric of exercise has a lot in it. 

If you never exercise a whit you will still be a person I admire for your success; and you too should give yourself a lot of credit for this. You are no Imposter. You are a brave soul who has made a great choice and irrevocably changed your life. 

 Me, I'd buy some Spandex and do stuff that made you happy. ;) 

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Amazing post (as per usual) @Jen581791! As others have stated, your postings help me envision what my future on this WLS journey might look like.

Regarding your question about running, I do not see you saying that you aren't going to exercise at all.  As you have posted, you are already exercising - whether that be the speed walking or going to the gym with your husband.  So I don't feel the need to extol the virtues of exercise or to warn you that you'll lose more only if you get active.  You are there.  While you may have all the justifiable reasons to not run (the knee issues alone intimidate me), don't let those reasons prevent you from doing something new or becoming more active.  Maybe running isn't going to be the option but what do you want the alternative to be? (see great list above by BB). 

On the note of a new identity, what would make you feel like you were honoring your former self and not abandoning her?  Who you were is intricately linked into the fabric of your life and your strengths today come from the experiences of your former self.  I don't believe that the former self can ever be truly abandoned, even if it is for good, because we remember where we came from.  It's how we can marvel in our resilience and use that to survive difficulties and to help others.  On that note, you might consider some of the ways you are NOT abandoning your former self.  Your role here on the forum has been immensely helpful and inspirational to many individuals.  So you don't want to be 'out' to your new colleagues, that makes total sense to me, so how do you honor your former self and the struggle with weight that led her to the WLS decision?  Keep sharing your story via the forum that makes you most comfortable.  Maybe, if you meet someone who might benefit from WLS and you feel comfortable, you can share your story with him/her.  I have a strong suspicion that you are an empathetic person who uses her gifts to help and inspire those she meets, weight-related issues or non-weight related.  THAT is a tribute to your former self.

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P.S. This (self-compassion) is not directed at exactly what you're talking about, but there might be some ideas in there for you. I thought of it in the sense of honoring the person you were. 

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26 minutes ago, Carina said:

P.S. This (self-compassion) is not directed at exactly what you're talking about, but there might be some ideas in there for you. I thought of it in the sense of honoring the person you were. 

Thanks, Carina. I really enjoyed reading that, and I think it's something probably all of us on this forum probably need some help putting into practice! It's often hard to remember to be nice not just to myself, but also to her, my old me. I often get frustrated with how she let herself get out of control, even seeing now that when given a great tool, she got her $h!7 together and got herself under control pretty quickly! I kind of need to be retroactively self-compassionate, if you see what I mean.

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51 minutes ago, Carina said:

P.S. This (self-compassion) is not directed at exactly what you're talking about, but there might be some ideas in there for you. I thought of it in the sense of honoring the person you were. 

<< Great >>

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21 hours ago, BurgundyBoy said:

Hmmm.

You're like 110% successful, even-keeled, and excellent proof you don't need exercise to lose weight. You have had one the most admirable trajectories seen on the Forum recently. You've done it with perseverance, and adherence to a substantially restricted caloric intake that many of us admire. 

Thanks, BB, but I have been exercising, just not running! :) I just checked my Fitbit app, and it's got me clocked in at 1,789,560 steps since mid-April, which works out to 10,560 steps per day, or just about 5 miles per day. My exercise has been mostly walking, though, so if anyone thinks they can't do this with walking alone, I'm here to say it's doable (and doable without exercise at all if you have physical requirements that dictate that). From this point on, though, and especially to prevent regain, doing more high-intensity and weight-bearing exercises will probably be my best bet - that's where the running comes in. Since I'm now in a place where I can belong to a gym, and the weather is too warm outside for much in the way of exercise still, my routine has gone from lovely walks outdoors to treadmill + elliptical + weights (which I don't like but I know I should do to help fight against regain). 

Thank you for the info on the study about the health benefits of exercise. It's nice to get a broader, more epidemiological perspective on this topic, since we here on the forum tend to see it through fairly personal lenses normally. Gazillions of data points add up to some very good reasons to exercise. 

I actually tend to be a fairly active person when not weighed down by by own body quite so much. I find that my activity decreases after I gain, which points to it being an effect of the weight gain rather than a cause. When my weight goes down, I magically don't mind exercising again - it seems that carrying around 100+ pounds of extra weight makes exercise unfun - go figure! ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

I plan to take full advantage of living near both the mountains and the sea this winter as the weather gets more pleasant outside - hikes, walks, kayaking, etc. I won't have the changing fall colors to contemplate, but the flowering of the bougainvillea makes up for that. It's so much more pleasant to get out and do things when I have less ME to carry around. 

Edited by Jen581791
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4 hours ago, CurvyMermaid said:

On the note of a new identity, what would make you feel like you were honoring your former self and not abandoning her?

That's a really good question. Sometimes I feel like the best way to honor my former self is to march ahead and not look back at all - in fact, that's how I often tend to lead my life, outside of the realm of all things WLS related. Tomorrow is another day! At the same time, it feels a little like I've relegated the last few years of my life to the memory hole sometimes. 

4 hours ago, CurvyMermaid said:

On that note, you might consider some of the ways you are NOT abandoning your former self

I agree that this is probably healthiest.

Way number one: "sharing my journey" (how's that for some WLS support forum jargon?!:D) - I do think that the stuff people read about how this whole thing works can be amazingly helpful both for people living it, but just a month or few months behind, so they can start addressing issues they feel might be coming up in their near futures and learn from my experiences, and also for people contemplating surgery. If I hadn't spent 1000 hours reading other people's blogs, would I be where I am today? Probably not. Lots of courage and inspiration gained from reading other people's stories. A million thank yous to those who went before me and contributed to the community conversation. 

Way number two: being kind and empathetic and seeing the true inner person in the heavy people I see around me every day. Society is pretty hard on overweight people, in a million little ways, and many big ways, and life in general is just a bit harder when you're heavier. There's more to worry about and stress about and get nervous about (and get angry at yourself for). I can work hard on not forgetting that and interacting with the overweight people I know with compassion and respect that they do not get from many others. 

Way number three: using the memories I have of my life as an overweight person as a cautionary tale to scare myself straight when I need it. "Hey, remember me? Don't do that again, OK??? Put those potato chips down."

Thanks for your insightful questions and comments. I think I owe you about $400 for the therapy session. Your check is in the mail.

Edited by Jen581791
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An addendum: 

After reading what I wrote yesterday, my reasons and excuses, I made up my mind to try running (let's be frank here, it's jogging when I do it at my speed) today at the gym because I had no really great reasons to not at least try. I ended up doing 10 minutes of my 45 minutes on the treadmill at a 5mph pace, and shocked myself by finding that my cardiovascular system was totally up for this. I wasn't really even winded at any point, which is weird. I mean, I normally walk pretty fast, but has that prepared me for jogging? I guess so. I think I may have some tired muscles tomorrow, but that's OK.

Anyway, it didn't feel any different on my slightly ouchy foot than walking does, and no knee pain. I'll give it a go a few more times before I pass final judgment on the foot thing. I think for the knee problems, I'm only going to keep losing at this point, so I should be OK as long as I do some knee strengthening exercises, as well. 

My only real problem is that I need a way more hardcore sports bra. Time to double up for now, and go shopping soon. 

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6 hours ago, Jen581791 said:

My exercise has been mostly walking, though, so if anyone thinks they can't do this with walking alone, I'm here to say it's doable

My only exercise at this time is walking 5x per week 8K+ steps per day.  Honestly, I have never been a runner.  Running hurts. :D  Love this post @Jen581791 - thought provoking as always :P

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4 hours ago, TammyP said:

My only exercise at this time is walking 5x per week 8K+ steps per day.  Honestly, I have never been a runner.  Running hurts. :D  Love this post @Jen581791 - thought provoking as always :P

Tammy, you're exactly 4 months behind me :) (Feb 14 - June 14). At about 3.5 months out, I'd say 8000 steps 5x per week is good! It's the keeping at it that's important. 

Certainly not everyone is a runner - it hurts for too long for most people to get over the hump, and then it's boring... :lol: Maybe it's a masochistic streak in me. I might be whipping myself into shape in more ways than one.

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13 hours ago, Jen581791 said:

Certainly not everyone is a runner - it hurts for too long for most people to get over the hump, and then it's boring... :lol:

12 years ago I ran 10 miles a day. I know what a love/hate relationship that is. I am hoping to run a 5k within the year.

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15 hours ago, Jen581791 said:

My exercise has been mostly walking, though, so if anyone thinks they can't do this with walking alone, I'm here to say it's doable (and doable without exercise at all if you have physical requirements that dictate that). 

Im living proof that this weightloss gig is absolutely doable without exercise. I haven't yet been cleared for any exercise,  yet I'm already in a healthy BMI range and below the goal all my medicos have set for me. My bariatric surgeon hasn't cleared me yet for any kind of weight lifting.....but I haven't asked yet because I haven't actually seen him since my two week check. Ortho surgeon won't be clearing any weight-bearing activity for at least another 6 weeks. I'm actually looking forward to be given the okay to just walk again, but someone I know who had similar surgery two months ahead of me is still not cleared for that, so not holding my breathe yet. I've so far managed to maintain my weight while doing nothing at all, just sitting down or laying on the couch all day long. I'm due to see the bariatric surgeon in three days so will see what he has to say. Like you Jen I know I need to sort something out, I think in my case it might be a very gradual progression just to get back to trying to staying upright. I'm having definite issues with lower end normal blood pressure (102/65 this morning compared with my pre-surgery norm around the 139/95 mark) making staying upright a very dicey proposition as dizziness, blurred vision and crutches don't exactly sit well together.....another discussion to be had with the surgeon later in the week.

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4 minutes ago, Aussie H said:

Im living proof that this weightloss gig is absolutely doable without exercise. I haven't yet been cleared for any exercise,  yet I'm already in a healthy BMI range and below the goal all my medicos have set for me. My bariatric surgeon hasn't cleared me yet for any kind of weight lifting.....but I haven't asked yet because I haven't actually seen him since my two week check. Ortho surgeon won't be clearing any weight-bearing activity for at least another 6 weeks. I'm actually looking forward to be given the okay to just walk again, but someone I know who had similar surgery two months ahead of me is still not cleared for that, so not holding my breathe yet. I've so far managed to maintain my weight while doing nothing at all, just sitting down or laying on the couch all day long. I'm due to see the bariatric surgeon in three days so will see what he has to say. Like you Jen I know I need to sort something out, I think in my case it might be a very gradual progression just to get back to trying to staying upright. I'm having definite issues with lower end normal blood pressure (102/65 this morning compared with my pre-surgery norm around the 139/95 mark) making staying upright a very dicey proposition as dizziness, blurred vision and crutches don't exactly sit well together.....another discussion to be had with the surgeon later in the week.

You're a great example of that! Do you think swimming or something might be in your future? It'll be a challenge to find exercise that will help not hinder your progress when you get to that point. I hope you find something you like :) 

Careful with the blood pressure dizziness. Is there anything you can do except eat more salt?? Crutches + dizziness = more reasons to be on crutches if you're not careful! Take it easy on yourself.

Edited by Jen581791
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3 hours ago, Jen581791 said:

You're a great example of that! Do you think swimming or something might be in your future? It'll be a challenge to find exercise that will help not hinder your progress when you get to that point. I hope you find something you like :) 

Careful with the blood pressure dizziness. Is there anything you can do except eat more salt?? Crutches + dizziness = more reasons to be on crutches if you're not careful! Take it easy on yourself.

Some kind of water exercise will be the go. Not quite warm enough here yet though. Plus I need to be weight-bearing to be able to clean my pool before I can use it. Definitely not paying to use the public pool when I have one in my own backyard. No public heated pools where I live. Plus my cast isn't waterproof so even water exercise has to wait......could still be another 6 weeks in a cast yet but I'm hoping only two then a moon boot. I so need a pedicure and I'm not paying full price to only have one foot done!!!!

I've already come of the crutches twice....wasn't even safe on the knee walker when a stupid little stone got in the way! The dizziness is driving me nuts. Hoping the surgeon has a solution on Thursday, but for now it's salt and more salt. I have lashed out and bought an aero pilates rebound bench so hoping I like that. Still need clearance first though....plus I have to assemble it.

Edited by Aussie H

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3 hours ago, Aussie H said:

I so need a pedicure and I'm not paying full price to only have one foot done!!!!

:lol::lol::lol:

Best of luck with getting cleared to move around, getting the blood pressure normalized a bit, and hopefully the water exercise will be an option soon!

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Kicking butt and taking names!

I feel  you a lot on running and the chicken/egg concept. I've got the same list of excuses, even! Although being pre-op I have a long way to go before I can consider anything but walking/hiking/elliptical for cardio, I know how easy it is for everything else to get in the way. But you've made it so far! 

Given your successes without running, I think it really comes down to whether you want it or not. You don't need to be a runner to backpack and camp. My main problem with running always circles back to one thing - you have to keep it going for it to work well! So while you're creating your new identity, think about whether running is part of it - or is just part of what your former self thought your new self would be?

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On 10/2/2017 at 10:50 PM, delilas said:

My main problem with running always circles back to one thing - you have to keep it going for it to work well!

Too true, too true. I've done three days of "running" (jogging) now, and I'm a bit sore, but not too bad. I'm up to 15 minutes now, which sounds pretty good to me. I think keeping running as a thing I do some, rather than I person I am is probably for the best. It does a great job of getting my body into shape, but it bores the socks off me if I'm on a treadmill, and I always end up losing toenails from running, which is not pretty. I think it's pretty doable for now, though. My body isn't feeling bad from it - I'm doing OK.

I hope you have a smooth walking track/hiking trail in your future, getting back to a better level of fitness. It'll be here before you know it, and let me just say that the feeling of "I can do this" is amazing when exercise starts being enjoyable instead of punishing. That comfortable-in-your-own-body feeling. It's so great.

 

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